Fishermen Prefer Death To Lifejackets

 fishing, lifejacket, Man Overboard, NTSB  Comments Off on Fishermen Prefer Death To Lifejackets
Oct 062010
 

Discovery Channel's Deadliest Catch. Seafarers prefer death to lifejackets.

Not so coincidental, perhaps, with the US National Transportation Safety Board’s upcoming forum on fishing vessel safety is a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC, Commercial Fishing Deaths—United States, 2000-2009, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. It may, at first sight, seem odd that a disease prevention agency should be involved in fishing accidents but, then, the refusal to wear a lifejacket is a disease, and an apparently incurable one, in the US as it is in the UK.

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MAIB Fishing Digest – Tales From The Deadly Side – “1 in 20 UK fishermen can expect to die in an accident”

 Accident, fishing, maritime safety  Comments Off on MAIB Fishing Digest – Tales From The Deadly Side – “1 in 20 UK fishermen can expect to die in an accident”
Jun 032010
 

imageSafety in the fishing industry isn’t what it should be and the latest Safety Digest from Britain’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch offers worrying statistics from mouths for survivors – and those who have watched helplessly as workmates died because safety equipment wasn’t used or procedures not in place.

Raymond Strachan, skipper of Maggie Ann, remembers: “…one of my crew
lost his balance when a rope parted that was attached to one of the scallop bellys.

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MAIB Commends Skipper For MOB Save

 Accident, Accident report, fishing, MAIB  Comments Off on MAIB Commends Skipper For MOB Save
Jan 262010
 

image Britain’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch, MAIB, has commended Peter Laity, the skipper of a gill netter, Ocean Spray, for his actions in saving an MOB in December 2009. In an interview with Britain’s Daily Mail the overboard seafarer says: “I saw the net had started to go into a ball over the stern, I looked back at the boat to see if it was all okay, and took my eyes off the anchor for two seconds and that was all it took.”

Says MAIB: “The gill netter Ocean Spray was shooting the last of her ten nets when a problem with the fishing gear was seen by the deckhand on the port side of the working deck. To rectify the problem, the deckhand moved aft into the area containing the rope joining the net to its anchor, and became snagged by the rope as it payed out. He was pulled towards the vessel’s port gunwale until pinned against the safety rail by the net’s anchor.

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Maritime Safety & Security News – 08 September 2009

 grounding, news, oil spill, Sinking  Comments Off on Maritime Safety & Security News – 08 September 2009
Sep 082009
 

Crew saved from grounded trawler
Lerwick lifeboat and a coastguard helicopter were dispatched to help the Banff-registered Serenity when she began taking on water.

Rush to avert fuel spill
The Times – Johannesburg,Gauteng,South Africa
The SA Maritime Safety Authority has asked salvors to prioritise the removal with waves crashing over the bow of the casualty ship, and while she rolled

Ship safety sinking, says cruise operator
Brisbane Times
The Brisbane party cruise operator from whose boat the missing Irishman Shane O’Halloran fell at the weekend claims industry regulator Maritime Safety

Aboitiz defies Marina order
Business Mirror
(ATSC) defied the government order grounding its passenger-cargo ships and continued plying its routes on Tuesday. The Maritime Industry Authority (Marina)

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Safety Alert – MOB, Lifejackets, Hazard Assessment and Wear

 maritime safety, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Safety Alert – MOB, Lifejackets, Hazard Assessment and Wear
Sep 072009
 

image

At about 1308 on 12 February 2009, a deckhand on board the UK registered scallop dredger Maggie Ann fell overboard as he was emptying a dredge bag. He had been standing on the port dredge beam, which was suspended and almost level with the gunwale, when the dredge bag lifting becket parted.

The deckhand was not wearing a personal flotation device or a safety harness when he stepped onto the elevated dredge beam, and it was not the practice for deckhands to do so. On this occasion, he let go of the suspension chain to facilitate his emptying one of the dredge bags. As he grasped the dredge bag with both hands, the lifting becket parted, causing him to fall forward and with no protection from the bulwark, to continue to fall overboard.

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New Dawn Skipper's Bravery Praised But Better Rescue Procedures Required

 accident reporting, MAIB  Comments Off on New Dawn Skipper's Bravery Praised But Better Rescue Procedures Required
Sep 182008
 

Britain’s Maritime Accident Investigation Branch has praised the skipper of the trawler New Dawn for his attempts to rescue a Filipino seafarer, Reynaldo Benitez, swept overboard by a towing chain but told the vessel ownewr, Fuimus LLP, to review onboard equipment and rescue procedures.

During routine twin rig trawling shooting operations in international waters on the night of 13th August, says the MAIB’s preliminary report: “After attaching the port and starboard towing chains to the trawl wires, two crewmen worked at attaching the centre chain in an area of considerable danger, between the port and starboard chains. Once attached to the towing chains, the load on the trawl wires was transferred onto the chains. It was during this operation that one crewman was caught between the chains and the vessel’s bulwark rail, and was subsequently carried overboard.”

The vessel’s skipper, Chaz Bruce, jumped overboard in a rescue attempt but himself began to suffer the effects of cold water. It was only with great difficulty that the rest of the crew managed to bring the skipper back onboard. The fallen seafarer remains missing.

New Dawn appears in the BBC Television Series Trawlermen which began a new set of episodes in August.

Following the incident, Fuimus LLP modified the procedure utilised when attaching towing chains to the trawl warps, so that the middle towing chain is attached before the port and starboard chains; Made the wearing of inflatable lifejackets compulsory for all crew during shooting and hauling operations and established procedures to ensure that all crew are in positions of safety before the load from trawl warps is transferred to the towing chains.

MAIB’s Deputy Chief Inspector of Marine Accidents has written to the vessel’s owner to acknowledge the actions taken since the accident, and “the valiant attempt made by the skipper to rescue his colleague overboard. However, the Deputy Chief Inspector also recognised the personal danger the skipper placed himself in while attempting this rescue, and suggested the owner may wish to review the equipment available on board the vessel, and procedures which may be adopted, to better facilitate the recovery of a person from the sea”.

MAC would like to make a few comments that might be more generally applicable. It can be very difficult to recover someone, even conscious and in good conditions, from the water without training, practice or the right equipment. Review your ability to do it.

Lifejackets too often go by-the-by on small working vessels, New Dawn was nearly 15 metres. There are all sorts of rationalisations for not wearing one, in the same way that some folk ‘rationalise’ not wearing a seatbelt in a car. Despite bright colours and reflective tape its hard enough to find a lifejacket-wearing MOB at night even in moderate weather, without a lifejacket your chances of being found are slim to none.

Think of a lifejacket as a condom – to be worn, if possible, on every conceivable occasion.

Also, jobs sometimes get done the same way, day after day, year after year without anyone asking ‘is there a safer way to do this job?’. Eventually, the job becomes standard operating procedure – it’s done that way because it’s always been done that way. Making a job safer may be as simple as changing the order it which it is done. Is there a job that can be done safer on your vessel?

Jun 092008
 

Fortunately Mobilarm will provide some for you if you fall overboard. The company’s website announces: “Mobilarm provides lorem ipsum dolor sit arnet, cons etetur sadlpiscing elltra sed diam nonurmy”, which is a relief to know, but what does it actually mean?

Mobilarm’s page on it’s recently launched V100 VPIRB, doesn’t enlighten us so prehaps lorem ipsum is an optional extra on top of the $749 asking price.

Okay, I’ll come clean, just to prove that being sarky can be educational. “Lorem ipsum” is a place-filler used in designing pages, print or electronic, which stops you being distracted by the meaning of the words so you can concentrate on the look of the presention. Evidentally this oddity is left over from the design stage of the Mobilarm webpage.

The effect appears in Explorer and Safari Browsers but does on Firefox.

Lorem Ipsum does have a noble lineage, though. It’s based on a text by Cicero, “The Purposes of Good And Evil“, written around 45BC. In translation part of it reads “Nor again is there anyone who loves or pursues or desires to obtain pain of itself, because it is pain, but because occasionally circumstances occur in which toil and pain can procure him some great pleasure. To take a trivial example, which of us ever undertakes laborious physical exercise, except to obtain some advantage from it? But who has any right to find fault with a man who chooses to enjoy a pleasure that has no annoying consequences, or one who avoids a pain that produces no resultant pleasure?”

I don’t think he’s talking about kinky stuff but the benefits of hard unpleasant work, like seafarers from third world countries going aboard ship to give some hope to their families for an escape from poverty.

I’m sure the V100 works and will provide you with all the lorem ipsum you need when you fall overboard.