MAIB Slams Lloyd’s List

 MAIB  Comments Off on MAIB Slams Lloyd’s List
Jun 292010
 

image Britain’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch has suspended publication of its regular Safety Digests following what it describes as a “sensationalist account” in Lloyd’s List based on a recent “carefully worded article” which the branch says “it has significantly harmed the MAIB’s ability to improve safety at sea”.

Continue reading »

Share

Fishing Fatalities: Time To Stop Shrugging Shoulders

 Accident, Accident report, fishing, fishing boat,, lifejacket, MAIB  Comments Off on Fishing Fatalities: Time To Stop Shrugging Shoulders
May 262010
 
image

image The MOB recovery system on Korenbloem was a Markus Net. The crew was unfamiliar with it and did not know how to use it.

Frustration at the inaction and lack of political will to address unacceptably high levels of accident, injuries and fatalities in Britain’s fishing industry  is evident in a recently released report from Britain’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch on the deaths of three seafarers in three incidents in November 2009.

The report covers Man Overboard accidents that occurred at weekly intervals that November which resulted in fatalities: On 6 November 2009, James Grindy, a deckhand on board the scallop dredger Korenbloem; 11 November 2009, the UK registered stern trawler Osprey III lost William Antonio, a Filipino deckhand; Raymond Davidson, a crewman on the creel fishing vessel Optik, was dragged overboard while shooting creels.

None of the seafarers wore lifejackets. In two cases the crew onboard the vessels did not have the skills or training to recover the MOBs quickly and effectively. Seafarers had not been adequately safety trained and job had not been evaluated to make them as safe a reasonably possible.

Continue reading »

Share

Safemarine Nuba Scalding: No Risk Assessment

 Accident report, burns, casualties, MAIB  Comments Off on Safemarine Nuba Scalding: No Risk Assessment
Apr 222010
 

image

A fitter was scalded by hot water from a cooling pipe aboard the containership Safmarine Nuba. No risk assessment had been done so the hazard was not identified. The UK’s Marine Accident Investigation Board has issued a preliminary report on the incident.

Says the MAIB synopsis: “The second engineer, third engineer and the fitter were engaged in fitting protection shields, supplied by the manufacturer on cylinders No 1 & 7 of the main engine, while the vessel was alongside in Rotterdam. No risk assessment was carried out and the protection shield around cylinder No 1 was completed with ease within an hour.

After lunch, the fitting of the protection shield on cylinder No 7 became more complex, necessitating the removal of platform plates, a non-pressurised pipe and the grinding of a protective bracket. No attempt was made to re-evaluate the risks. Shortly after the pipe was removed, the second engineer responded to an alarm on the boiler.

The third engineer, thinking that a bracket which had supported the drain pipe had to be removed, slackened and removed the bolts which were also holding the jacket cooling water pipe connection. As the third engineer and fitter attempted to manoeuvre the shield around the cylinder, it dislodged the cooling water pipe, which resulted in the fitter becoming drenched with hot water, 85º C, at 3.4 bar.

Safmarine (Pty) Ltd has taken positive actions, including circulating the lessons arising from this accident and ensuring that appropriate documented procedures are always followed.

Read the MAIB Preliminary Report

Share

Lessons From Aquila Triple Fatalities – Check Your Mods Professionally

 Accident, Accident report, capsize, fishing, MAIB, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Lessons From Aquila Triple Fatalities – Check Your Mods Professionally
Apr 162010
 
image

Scalloper Aquila - Ballast had been modified

Planning to add ballast or make other modifications to your vessel? Get a competent person to check the effects on stability, says a safety flyer for the fishing industry from the UK’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch, MAIB. Also make sure that the risks of fishing gear becoming snagged, particularly when trawling downwind, are fully assessed to ensure appropriate control measures are in place to prevent water ingress or capsize.

The safety flyer comes in the wake of MAIB’s report on the capsize of the scallop dredger Aquila after she became snagged on the seabed while trawling, downwind, in moderate to heavy seas near the isle of Eigg.

Continue reading »

Share

Jobs – Deputy Chief Inspector of Marine Accidents, MAIB

 MAIB, Maritime Investigation, maritime safety  Comments Off on Jobs – Deputy Chief Inspector of Marine Accidents, MAIB
Apr 152010
 

image

Deputy Chief Inspector of Marine Accidents

Southampton, with some UK and overseas travel
c.£90,000

The Marine Accident Investigation Branch’s purpose is to improve safety at sea. It has established itself as the world leader in its field and deploys investigation teams nationally and internationally from its headquarters in central Southampton.

Following the promotion of the current Deputy Chief Inspector of Marine Accidents to succeed the Chief Inspector when he retires at the end of August 2010, we are now seeking to recruit his replacement. You will be responsible for managing the main operational functions of the Branch at all stages of its investigations, as well as dealing with a wide range of stakeholders, nationally and internationally.

You will report to and work closely with the Chief Inspector of Marine Accidents in dealing with strategic challenges and in shaping the direction of accident investigation policy. You will have excellent leadership skills, a professional background at a senior level within the marine industry, as well as a professional qualification in a recognised marine discipline. You will also have exemplary report writing skills.

For further information and how to apply, please contact: SCSRecruitment@dft.gsi.gov.uk. Please do not send CVs without contacting us first.

The closing date is 23 April 2010.

Share

Ijsselstroom Capsize – Skipper ‘Not Assessed’

 Accident, Accident report, capsize, MAIB, tug  Comments Off on Ijsselstroom Capsize – Skipper ‘Not Assessed’
Apr 082010
 
image

Ijsselstroom - Skipper's competency was not assessed

Britain’s Marine Accident Investigation Board, has released its report into the capsize of the tug Ijsselstroom in the port of Peterhead 14 June 2009 and concluded that the skipper whose knowledge and experience had not been assessed, used an inherently unstable operation without a bridle arrangement that might have prevented the vessel girting, and did not use the emergency brake lift control when the tug got into difficulties.

Says the MAIB synopsis:

Continue reading »

Share

MAIB Commends Skipper For MOB Save

 Accident, Accident report, fishing, MAIB  Comments Off on MAIB Commends Skipper For MOB Save
Jan 262010
 

image Britain’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch, MAIB, has commended Peter Laity, the skipper of a gill netter, Ocean Spray, for his actions in saving an MOB in December 2009. In an interview with Britain’s Daily Mail the overboard seafarer says: “I saw the net had started to go into a ball over the stern, I looked back at the boat to see if it was all okay, and took my eyes off the anchor for two seconds and that was all it took.”

Says MAIB: “The gill netter Ocean Spray was shooting the last of her ten nets when a problem with the fishing gear was seen by the deckhand on the port side of the working deck. To rectify the problem, the deckhand moved aft into the area containing the rope joining the net to its anchor, and became snagged by the rope as it payed out. He was pulled towards the vessel’s port gunwale until pinned against the safety rail by the net’s anchor.

Continue reading »

Share
Jan 092010
 

Source: Paris MoU

Nearly a third of ships detained by Paris and Tokyo MoU members from September to November in last year’s concentrated inspection campaign, CIC, on lifeboat launching arrangements had deficiencies dangerous to seafarers aboard them. In a preliminary report, the Paris MOU says that one out of eight lifeboat drills were not carried out satisfactorily.

The findings highlight the poor performance and lack of commonsense and a refusal to substantively address safety issues by lifeboat makers, on-load hook release manufacturers and the industry generally. The Paris MoU has expressed concern about poor boat drills which it says: “is often caused by lack of training… Of the procedures or instructions and identification of hazards associated with launching and recovery of lifeboats one out of 6 was found unsatisfactory. These are related to the safety

management system on board the ship.”

Apart from a lack of concern for seafarers lives on the part of the owners and managers

Continue reading »

Share
Jan 072010
 
image

System shortfall lead to top-heavy stacks

Due to ‘system shortcomings’ inaccurate container weights on a loading plan resulted in supposedly empty boxes on top of stacks aboard the 10,000 gt container feeder Husky Racer weighing as much as 30 tonnes. During discharging operations at Bremerhaven several stacks toppled over, with 18 containers going over the side from the Magellan Charter Services – owned vessel.

Maersk Line is running trials on an upgraded software package that will provide cargo planners with the declared weights of the containers. This is scheduled to be introduced in the first weeks of January 2010.

Continue reading »

Share