EMS Trader: Hazardous Pilot Rig Led To Fatal MOB

 Accident, Accident report, lifejacket, Man Overboard  Comments Off on EMS Trader: Hazardous Pilot Rig Led To Fatal MOB
Jan 252011
 

Did the pilot ladder platform drag a seafarer to death?

Working in the dark with poor lighting and a partially slippery deck near an opening in the railing harbours particular risks, especially when you’re on your own rigging what Germany’s Federal Bueau of Maritime Casualty Investigation, the BSU, refers to as “an indeed permissible but potentially hazardous pilot ladder construction” aboard the containership EMS Trader in its just-published report.

Nobody saw the victim fall, or knows the moment it happened, so the exact sequence of events that led to yet another grieving family cannot be determined with precision. It seems likely that the pilot ladder platform had not been properly hooked into place, that the victim had wrapped the cord used to lowr the platform around his hand and that the platform fell dragging him overboard.

What is quite apparent is that safety culture was inadequate.

Says the BSU summary: “At approximately 06151 on 4 November 2009, the EMS Trader, a container vessel flying the flag of Antigua and Barbuda, cast off from the Port of Hamburg and sailed downstream on the Elbe under pilotage. Continue reading »

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MAIB Fishing Digest – Tales From The Deadly Side – “1 in 20 UK fishermen can expect to die in an accident”

 Accident, fishing, maritime safety  Comments Off on MAIB Fishing Digest – Tales From The Deadly Side – “1 in 20 UK fishermen can expect to die in an accident”
Jun 032010
 

imageSafety in the fishing industry isn’t what it should be and the latest Safety Digest from Britain’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch offers worrying statistics from mouths for survivors – and those who have watched helplessly as workmates died because safety equipment wasn’t used or procedures not in place.

Raymond Strachan, skipper of Maggie Ann, remembers: “…one of my crew
lost his balance when a rope parted that was attached to one of the scallop bellys.

Continue reading »

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Safety Alert – MOB, Lifejackets, Hazard Assessment and Wear

 maritime safety, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Safety Alert – MOB, Lifejackets, Hazard Assessment and Wear
Sep 072009
 

image

At about 1308 on 12 February 2009, a deckhand on board the UK registered scallop dredger Maggie Ann fell overboard as he was emptying a dredge bag. He had been standing on the port dredge beam, which was suspended and almost level with the gunwale, when the dredge bag lifting becket parted.

The deckhand was not wearing a personal flotation device or a safety harness when he stepped onto the elevated dredge beam, and it was not the practice for deckhands to do so. On this occasion, he let go of the suspension chain to facilitate his emptying one of the dredge bags. As he grasped the dredge bag with both hands, the lifting becket parted, causing him to fall forward and with no protection from the bulwark, to continue to fall overboard.

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May 022009
 

Got news? Know something others should? Email news@maritimeaccident.org

Sailor lost as tug capsizes
The National – Abu Dhabi,United Arab Emirates
All five crew on the tug were thrown into the water as it quickly overturned with the force of the collision. The four survivors, a Bahrani and three .

Crewman on vessel killed in fuel-leaked fire
Thanh Nien Daily – Ho Chi Minh City,Vietnam
A Ho Chi Minh City vessel caught fire off the central province of Quang Ngai on Wednesday after a fuel pipe broke, killing a crewmember.

Man drowns after falling into waters at Port Khaled

According to police, the victim was on a cargo vessel at the port when he then fell off the boat and drowned. An investigation has been launched as to how he fell over the vessel.

Main gearbox failure eyed in North Sea Super Puma crash
Aviation International News – Midland Park,NJ,USA
An eyewitness, working on a supply vessel approximately two nautical miles from the accident site, heard the helicopter and saw it descend rapidly before it

Biden manages to anger everyone over bad flu advice
Christian Science Monitor – Boston,MA,USA
The Japanese government severely restricted maritime travel to and from the home islands when the pandemic struck.

Gigantic risks
Lloyd’s List – London,UK
The loss of the MSC Napoli and its cargo, a relative minnow compared to the new generation of boxships, is now the second most costly insurance incident .

Coast Guard Releases Tour Boat Death Report
KHON2 – Honolulu,HI,USA
“When you have a vessel that’s been cleared numerous times to operate despite having numerous problems with it, you’re talking about gross neglect,” said

Efforts on to trace sailor: VS
Kerala Online – Kerala,India
He boarded the vessel on April 10 as it set sail with its cargo for Singapore. Capt. Vinay Singh, director of the shipping company, wrote to Mr. James that

Leader of infamous ship hijacking released yesterday from Italian
WorldNetDaily – Washington,DC,USA
Cossiga singles out Palestinian groups as responsible for a 1980 explosion at an Italian train station that killed 85 people and wounded 200 more.

Coast Guard verifies position of fishing vessel Lady Mary | Coast
By cgnews
The Coast Guard Marine Board of Investigation, the group in charge of looking into the facts and circumstances surrounding the sinking of the vessel, solicited the help of the crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Willow, a 225-foot buoy

Piracy

Ship Captain: Arming Crews Will Not Stop Piracy – Detroit Local
Clancey noted that many governments will not let a ship with armed crew dock in their ports. And the notion of crew members, armed and out to sea for weeks or months, could be a recipe for deadly and costly accidents. “There have been incidents where innocent bystanders have been killed,” Clancey said. “There is exposure.”

Pirate attack foiled by navy
Straits Times – Singapore
On April 24, Nato decided to extend its anti-piracy work off the coast of Somalia. Four vessels from Nato’s Standing Naval Maritime Group One have been

Did MSC Passengers Fight Off Melody’s Pirates?
Cruise Critic – Pennington,NJ,USA
writes, “The only casualty was American John Wright, cut by glass splinters as a MSC Cruises had taken advice from the Maritime Security Center.


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New Dawn Skipper's Bravery Praised But Better Rescue Procedures Required

 accident reporting, MAIB  Comments Off on New Dawn Skipper's Bravery Praised But Better Rescue Procedures Required
Sep 182008
 

Britain’s Maritime Accident Investigation Branch has praised the skipper of the trawler New Dawn for his attempts to rescue a Filipino seafarer, Reynaldo Benitez, swept overboard by a towing chain but told the vessel ownewr, Fuimus LLP, to review onboard equipment and rescue procedures.

During routine twin rig trawling shooting operations in international waters on the night of 13th August, says the MAIB’s preliminary report: “After attaching the port and starboard towing chains to the trawl wires, two crewmen worked at attaching the centre chain in an area of considerable danger, between the port and starboard chains. Once attached to the towing chains, the load on the trawl wires was transferred onto the chains. It was during this operation that one crewman was caught between the chains and the vessel’s bulwark rail, and was subsequently carried overboard.”

The vessel’s skipper, Chaz Bruce, jumped overboard in a rescue attempt but himself began to suffer the effects of cold water. It was only with great difficulty that the rest of the crew managed to bring the skipper back onboard. The fallen seafarer remains missing.

New Dawn appears in the BBC Television Series Trawlermen which began a new set of episodes in August.

Following the incident, Fuimus LLP modified the procedure utilised when attaching towing chains to the trawl warps, so that the middle towing chain is attached before the port and starboard chains; Made the wearing of inflatable lifejackets compulsory for all crew during shooting and hauling operations and established procedures to ensure that all crew are in positions of safety before the load from trawl warps is transferred to the towing chains.

MAIB’s Deputy Chief Inspector of Marine Accidents has written to the vessel’s owner to acknowledge the actions taken since the accident, and “the valiant attempt made by the skipper to rescue his colleague overboard. However, the Deputy Chief Inspector also recognised the personal danger the skipper placed himself in while attempting this rescue, and suggested the owner may wish to review the equipment available on board the vessel, and procedures which may be adopted, to better facilitate the recovery of a person from the sea”.

MAC would like to make a few comments that might be more generally applicable. It can be very difficult to recover someone, even conscious and in good conditions, from the water without training, practice or the right equipment. Review your ability to do it.

Lifejackets too often go by-the-by on small working vessels, New Dawn was nearly 15 metres. There are all sorts of rationalisations for not wearing one, in the same way that some folk ‘rationalise’ not wearing a seatbelt in a car. Despite bright colours and reflective tape its hard enough to find a lifejacket-wearing MOB at night even in moderate weather, without a lifejacket your chances of being found are slim to none.

Think of a lifejacket as a condom – to be worn, if possible, on every conceivable occasion.

Also, jobs sometimes get done the same way, day after day, year after year without anyone asking ‘is there a safer way to do this job?’. Eventually, the job becomes standard operating procedure – it’s done that way because it’s always been done that way. Making a job safer may be as simple as changing the order it which it is done. Is there a job that can be done safer on your vessel?

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