SD Nimble: CO2 Pilot Lines Not Isolated

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Dec 232012
 
The release of the carbon dioxide occurred because the pilot lines from the system’scontrol cabinet had not been isolated. Photo: MAIB

The release of the carbon dioxide occurred because the pilot lines from the system’s
control cabinet had not been isolated. Photo: MAIB

Unplanned releases of carbon dioxide can have tragic results. It can extinguish lives as easily as it can put out fires so it’s vital to ensure that the CO2 cylindre room is isolated when someone’s working on the fire extinguishing system, as a recent report from the UK’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch, MAIB, highlights.

It shouldn’t happen, but it does. Is your emergency response prepared?

On 23 August 2011, a shore-based service engineer was seriously injured on board the tug SD Nimble when six cylinders of carbon dioxide were accidentally discharged shortly after the tug had slipped from her berth in Her Majesty’s naval base in Faslane, Scotland.

The engineer was testing components of the vessel’s fixed carbon dioxide fire extinguishing system in the carbon dioxide cylinder room. The accidental discharge of carbon dioxide caused a depletion of oxygen levels in the cylinder room and aft hold causing the engineer to quickly lose consciousness. The tug was immediately manoeuvred back alongside and
the service engineer was quickly recovered onto the open deck, where cardio pulmonary resuscitation was started. The engineer was subsequently transferred by helicopter to the Southern General Hospital in Glasgow where, following a long period of recuperation and therapy, he made a good recovery.

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