Feb 092010
 
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Hanging loose is noit an option

“securing methods used by the packers on and offshore was futile” says the latest safety alert from Marine Safety Forum following several incidents in which equipment was insufficiently secured in cargo carrying units.

Equipment damage was only prevented because of the awareness of vessel crews at the loading and backloading stages.

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Sinking Lifebuoys Again

 Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Sinking Lifebuoys Again
Jan 202010
 
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"Personal flotation device" is not a term that comes immediately to mind

As MAC has observed before, sinking is an undesirable trait in a lifebuoy. This photograph, from a Marine Safety Forum safety alert, makes the point even better.

The problem identified with the Altura 2.5kg appears to be twofold: First, the foam filling of the hard shell has either shrunk or the shell was inadequately filled during manufacturer; Second, the plug is either missing from the hole through which the lifebuoy shell was filled or wasn’t there in the first place. The latter may not be immediately apparent because it is beneath reflective tape.

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Core problem: inadequately filled or shrunken core leaves room for water

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Watch That Water

 Safety Alerts, safety flash  Comments Off on Watch That Water
Nov 132009
 

image Marine Safety Forum reports:
”Recently onboard a OSV in the northern North Sea two potential incidents could have resulted in major damage to equipment and/or personal injury, had it not been for the observations of the deck crew.

On each occasion after having sailed through rough seas and inclement weather the vessel arrived on location and on closer inspection of the cargo revealed excessive water in the base of the units. The Master informed the installation of the situation. The deck crew proceeded to free the drain holes in the first instance and in the second pumped out the water with onboard equipment.

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Nov 092009
 

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Lives may have been saved when a towmaster stopped a job in which two wires linked by a shackle with a missing pin were out under tension by a shackle with a missing pin. The incident is the subject of a safety alert by Marine Safety Forum.

After towing a rig for 14 days, the crew of an AHV was disconnecting the AHV tow wire from the tow bridle. On inspection the shackle connecting the two had a bent pin and after removing the safety pin and nut, it was still not releasing from the two sockets.

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Safety Alert – The Lash of the Moor

 mooring, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Safety Alert – The Lash of the Moor
Aug 272009
 

imageRecent figures from a major P&I Club indicate that 14% of claims now occur as a result of mooring operations incidents says Marine Safety Forum in a recently issued safety alert. Elements in a recent incident involved a generic SJA, a chief officer who took a gamble and lost, and a lack of awareness of Stop Job principles that are well known in the offshore industry but, sadly, less used in the maritime sector.

The details from MSF are:

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2009 Marine Safety Forum Changes

 maritime accidents  Comments Off on 2009 Marine Safety Forum Changes
Jan 072009
 

Marine Safety Forum has a new Chairman, Mr Karl Fear. Brian Turnbull has handed over the reigns to Karl which became effective on the 1st January 2009. Brian will now be the Vice Chairman.

2009 will also see the MSF website being updated and cleared of previous years Guidelines/Safety Alerts/Notices/Workgroup topics etc. All the past information will still be available on request from the secretary.

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MSF Advises Crane Sheave Check

 accident reporting, alert, maritime accidents  Comments Off on MSF Advises Crane Sheave Check
Jun 082008
 

MSF advises crane sheave check

Following an accident on 22nd May, 2008, caused by the failure of sheaves to rotate, Marine Safety Forum has recommended  that chief engineers or other competent persons on vessels equipped with a model of Hydralift cranes and similar should check for any signs of wear that would indicate a potential failure of the sheaves to operate as designed.

MSF recommeds that these checks should be daily until the cause of the failure has been established by the crane manufacturer. Any defect found should be reported to the crane manufacturers.

All vessels with cranes that regularly operate Subsea should check sheave integrity and visibly check rotation of all sheaves and should be aware of how quickly a failure of this nature could occur particularly when operating with heave compensated systems.

In the incident the vessel crane was involved in operations where a 20t clump weight was suspended from the crane main hoist wire. The seabed depth of the field was in the region of 1600m. It is not known to what depth the crane was deployed at the time of failure though it is
believed there could have been in excess of 1400m of wire rope deployed.

The crane in operation was a Hydralift Offshore Pedestal Crane Articulated Box Job Active
Heave Compensated. Model OC3432KSCE-(40-150)-(30-11)(21)(10-32). Immediate investigation identified the failure point of the wire rope to have been at the second sheave of the knuckle boom.

Subsequent inspection of the sheave has identified significant damage that would be consistent with the sheave failing to rotate during the operation of the crane. The resultant wear on the wire rope is potentially the cause of the rope failing.

The crane was installed in 2006 has been in operation for no more than two years. At ther time of the accident it was operating with the heave compensation engaged at the time of the failure.

Adises MSF:

• All vessels that are operating cranes of the same model or similar should carry
out as soon as possible an inspection of crane sheaves to identify any signs of
wear that would indicate a potential failure of the sheaves to operate as
designed. This inspection should be carried out by the vessel Chief Engineer or
other competent person.

• These checks should be daily until the cause of the failure has been established
by the crane manufacturer. Any defect found should be reported to the crane
manufacturers.

• All vessels with cranes that regularly operate Subsea should check sheave
integrity and visibly check rotation of all sheaves and should be aware of how
quickly a failure of this nature could occur particularly when operating with heave
compensated systems.

Source: MSF Safety Flash 08-24

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Sep 252007
 

MSF, Marine Safety Forum, has set up a work programme in response to the Bourbon Dolphin tragedy in April, 2007, to respond to industry concerns and actions raisedf by the Norwegian Maritime Directorate. A full enquiry is current underway by the NMD.

The Bourbon Dolphin, an Ulstein A102 Anchor Handling Tug Supply vessel capsized and sank during anchor-handling operations for the semi-submersible drilling platform Transocean Rather. According to report on the Marine Link websiteWhen the Bourbon Dolphin attempted to release the inner pin of the anchor, the chain ran free and caught the outer tow pin, which caused the boat to capsize. The emergency release was triggered, but did not perform as designed. Fifteen crew members were onboard, seven survived, three bodies were found, and five are still missing, thought to be trapped in the vessel.”

Only one member of the bridge team survived.

Pending release of a full report the NMD has released a series of measures for Norwegian-registered vessels intended to avoid similar incidents. Copies are available here.

Bourbon itself has established a fund of the families of those lost in the incident .

MSF will hold a workgroup review meeting in Aberdeen on 28 November 2007, preparatory to the MSF all members meeting on the 29th.

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