Accident Report – Karin Schepers and the Stranger on the Bridge

 Accident report, alcohol, containership, fatigue, grounding  Comments Off on Accident Report – Karin Schepers and the Stranger on the Bridge
Aug 082009
 
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A stranger told him the vessel had grounded

“He first realized that the ship was aground when a man he did not know came on the bridge.”

So says the Danish Maritime Authority report on the grounding of the containership Karin Schepers on 22 March 2009. The only good news in the incident is, according to the report: “The passage planning was found to be conducted in a satisfactory manner.”

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MAIB: Boxer Missed Opportunity “Regrettable”

 boxship, containership  Comments Off on MAIB: Boxer Missed Opportunity “Regrettable”
Aug 052009
 
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MSC Napoli aft at Harland & Wolff

Britain’s Maritime Accident Investigation Branch has described as ‘regrettable’ the reluctance of the container industry to tackle what it believes is a ‘widespread fallacy’ that container vessels do not need to reduce speed for heavy weather. The comment is part of the MAIB annual report for 2008 which describes correcting the fallacy as ‘critical’ following the report on the structural failure and subsequent beaching in heavy weather of MSC Napoli in Branscombe Beach on 18 January 2007.

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Maritime Safety News – 29 May 2009

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May 302009
 

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Got News? Send it to news@maritimeaccident.org

Two dead, one rescued in gas poisoning accident on Chinese ship
Xinhua – China
The navy ship was alerted for help because local maritime rescue ships could not approach Zheyuyu 1616 on the rough sea. Six hours later the navy reached .

2 hospitalized in La. after explosion on vessel
The Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Two crew members have been flown to a hospital after an explosion aboard a supply vessel off the Louisiana coast.

Fire breaks out on Italian ferry, all safe
The Associated Press
The cause of the fire was still being investigated. The ship, which belongs to the Italian ferry company Tirrenia di Navigazione SpA, was being towed

Ship runs aground in Bosporus strait
eTaiwan News – Taiwan
AP A maritime official says a St.-Vincent and Grenadines-flagged ship has run aground in Istanbul’s Bosporus. Salih Orakci, head of Turkey’s coast security,

Australian officials consider quarantine to keep cruise ship
USA Today – USA
The Brisbane Times reports only passengers who live in Brisbane or the surrounding state of Queensland will be allowed to leave the ship

Dead skipper’s family to sue trawler owners
New Ross Standard – Wexford,Ireland
However, a stability investigation to understand the stability profile of the vessel prior to the sinking was carried out by the MCIB

Harbour crash inquest witness admits to lie
ABC Online – Australia
In the statement she said she did not see or hear the HarbourCat, the Pam Burridge, prior to the collision.

Refrigerated cargo, indeed

A RUSSIAN ship captain has been charged with illegally transporting 56 passengers for four days, with a prosecutor alleging that they were essentially trapped in the refrigerated hold.

MCA publishes ‘Our Plans for 2009-10’

Maritime Journal – Fareham,UK
As part of its work towards tackling seafarer fatigue, MCA surveyors will be taking a critical look at the hours of work/rest records during surveys

Newcastle harbour chain secrets revealed
Newcastle Herald – Newcastle,Australia
Safety Bureau’s investigation into the Pasha Bulker grounding on Nobbys Beach for refit and another ship will take over the rest of the operation.

Eyes on the ocean
Times-Standard – Eureka,CA,USA
The system can be used to track oil spills — it helped during the massive spill from the Cosco Busan in San Francisco Bay — and to determine the direction

NOAA Says Changes in Vessel Operations May Reduce Risk of Endangered Whale Shipstrikes

Years of study and effort by NOAA and the U.S. Coast Guard will pay off this summer when two changes to shipping lanes into Boston

NTSB: Expanded Release of Accident Investigations to Begin Next Week

Washington, DC (May 28th 2009): The National Transportation Safety Board today announced that it will begin to release all accident investigation public .

Piracy

Kadhafi wants Somali exclusion zone to fight piracy
AFP
such as Frontex — the EU agency specialised in border security — to protect “our maritime wealth” and warned against the spread of piracy.

G8 discuss cooperation on organised crime and piracy
Reuters UK – UK
closer cooperation in fighting organised crime and greater aid to African states to tackle drug trafficking cartels and rising maritime piracy.

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MAIB Tired of Fatigue – “UK must go it alone”

 Accident, Accident report, fatigue, grounding, maritime accidents  Comments Off on MAIB Tired of Fatigue – “UK must go it alone”
Feb 202009
 

AntariBritain’s Maritime Accident Investigation Branch has urged the UK government to go it alone to address the continuing problem of seafarer fatigue following the grounding of the general cargoship Antari near Larne, Northern Ireland, in June 2008. Attempts to persuade the International Maritime Organisation and the European Union have failed and unilateral action may be the only way to protect British waters until international make substantial efforts to resolve this critical safety issue.

 

The MAIB report on the grounding says: “At 0321 on 29 June 2008 the general cargo vessel Antari grounded on the coast of Northern Ireland, while on passage from Corpach, Scotland to Ghent, Belgium. The officer of the watch had fallen asleep shortly after taking over the watch at midnight when the vessel was passing the peninsula of Kintyre, Scotland.

“With no-one awake on the bridge, the vessel continued on for over 3 hours, crossing the North Channel of the Irish Sea before grounding on a gently sloping beach about 7 miles north of Larne.

“The chief officer, who was the watchkeeper at the time of the grounding, worked a 6 hours on/6 hours off watchkeeping regime with the master. As has been demonstrated in many previous accidents, such a routine on vessels engaged in near coastal trade poses a serious risk of cumulative fatigue.

The officer of the watch sleeps for three hours alone on the bridge

“Additional safety barriers which could have helped mitigate the risk posed by fatigue were not used: Despite the requirements of STCW, there was no lookout on the bridge throughout the night; and the watch alarm was not switched on. The company’s SMS audits had failed to pick up that these important safety requirements were routinely not being applied.

“Fatigue of bridge watchkeepers and lack of dedicated lookouts have long been identified as critical safety issues, particularly in vessels trading in near coastal waters.

“However the UK has, to date, been unable to garner sufficient international support to introduce more robust standards. To ensure the safety of shipping within UK coastal waters and to protect the environment, it is therefore considered necessary for the UK to address these issues unilaterally.

“The Department for Transport and the Maritime and Coastguard Agency have been recommended to:
“• Press for an urgent review of the process and principles of safe manning at the IMO to reflect the critical safety issues of fatigue and the use of dedicated lookouts and in the interim:
• To instigate robust, unilateral measures to address the fatigue of bridge
watchkeeping officers on vessels in UK waters and to ensure that a dedicated
lookout is always posted at night, during restricted visibility and as otherwise required in hazardous navigational situations.

“A recommendation has also been made to the owner of Antari designed to improve its ISM auditing procedures to ensure: the use of lookouts and watch alarms; compliance with hours of rest regulations; and effective passage planning.”

The apparent sense of thundering frustration with the IMO and EU may have been excerbated by the fact that on 30th June a port state control inspection by the Maritime and Coast Guard Agency showed “reported three deficiencies, one of which was that the watchkeeping arrangements for the crew were not in accordance with the vessel’s watchkeeping plan, as stated in the owner’s safety management system, because an AB was not on watch as indicated in the plan… The fact that a Port State Control inspection, carried out on 30 June, identified a deficiency with Antari’s watchkeeping arrangements, in that they did not comply with the vessel’s watchkeeping plan, demonstrates that, even after the grounding, the master’s priorities were still not on maintaining safe watches, but rather on maintaining the vessel.”

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Maritime Safety News – 17th-20th June 2008

 accident reporting, maritime safety news  Comments Off on Maritime Safety News – 17th-20th June 2008
Jun 202008
 

2 workers killed, 5 hurt in shipyard mishap
Straits Times – Singapore
Fourteen others were hurt in the explosion on the Rainbow Star. No explosion took place on Wednesday on board the ship that was being converted into a

Posted 06/18/08 at 08:42 AM

A 52-year-old Surrey man died after being crushed between two barges at a log sorting operation near Crofton, Canada.com reported. The accident occurred just before midnight while the men were working on barges towed by tugboats in the Shoal Island area, near the Catalyst mill in Crofton

Labrador freighter runs aground
Western Star – Corner Brook,Newfoundland and Labrador,Canada
The Canadian Coast Guard received a distress call at around 1:30 am The ship’s 13 crew members abandoned the vessel in a life boat.

New Jersey – passengers ferried ashore after cruise vessel becomes disabled

The US Coast Guard issued a press release stating that the passengers and crew of a 62-foot long harbor cruise vessel were transported ashore after the vessel’s propellers became entangled.

Edinburgh ship blaze could take week to bring under control, warn
Glasgow Daily Record – Glasgow,Scotland,UK
A BLAZE severely damaging a ship could take until the end of the week to extinguish, fire chiefs said yesterday. Ten firefighters are tackling the blaze on

UK. Torbay RNLI Lifeboat aids sinking fishing vessel; tows to Brixham
BYM News (press release) – Gibraltar,Spain
A nearby fishing vessel, the Marina, responded to the Pan Pan and proceeded to the sinking vessel. The Marina was requested to stand by the vessel until the .

Regulator failed to check vessel’s safety: coroner
Queensland’s maritime safety regulator failed to inspect an unseaworthy Torres Strait-based vessel in the years before a deckhand fell to his death, the state’s coroner has found.

Queensland coroner Michael Barnes found Maritime Safety Queensland had not inspected the vessel, The Alert, operated by company Torres Pilots for years prior to the 2004 death of 55-year-old Phillemon Mosby, despite receiving complaints that it was unsafe.

German-Based Operator of Ship and Chief Engineer Plead Guilty to
Biloxi Sun Herald – MS, USA
“The company and chief engineer used the ocean as a dumping ground for waste oil and tried to cover that up,” said David M. Dillon, Special Agent-in-Charge,

Boats, words collide in dispute between marina and shipper
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel – Milwaukee,WI,USA
By TOM DAYKIN A long-simmering dispute between two Milwaukee businesses has boiled over after a cargo ship operated by St. Marys Cement Inc. collided Monday

9 Non-British Ships Under Detention in the Uk During May

The Maritime & Coastguard Agency (MCA) announced today that 9 foreign flagged ships were under detention in UK ports during May 2008 after failing Port State Control (PSC) inspection. read more.

Liquefied Natural Gas Tankers Remain Giant Terror Targets
The Cutting Edge – Washington,DC,USA
Foreign seafarers are not. US mariners will be subject to terrorism background checks through the TSA. Foreign Seafarers are not.

Somalia, French firm sign pact to tackle piracy.
By David Barouski(David Barouski)
Mombasa-based Seafarers Assistance Programme (SAP) says the move is laudable as it could enhance security of vessels and crew noting that many seagoing vessels and maritime insurers have been avoiding Somali coast because of piracy

Oil dealers raise alarm over danger of big spill at port
Business Daily Africa – Nairobi,Kenya
Marketers raise fears that KPA and the Kenya Maritime Authority may not have capacity to manage a spill of more than 1000 metric tonnes.

Singapore – IMO unique owner and registered owner ID number scheme

The Singapore Maritime and Port Authority (MPA) issued a circular reminding owners and operators that, effective 1 January 2009, the IMO unique company and registered owner identification (ID) number must be reflected in a number of ship’s documents.  This includes the Continuous Synopsis Record (CSR), the Document of Compliance, the Safety Management Certificate (SMC), and the International Ship Security Certificate (ISSC), among others. Shipping Circular No. 11 of 2008 (6/16/08).

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Reederei Karl Schlueter,RKS,MSC Uruguay,mercenaries,ferry,Pacific Ataawhai,

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May 232008
 

The ATSB has found that the grounding of Pasha Bulker on Nobbys Beach on 8 June 2007 occurred despite a gale warning that should have prompted the master to ballast the ship for heavy weather and take it to sea. A number of other ships also failed to take to sea.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigation found that Pasha Bulker‘s master had an inadequate understanding of heavy weather ballast, anchor holding power and the limitations of Newcastle’s weather exposed anchorage.

The safety management system on board Pasha Bulker did not provide the master with specific guidance about safely putting to sea in adverse weather. Neither the masters standing orders nor the passage plan form prescribed in the safety management system contained any guidance with regard to bridge resource or team management or encouraged its use.

The investigation also found that a number of other ships attempted to ride out the gale at anchor and the majority dragged their anchors. A number of masters did not appropriately ballast their ships and many did not understand Newcastle Vessel Traffic Information Centre’s purely advisory role, expecting that it would instruct or inform them to put to sea at an appropriate time. It was also found that the substantial ship queue increased the risks in the anchorage and resulted in another near grounding, a near collision and a number of close-quarters situations at the time.

Newcastle Vessel Traffic Information Centres advisory role “was not properly understood by the masters of a number of the ships in the Newcastle anchorage on 7 June 2007” says the ATSB.

On 23 May, the Panamanian registered bulk carrier Pasha Bulker anchored about two miles off the coast near Newcastle and joined the queue of 57 ships to wait its turn for loading coal. The ship was ballasted for the good weather conditions. Newcastle anchorage is suitable only in good weather and nautical publications contain warnings about the local weather conditions and recommend that masters put to sea before conditions become severe.

On the morning of 7 June, the Bureau of Meteorology issued a gale warning for the area. Winds were expected to increase to 45 knots, with gusts up to 63 knots, after 0400 on 8 June with high seas and a heavy swell. At midday, Pasha Bulker‘s master deployed additional anchor cable and decided to monitor the weather and the ship’s anchor position.

By midnight, the southeast wind was gusting to 30 knots and ships began dragging their anchors. Newcastle Vessel Traffic Information Centre advised those ships that were dragging their anchors. Only seven ships had put to sea in the deteriorating weather while another had weighed anchor to berth in the port.

Newcastle Vessel Traffic Information Centre did not cancel the scheduled berthing of any ship even after weather conditions had become severe. This may have compounded the confusion of some masters about the appropriate time to leave the anchorage. Advice was limited to the masters of only those ships that were dragging their anchors. Some masters assumed, incorrectly, that the appropriate time to weigh anchor was when the centre informed them that their anchor was dragging and may have waited for this guidance to leave the anchorage.

The masters of four ships were rerquested to leave the anchorage at a very late stage, when the weather conditions were extreme and just before Pasha Bulker grounded. The masters of several ships, including Pasha Bulker, had expected the centre to provide them with similar guidance earlier, when weather conditions warranted, enabling them to safely clear the coast.

On 8 June , one ship fouled its anchor on a discarded anchor cable which delayed it from safely putting to sea. At least 40 discarded anchors and cables lie on the seabed in the Newcastle anchorage but most are not charted. The position of some of these hazards and the approximate location of others is known to Newcastle Port Corporation. Such information could be used by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, New South Wales Maritime and the Australian Hydrographic Service to take the necessary action to enhance maritime safety.

By 0600 , the wind was gusting to nearly 50 knots and Pasha Bulker was amongst 27 ships still at anchor. At 0637, when the master was certain that the anchor was dragging, he decided to weigh anchor. At 0748, the ship got underway and for more than an hour, moved in a northeast direction parallel to the coast about one mile away with the wind on its starboard bow.

Newcastle Vessel Traffic Information Centre asked the masters of three ships, including Pasha Bulker, to leave the restricted area off the ports entrance. Given that all three ships were struggling to clear the coast and that there was no need to keep the area clear because there was no traffic into or out of the port, these communications were of no benefit and unnecessary, and may also have adversely influenced the decisions of masters, including Pasha Bulker‘s.

At 0906, the master decided to alter course to put the wind on the ship’s port bow and clear the coast in a southerly direction. The course change in the extreme weather was poorly controlled and Pasha Bulker‘s heading became south-westerly instead of south-southeast as intended. The ship then rapidly approached Nobbys Beach and the master’s desperate attempt to turn the ship to starboard to clear the coast inevitably led to its grounding at 0951 with both anchors in their hawse pipes.

The ATSB says that safety actions have already been taken following the incident but has issued a number of other recommendations and safety advisory notices with the aim of preventing similar incidents in the future.

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