PSA Finds Transocean Without a Bow-Tie

 offshore, publications  Comments Off on PSA Finds Transocean Without a Bow-Tie
Dec 122010
 
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Transocean Leader, key personnel did not understand the risk management system used onboard.

Deepwater Horizon owner Transocean has come under pressure from Norway’s Petroleum Safety Authority following an audit covering the company’s management of major accident risk and handling of barriers. In addition to some 14 non-conformities ranging from inappropriate headoffice directives to firefighting and lifesaving equipment the PSA found that manager were not familiar with the risk management methodology it recently introduced.

The four-day audit of the Transocean Leader facility, preceded by a one-day management meeting onshore

Transocean is  implementing a Bow-tie methodology which illustrate hazardous situations and probability-reducing barriers on one side, and consequence-reducing barriers following incidents on the other side of a diagram that resembles a bow-tie.

On the Transocean Leader facility, the PSA verified Transocean’s management and knowledge of major accident risk by reviewing two major accident scenarios in the form of ”table-top” exercises related to the facility’s defined hazard and accident situations.

Says PSA: “The audit activity was well-organised by Transocean”

Transocean’s main management defined which defined situations of hazards and accidents, DFUs, can primarily trigger major accidents. Currently there is not a complete overview of the operational and organisational barrier systems, and the company lacks a systematic approach in the area..

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No Safety Shoes – How The Toes Goes

 accident reporting  Comments Off on No Safety Shoes – How The Toes Goes
Jul 172008
 

A trainee fisherman lost the majority of his toes on the left foot in an accident on a trawler while fishing for Norwegian lobsters.

After having emptied one of the trawls into two fish tanks on the aft deck, the trainee fisherman waited by one of the corners of the hatch while the skipper closed it by use of hydraulics.

The left foot of the trainee was in the way of the hatch which either the trainee or the skipper noticed until the foot was squeezed severely by the closing hatch.

The trainee was wearing regular rubber boots.

Says it all.

Read the report here.

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Lessons from a Beaver

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on Lessons from a Beaver
Apr 152008
 

I’ve never known seafarers to adverse to beavers so the picture below may be helpful in making a point about experience versus safety.

Simply follow these steps:

1. Print out picture
2. Put picture in wallet.
3. Wait for someone to say “I’ve been doing this job all my life, don’t tell me how to do it safely”

4. Give picture to speaker
5. Run

Experience isn\'t everything

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