Scary As She Goes For Romanian Tug

 Accident, capsize, collision, containership, news, Romania, tug  Comments Off on Scary As She Goes For Romanian Tug
Mar 142010
 

MAC doesn’t have any further data on the incident shown in this video involving CMA CGM DeBussy. It occurred in Romania, at Constanţa, so the results of any investigation, if there is one, may never be made publicly available.

We’d be happy to hear more about this accident. Fortunately there were no human casualties.

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Maritime Safety & Security News – 11 August 2009

 barge, capsize, collision, piracy, pirates, Sinking  Comments Off on Maritime Safety & Security News – 11 August 2009
Aug 112009
 

Texas barge collision halts oil traffic: USCG
Reuters
There were no injuries but five crew members aboard the Caroline were rescued by a nearby vessel after the Caroline began taking on water, the Coast Guard

50-Foot Vessel Runs Aground in Newport, Oregon
Salem-News.Com
Coast Guard crews have responded to the grounding of the 50-foot fishing vessel Lori Ann, formerly the Little Linda, on Nye Beach near Newport, Oregon,

Vessel sailing under Georgian flag detained by Kamchatka Coast Guard
Daily Georgian Times
Only after a warning fire, the coast guard was able to detain the vessel. Reportedly, the vessel is registered in Batumi Port in 2006.

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Mar 052008
 

On 29th February the wife of Indian sailor Afroze Ahmed called the cellphone of electrical engineer Pritam Singh. The phone was answered and immediately went silent. An Indian called Udaynarayan rang his brother Hridaynarayan’s cellphone on the evening of Wednesday 26th February. A voice replied “Hello” then the cellphone went dead. The previous Sunday, the 23rd, an SMS text had been successfully delivered to the cellphone of a ship’s engineer and the cost of the roaming SMS facility been charged to his account.

Not especially remarkable except that Ahmed, Hridaynarayan and the ship’s engineer are three of the 25 Indian crew still missing in the Black Sea, along with their vessel MV Rezzak since 17th February.

Suspicions were enhanced by the fact that Turkish search and rescue efforts produced several items of survival equipment, lifebouys, lifeboats and the like together with an oil slick. The equipment was marked Asean Energy, a name the ship had not carried for around a decade.

That no bodies or personal effect were found is not particularly suspicious. When the British trawler Gaul vanished in a storm the only debris was a single lifejacket found the following year.

When the Bow Mariner exploded and sank off the coast of Virginia (See The Case Of The Unfamiliar Mariner) the majority of bodies were never found even though search and rescue personnel were on site within hours.

It didn’t help allay suspicions, that the ship’s manning agent, Pelican Marine, was also responsible for supplying crew, who came from the same place as those aboard the Rezzak, to the Jupiter 6 which disappeared with all hands in 2005. Then, too, there was an electronic anomaly – 32 days after its disappearance the Jupiter 6’s EPIRB briefly burst into life.

In that case, too, Pelican Marine exhibited a less than enthusiastic interest in helping the families of the vanished crew members.

Like any other piece of equipment, EPIRBS require maintenance that is often not carried out so the lack of an activated EPIRB on the Rezzak may be down to depressingly common lack of attention to life-critical systems aboard ship. Yes, batteries can suddenly, briefly, come back to life for no apparent reason.

No distress call was sent from the Rezzak, but massive structural failure or over overwhelming of the vessel in the bad weather at the time can happen too fast to send a distress call. Even if the failure did not lead to loss of the vessel immediately it may simply be that in the onboard panic the thought of sending such a call fell by the wayside under stress, as it did to the master of the Bow Mariner.

There has been much talk of piracy. Some have dismissed it because there has been no ransom demand, but piracy for ransom is more a feature of the Somalia coast. Most piracy is little more than maritime mugging – grab the cash, valuables and supplies and run – the curse of south easian waters like the Strait of Malacca, in which case there would still be a ship and crew. The third strand of piracy, in which a ship and its cargo is seized and sold, involves international gangs and big business for whom the $3m worth of steel billets and the scrap value of the vessel itself would be small potatoes indeed, although a ready market could be found in China, whose economy is driving much of the current shipping boom and newbuilds. It would be difficult to conduct such an operation under the weather conditions at the time.

Before the Rezzak left the Russian port of Novorossisk she was detained for 37 deficiencies, which included 11 problems related to stability, structure and related equipment, five related to life-saving equipment, and five related to fire safety. There were three deficiencies relted to propulsion and auxiliary equipment., four more related to navigational safety and one related to radio communications.

The ships class society apparently allowed it to sail to Bartin, Turkey, because three deficiencies could not be resolved in Novorossisk.

The Black Sea is a small inland sea. It wouldn’t be particularly easy for a vessel to vanish but still be floating. However, more advanced pirates will weld and cut the ship’s superstructure, paint it, and give it new documentation, typically from an FOC. Nevertheless, piracy, while possible, appears unlikely.

Fraud is a more significant likelihood – scuttling a ship and its cargo and claiming insurance. It is not unknown in the Mediterranean or the Baltic. One would expect the crew to have ‘miraculously’ escaped before the vessel was lost. It is a possibility being explored by the Turkish authorities and the Director General Of Shipping in India has asked the International Maritime Bureau, a private maritime crime organisation attached to the International Chamber of Commerce, for help, and sent an investigator to Turkey on March 6.

One element of the story would appear to make fraud difficult to hide: crew would have had to be involved. There is no history of the entire extermination of a ship’s crew in such cases, which doesn’t mean it can’t happen or hasn’t happened. A very large percentage of the crew, 10 out of 25, came from one tiny dot of an island, part of the Maldives, the only inhabited island in the Maliku Atoll and the most southerly island in the Lakshadweep archipelago, under Indian administration, Minicoy.

Minicoy boasts little more than coconut trees, a lighthouse and a population of a little less than 10,000. The 10 men who have vanished were almost certainly related to just about everyone else in the community. It is hard to believe that the necessary secrecy for fraud could be maintained in that community.

It is difficult to accept that one’s loved ones, relatives, husbands, sons, lovers have vanish so completely, and entirely understandable that there is a reluctance to believe that the Rezzak went to the bottom taking them with it, to cling to the thought that its crew is still alive. But the sea often takes its own in silence.

To put context into the loss, it is as if 300,000 Americans or Europeans suddenly ceased to exist. For Minicoy it is the equivalent of 10 9/11s, or triple the combined losses of Nagasaki and Hiroshima combined in the dropping of the atomic bomb in World War 2.

Its ‘sexy’ to talk about piracy and fraud, and it’s a convenient excuse to with-hold compensation for the seafarer’s families until the insurance companies pay up, but the chances are that the Rezzak went down with all hands in a storm, a great tragedy for that community, a community that, at this moment, is seeing little help or support.

Seafarers are a community bound together by the risk of work and water. The loss of the Rezzak crew is a loss to us all.

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Maritime Safety News Today – 12th December 2007

 collision, IMO, piracy, Pollution, Sinking, Somalia, Turkey  Comments Off on Maritime Safety News Today – 12th December 2007
Dec 122007
 

IMB CALLS FOR INVESTIGATION INTO NIGERIA ATTACK.
Maritime Global Net – Warren,RI,USA
“This is a totally unacceptable situation,” said Captain Pottengal Mukundan, Director of the ICC International Maritime Bureau which runs the Piracy 

Pirates off Somalia threaten to kill tanker crew: UN
AFP –
But Andrew Mwangura, head of the Kenya chapter of the Seafarers‘ Assistance Programme, said the presence of the US vessels was complicating the negotiations

Sinking kills migrants off Turkey
Aljazeera.net – Qatar
The group met in Izmir on Saturday evening and were taken to the coast, where they boarded the boat at night but the vessel capsized two hours after setting

Crews will try to bring listing cargo ship to port

Jonathan Fowlie, Vancouver Sun

Published: Monday, July 31, 2006

A team of salvage experts boarded the listing cargo ship the MV Cougar Ace on Sunday to determine the best way to right it and bring it to port.

Total tanker in Gulf of Aden collision, no pollution
Guardian Unlimited – UK
“After steering southeast at low speed, the Samco Europe is currently stabilised away from traffic in this area and is waiting for the vessel’s owner and .

 

Thai, Cambodian fishermen rescued in Vietnamese waters
Mathaba.Net – London,UK
Seafarers from the Mekong Delta province of Soc Trang on December 6 rescued three foreign fishermen after their vessel sank off the province’s coast.

 

Tanker breaks down
Worthing Herald – Worthing,England,UK
its anchor down while repairs were taking place. The crew of the Eastbourne RNLI all-weather lifeboat has been put on standby in case they are required.

Legal fears left Atlantic Conveyor defenceless

A helicopter-carrying merchant ship that sank with the loss of 12 men after being hit by two Exocet missiles in the 1982 Falklands conflict was unarmed and unprotected because Ministry of Defence lawyers feared that it was illegal to fit a commercial vessel with weapon systems, according to newly released classified documents.

The container ship Atlantic Conveyor, which had sailed to the South Atlantic just six days after being requisitioned by the MoD, was struck on May 25, causing devastating fires and explosions on board – a storage section filled with cluster bombs and kerosene blew up.

It was one of the biggest-impact attacks by Argentine Exocet-armed Super Etendard bombers because the Atlantic Conveyor was carrying four Chinook and seven Wessex helicopters, all of which would have played a crucial role in ferrying British troops across the Falklands as part of the campaign to liberate the islands.

The Argentinians were hoping to target one of the two Royal Navy aircraft carriers but the missiles homed in on the 14,950-tonne merchant ship.

 

Port State Control *updates* 11 Dec 2007

? 11th December 2007: Following text approval at MSC 83, the IMO have issued a “Code of good practice for port State control officers”.

This document provides guidelines regarding the standards of integrity, professionalism and transparency that regional port State control (PSC) regimes expect of all port State control officers (PSCOs) who are involved in or associated with port State control inspections.

Ballast water convention: Worldwide *updates*

? 11th December 2007: IMO – Enforcement of the first deadline for the fitting of ballast water treatment facilities on new build ships under the forthcoming Ballast Water Management Convention has been postponed by the IMO.

Delays with ratification of the convention, and the type approval of treatment equipment are thought to have contributed to the decision by the IMO to delay the enforcement of Regulation B-3Ballast Water Management for Ships.

Shipowners will not be required to have systems installed on vessels constructed during 2009  with a ballast capacity of less than 5,000 cubic metres until the second annual survey, but before January 2012.

The assembly has requested the Marine Environmental Protection Committee to review, and possibly extend this postponement to ships built during 2010 as well if it believes there is not the “immediate availability of type approved technology” when it meets in October next year.

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