Container Losses Less Than Claimed – WSC

 boxship, container accident, containership, maritime safety news  Comments Off on Container Losses Less Than Claimed – WSC
Jul 012014
 

lostcontainersBy and large container shippers like their boxes to arrive at their destinations, so do shipping lines, it isn’t just a matter of financial loss and inconvenience. Boxes that fall off ships can remain afloat for six months, a hazard to navigation and potential threats to the environment. But how many boxes are actually out there?

Nobody seems to know for sure. Although the Through Transport Club says that less than two thousand boxes are lost every year a figure of 10,000 is often cited in the press and elsewhere, a number which the World Shipping Council strongly disputes.

Given the ever increasing size of containerships the chances are that while the number of vessels losing boxes may get smaller the number lost in single incidents, like that of MOL Comfort and MSC Napoli could increase. The biggest single loss so far is that of the Svendborg Maersk which lost 520 containers in storms in the Bay of Biscay in February this year. Continue reading »

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Jun 302014
 

EUGEN MÆRSKDid it fall or was it pushed? Investigators are not sure whether a fire in collapsed containers aboard the 11,000 teu Eugene Maersk on 18 June 2013 was a result of friction heat during the collapse or whether there was an existing smaller fire in a container before the collapse. They are certain that in both scenarios the collapse of containers was considered a major contributing factor to the fire.

Fighting the fire might have been easier if the available equipment was appropriate to the job. In the crew’s opinion there was no doubt about the importance of getting water inside the burning containers but  the special
equipment provided on board for this purpose proved to be of little or no use.

Denmark’s Maritime Accident Investigation Board, DMAIB, says: “The reason for the collapse of containers leading up to the fire was most likely a combination of multiple factors, including the structural integrity of the containers, the weather conditions, the stack weights, the lashings and dynamic forces acting on the ship.

Continue reading »

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Beware of the Tar, Baby

 MSF, safety alert, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Beware of the Tar, Baby
Jun 262011
 

This tar could give you a nasty knock

Some road, somewhere, is missing a lump of tar. We know this because the chunk in question was found inside the forklift pockets of a container. At 1.2 kilos it was heavy enough to give someone a nasty whack, warns Marine Safety Forum, MSF.

 

Says MSF: During positioning of a container on a rig, a large lump of what appears to be road tar was seen within one of the forklift pockets of the container. The lump measured 30 x 15 x 5 cms and weighed 1.2 kgs.

“The container, which had forklift pockets on all four side, had been round tripped, taken up to the rig and back loaded and taken back up to the rig before the hazard was spotted, some two weeks after its original dispatch.

The investigation could not determine at what point the lump of tar entered the forklift pockets but it could not have been at the supplier nor the supply base, both of which have fully concreted yard surfaces. Therefore it is possible that it was present for some time prior to the container’s original dispatch. Continue reading »

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Stuffers Put The “Con” In Container

 container accident, containership  Comments Off on Stuffers Put The “Con” In Container
Apr 112011
 
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MSC Napoli: Stuffed by the stuffers

Overweight containers continue to present a hazard to seafarers and their ships long after the problem was brought out into open when MSC Napoli foundered. Crass excuses continue to made for what BIMCO’s Watchkeeper calls “cavalier behaviour that remains unacceptable” and what MAC would describe as venial greed.

In his latest article Watchkeeper cites a case from the Nautical Institute’s Mariners’ Alerting and Reporting Scheme:

Aboard what was described as a “large” container ship loading at its final port before an oceanic voyage, it was determined by the vessel that there had been “substantial under-declaration” in the manifested container weights being loaded at this port, which was later estimated to average out over the 350 boxes loaded at 12%. Because of this, the ship was judged to be in serious danger of grounding in the draught restricted channel on the way to the open sea.

At the last minute some 850 tons of ballast were temporarily discharged from the vessel’s heeling tanks to enable the ship to sail safely. But it was also discovered that stack weight limits had been exceeded in many of the deck stacks, as so many of these overweight containers had been loaded on the deck stowage“.

Those stuffing these containers are uninterested in the effect this overage will have on the vessel’s arrangements and terminals are reluctant to play their part in resolving it, fearing, possibly, the loss of business to more forgiving ports with less concern for the welfare of ships and their crew.

Says Watchkeeper:

…all too often container terminals seem unable or unwilling to make an issue about overweight boxes, even when these are discovered at the gate or in the terminal. Insufficient effort is made in many countries to persuade those stuffing containers that weights can be critical and should not be exceeded. But all too often the attitude of those who have hired the container is that they can keep loading it until the doors are just able to close. It is just not good enough in 2011.

Absolutely.

Read Watchkeeper

Relevant podcasts:

The Case Of The Bendy Boxer

Relevant Posts:

Dodgy Containers Put Masters, Shipowners At Sea

MAIB: Boxer Missed Opportunity “Regrettable”

Napoli – And There She Was Gone

Container Scams Endanger Seafarers

Napoli – Time To Box Clever

Container Shifters To Get Bloody Knuckles For Napoli Grounding?

MAIB hits container dangers

MAIB Report On The Napoli

MAIB Report On The Annabella


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Pacific Adventurer Gets Lashed For Rocking Roll

 Accident, Accident report, ATSB, Australia, container accident, containership, Pollution  Comments Off on Pacific Adventurer Gets Lashed For Rocking Roll
Jan 292011
 

Hull damage caused by oberboard containers

Australia’s Transport Safety Board has released its report into the lost of containers from the containership Pacific Adventurer, the subsequent holing of the hull and subsequent pollution.

The ATSB investigation found that the most plausible explanation for Pacific
Adventurer
’s severe, and at times violent, rolling motions was synchronous rolling, as a result of the ship’s natural roll period matching that of the encounter period of the waves experienced.

While the master took action to avoid the rolling, in accordance with the guidance in the ship’s safety management system, this action was not sufficient. The option of altering the ship’s stability by adjusting the seawater ballast in its tanks, and therefore its natural roll period, as the ship made its way up the Queensland coast, was not considered.
Much of the ship’s fixed and loose lashing equipment was in a poor condition. Continue reading »

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Steel Velcro Ship-Saver?

 maritime safety  Comments Off on Steel Velcro Ship-Saver?
Sep 072009
 
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Could steel 'velcro' help prevent ship losses?

A week after MAIB’s report of on the Riverdance incident, and the day after a Philippine ferry capsized, MAC came across this potential life- and ship- saver in his favourite science magazine, New Scientist. It is, put simply, steel Velcro developed in Germany’s Technical University of Munich.

Called Metaklett and credited to a team led by Josef Mair it uses a hook-and-eye system similar to Velcro, but is made of thin,perforated steel strips. When ‘velcroed’ together a square metre will support 7 tonnes vertically, or perpendicular to the plane, and 35 tonnes horizontally, or with the plane.

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Now available: MSC Napoli – The Bendy Boxer

 Accident, podcast, Podcasts  Comments Off on Now available: MSC Napoli – The Bendy Boxer
Aug 012009
 

With MSC Napoli no longer on the beach we have re-introduced The Case of the Bendy Boxer Part 1 into the premium library. Part 2 should be available by midday, 1 August.

Transcript and podcast are available to Premium subscribers here: Continue reading »

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