Piracy: Seminar for Trauma, Another Win for BMP, Research Newsletter

 piracy, publications  Comments Off on Piracy: Seminar for Trauma, Another Win for BMP, Research Newsletter
Dec 042010
 

A quick round up of noteworthy development on the piracy front, from counselling for seafarers victims of piracy to another win for Best Management Practices and the first newsletter of a research project with promising aims.

Counselling Seminars

Filipino seafarers are being offered free piracy awareness seminars by the International Committee on Seafarers’ Welfare this week in Manila. Tuesday and Wednesday feature seminars with a practical workshop on Thursday for which a ‘modest fee’ will be charge for certification. Sponsored by the International Transport Workers’ Federation Seafarers Trust training in trauma counselling is included. FAME, the Filipino Association of Mariners Employment is co-ordinating the event. Continue reading »

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Maritime Safety News – 17th-20th June 2008

 accident reporting, maritime safety news  Comments Off on Maritime Safety News – 17th-20th June 2008
Jun 202008
 

2 workers killed, 5 hurt in shipyard mishap
Straits Times – Singapore
Fourteen others were hurt in the explosion on the Rainbow Star. No explosion took place on Wednesday on board the ship that was being converted into a

Posted 06/18/08 at 08:42 AM

A 52-year-old Surrey man died after being crushed between two barges at a log sorting operation near Crofton, Canada.com reported. The accident occurred just before midnight while the men were working on barges towed by tugboats in the Shoal Island area, near the Catalyst mill in Crofton

Labrador freighter runs aground
Western Star – Corner Brook,Newfoundland and Labrador,Canada
The Canadian Coast Guard received a distress call at around 1:30 am The ship’s 13 crew members abandoned the vessel in a life boat.

New Jersey – passengers ferried ashore after cruise vessel becomes disabled

The US Coast Guard issued a press release stating that the passengers and crew of a 62-foot long harbor cruise vessel were transported ashore after the vessel’s propellers became entangled.

Edinburgh ship blaze could take week to bring under control, warn
Glasgow Daily Record – Glasgow,Scotland,UK
A BLAZE severely damaging a ship could take until the end of the week to extinguish, fire chiefs said yesterday. Ten firefighters are tackling the blaze on

UK. Torbay RNLI Lifeboat aids sinking fishing vessel; tows to Brixham
BYM News (press release) – Gibraltar,Spain
A nearby fishing vessel, the Marina, responded to the Pan Pan and proceeded to the sinking vessel. The Marina was requested to stand by the vessel until the .

Regulator failed to check vessel’s safety: coroner
Queensland’s maritime safety regulator failed to inspect an unseaworthy Torres Strait-based vessel in the years before a deckhand fell to his death, the state’s coroner has found.

Queensland coroner Michael Barnes found Maritime Safety Queensland had not inspected the vessel, The Alert, operated by company Torres Pilots for years prior to the 2004 death of 55-year-old Phillemon Mosby, despite receiving complaints that it was unsafe.

German-Based Operator of Ship and Chief Engineer Plead Guilty to
Biloxi Sun Herald – MS, USA
“The company and chief engineer used the ocean as a dumping ground for waste oil and tried to cover that up,” said David M. Dillon, Special Agent-in-Charge,

Boats, words collide in dispute between marina and shipper
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel – Milwaukee,WI,USA
By TOM DAYKIN A long-simmering dispute between two Milwaukee businesses has boiled over after a cargo ship operated by St. Marys Cement Inc. collided Monday

9 Non-British Ships Under Detention in the Uk During May

The Maritime & Coastguard Agency (MCA) announced today that 9 foreign flagged ships were under detention in UK ports during May 2008 after failing Port State Control (PSC) inspection. read more.

Liquefied Natural Gas Tankers Remain Giant Terror Targets
The Cutting Edge – Washington,DC,USA
Foreign seafarers are not. US mariners will be subject to terrorism background checks through the TSA. Foreign Seafarers are not.

Somalia, French firm sign pact to tackle piracy.
By David Barouski(David Barouski)
Mombasa-based Seafarers Assistance Programme (SAP) says the move is laudable as it could enhance security of vessels and crew noting that many seagoing vessels and maritime insurers have been avoiding Somali coast because of piracy

Oil dealers raise alarm over danger of big spill at port
Business Daily Africa – Nairobi,Kenya
Marketers raise fears that KPA and the Kenya Maritime Authority may not have capacity to manage a spill of more than 1000 metric tonnes.

Singapore – IMO unique owner and registered owner ID number scheme

The Singapore Maritime and Port Authority (MPA) issued a circular reminding owners and operators that, effective 1 January 2009, the IMO unique company and registered owner identification (ID) number must be reflected in a number of ship’s documents.  This includes the Continuous Synopsis Record (CSR), the Document of Compliance, the Safety Management Certificate (SMC), and the International Ship Security Certificate (ISSC), among others. Shipping Circular No. 11 of 2008 (6/16/08).

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Reederei Karl Schlueter,RKS,MSC Uruguay,mercenaries,ferry,Pacific Ataawhai,

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Good News: Pirates Aren't Terrorists, Bad News: Pirates Aren't Terrorists

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on Good News: Pirates Aren't Terrorists, Bad News: Pirates Aren't Terrorists
Jun 052008
 

Having a somewhat cynical turn of mind when it comes to the ‘War’ on Terrorism I’ve always been leery of those folk promoting the idea that pirates are really part of the global network of terrorism. That the terrorist network exists is certainly true, it has existed for decades since (Non-Islamic) terrorists in Germany, Japan, France, the US and Northern Ireland were trained in places like Libya for a fee, and pirates certainly exist, but they shouldn’t be confused with each other.

Old Sailor over at Marinebuzz has an enlightening 15 Reasons: Piracy Attack of a Ship is Different from Hijacking of Aircraft which in essence says pretty much what the recent Rand Corporation study Piracy and Terrorism at Sea: A Rising Challenge for U.S. Security with longer words and more syllables. You can download your own copy of the complete study here, but here’s how the press release goes:

“Acts of piracy and terrorism at sea are on the rise, but there is little evidence to support concerns from some governments and international organizations that pirates and terrorists are beginning to collude with one another…

The objectives of the two crimes remain different — piracy is aimed at financial gain while the goal of terrorism is political. Although both events are increasing, piracy is growing much faster and remains far more common than seaborne terrorism…

“The maritime environment will likely remain a favorable theater for armed violence, crime and terrorism given its expanse, lack of regulation and general importance as a critical conduit for international trade,” said Peter Chalk, author of the study and a senior political scientist at RAND, a nonprofit research organization. “While there is no quick fix for eliminating all of this, we can rationally manage the threats within acceptable boundaries.”

Chalk said the study’s findings suggest U.S. policymakers focus too much on responding to worse-case terrorist scenarios rather than crafting policies to combat lower consequence (but more probable) attacks that could strike cruise ships or passenger ferries. Just as seriously, the U.S. government has paid comparatively little attention to combating piracy, despite its proven cost in terms of human lives, political stability and economic disruption.

… The overall problem is almost certainly even greater than the figures suggest as researchers suspect nearly half of all piracy attacks are not reported, usually because of fears about subsequent investigation costs and increases to insurance premiums.

…Chalk said that a number of factors have contributed to the recent growth of piracy, including: lax port security and ineffective coastal surveillance; massive growth in commercial maritime traffic; heavy use of narrow and congested chokepoints, such as the Strait of Malacca; and competing resource requirements stemming from heightened national and international pressure to enact expensive, land-based homeland security systems following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

In addition, the lingering effects of the Asian financial crisis that spurred falling wages, higher food prices and job losses in the late 1990s, directly contributed to the growth of piracy in and around Indonesia by creating an incentive for many to engage in maritime (and other types) of crime.

Maritime terrorism — attacks against vessels, sea platforms, ports or other coastal facilities — has also experienced a modest increase, particularly over the past six years when several attacks and plots have been attributed to al-Qaeda and affiliated jihadist networks. These incidents have raised concerns in the West, especially in the United States, that terrorists are now actively seeking to extend their operational reach beyond land-based attacks, Chalk said.

While the Bush administration has been at the forefront of efforts to upgrade global maritime security through such initiatives such as the Container Security Initiative and the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code, these measures are limited in scope and lack a definitive means to evaluate and audit their overall utility and transparency, Chalk said.

Overall it’s good news, given the general ineffectiveness in operations to stop piracy. But it might also be bad news: if the pirates aren’t terrorists, little more than seaborn smash-and-grabbers, will there still be the political will to address the situation?

The UN Security Council’s recent resolution on piracy may be a step forward in legitimising ‘hot pursuit’ and allowing third country forces to enter Somali waters to combat piracy. At the same time, resources, especially financial, that could be put to good use in addressing both piracy and seaborn terrorism are being diverted to shore-based projects to increase the thickness of the wall around America.

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