Oct 092014
 

PSAlifeboatSparked by a freefall lifeboat incident nine years ago Norway’s Petroleum Safety Authority will chew on comments regarding proposed new lifeboat safety rules over the next few months. The aim, says the PSA is “returning us to the level of safety we thought prevailed in 2005”.

Some 480 lifeboats may be affected and the offshor industry has alleged that the regulations could cost $10bn to implement. While the changes will apply to operations on the Norwegian Continental Shelf, NCS, it is likely that PSA’s opposite number, the UK’s Health and Safety Authority, may review its own regulations on lifeboats. Continue reading »

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Status Mentor PGD2 Detector: Do Not Use Until…

 Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Status Mentor PGD2 Detector: Do Not Use Until…
Aug 252011
 

Status Mentor PGD2 gas meter: Do not use without the correct software

If you have a Status Mentor PGD2 gas meter do not use it until you have verified that the correct software version is installed and that the low battery alarm point is correctly configured in accordance with the instructions provided on the Status Scientific Controls website: www.status-scientific.com/software-downloads.cfm , warns the UK Health & Safety Executive.

Tests by the Health & Safety Laboratory (HSL) on behalf of HSE and discussions with Status Scientific, the manufacturer, have determined that the low battery voltage cut-off setting may be incorrect in some instruments having an older version of software.

This older software may allow the instrument to continue to remain active when there is insufficient power for it to work accurately. In this case the indicated measurement may be below the actual gas concentration in the sampled atmosphere and the alarm may not be activated when the actual gas concentration reaches the alarm set-point.

This Safety Notice is being issued as a result of investigations by the Health and Safety Executive into the Status Scientific Controls portable gas detector type Mentor PGD2. This instrument is intended to be used for the protection of personnel entering or working in an environment where there is a possibility of flammable or toxic gas being present. Continue reading »

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Offshore Safety “Not Good Enough” Says HSE

 Accident, offshore, oil, Pollution  Comments Off on Offshore Safety “Not Good Enough” Says HSE
Aug 242010
 

image Britain’s Health & Safety Executive, HSE, has warned the offshore oil and gas industry about its safety record as new statistics show increases in major injuries and unplanned hydrocarbon releases.

Figures released by the HSE show that there were 50 major injuries reported in 2009/10 − up 20 on 2008/09 and higher than the average of 42 over the previous five years. No workers were killed during activities regulated by HSE for the third year running.

The combined fatal and major injury rate almost doubled to 192 per 100,000 workers in 2009/10 compared with 106 in 2008/09 and 156 in 2007/08.

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Evil Eye Drops 9.5 Tonnes

 Crane, Offshore, safety alert, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Evil Eye Drops 9.5 Tonnes
Aug 242010
 

The crane pennant and the Flemish eye tails which have unravelled and pulled out of the ferruleA badly made Flemish eye crane pennant failed on an offshore installation dropping of a 9.5 tonne load causing what the UK’s Heath & Safety Executive calls “a serious incident. Inadequate testing by the manufacturer and incomplete technical information lead to the Flemish eye being manufactured with a mismatched ferrule/wire rope arrangement.

This incident occurred on an offshore installation during the lifting of a container weighing 9.5 tonnes. A 5 metre long, 15 tonne working load limit crane pennant was connected between the crane hook and the master link on the container sling set. The crane pennant had been manufactured from 36mm diameter wire rope and the eyes on each end had been formed by using the Flemish eye technique. Steel ferrules had been used as the termination and these had been pressed over the Flemish eye rope strand tails. During the lifting of the load the wire rope strands in the tails of the Flemish eye connected to the pennant hook became free inside the ferrule allowing the Flemish eye to unravel and the load to fall. Continue reading »

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