LPG Atmosphere Hazards: It May Not Go Bang But Might Still Kill

 fire/explosion, maritime safety news, SafeSpace, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on LPG Atmosphere Hazards: It May Not Go Bang But Might Still Kill
Jun 192011
 

Not explosive, but is it toxic?

Know your limits, and the limits of your equipment, and know what your detector is detecting are a couple of the lessons learned from a close-call incident during a Port State Control Certificate of Compliance “Gas”, COC-Gas, exam involving entry into a cargo compressor room aboard an LPG carrier. The vessel’s fixed gas detectors did not set off an alert even though the atmosphere was hazardous.

Says USCG Sector Houston – Galveston: ” personnel recently averted a potentially hazardous exposure to 1,3 butadiene, a known carcinogen, while conducting a Port State Control Certificate of Compliance “Gas” (COC-Gas) exam. The examiners followed USCG Sector Houston-Galveston guidance for entry into cargo compressor rooms that required the space to be certified “Safe for Workers” by a marine chemist prior to entry of Coast Guard personnel. With the compressors secured and ventilation in operation the Marine Chemist found 35 ppm of 1,3 butadiene within the compressor room and could not certify the space as safe for workers in accordance with the published NIOSH Short Term Exposure Limit, STEL, of 5 ppm.

“When notified of the gas in the compressor room the inspection team discussed their concem with why the fixed gas detection system was not identifying the presence of the gas. Further research determined that the lower explosive limit (LEL) for 1,3 butadiene is 20,000 ppm, and the fixed gas detection alarm set point of 10% of LEL would be 2,000 ppm. The 35 ppm reading obtained on the marine chemist’s photo-ionization detector (PHD) would correlate to approx .00175 % LEL, a level not measurable on the fixed gas detection system. Failure to follow this local guidance would have resulted in persormel being exposed to seven times the maximum limit allowed by the STEL”.

So, although the atmosphere was ‘safe’ with regard to the hazard of exposure it was not safe with regard to health.

Concludes the USCG: “All persormel working around 1,3 Butadiene should be keenly aware of and cautious of gas leaks and review MSDS for specific hazards and exposure limits. It is critical to understand the different hazards associated with all gaseous cargoes and the limitations of the meters in use on board and carried. Failure to follow written procedures or take appropriate precautions prior to entering or working in an area suspected of or likely to contain even the slightest amount of cargo vapor may result in long term health issues.

Safety Alert

Share

Maritime Safety & Security News 15 September 2010

 maritime safety  Comments Off on Maritime Safety & Security News 15 September 2010
Sep 142010
 

Yes, we do accept sponsorship! email mac@maritimeaccident.org)banner728

Sign up to Maritime Accident Casebook for free (If you see “You do not have permission…” You may need to log in to Maritime Accident Casebook)

Get hand­picked daily news head­lines in your mail­box through our free feed. Subscribe here:

Sub­scribe to Mar­itime Acci­dent Case­book by Email feed

Got news or a tip off? Send it to news@maritimeaccident.org

imageNews Headlines

Search for NS fishermen yields few clues
nothing extraordinary that night that … we would think would’ve caused an accident,” he told CBC News. Smith said the vessel had a four-person life

Venezuela Military Helicopter Crashes; Five Injured, Two Missing
The helicopter crashed into the navy ship, which was moored just offshore from a beach on Margarita island, at about 6:30 am local time, the minister said.

11 children from same family drown
The accident occurred on Sunday, when the boat was crossing Sobradinho Lake in the northeastern state of Bahia, the news website G1 said. The vessel had

Tanker Helps Dismasted Yacht

At quarter past eight this morning, Falmouth Coastguard was contacted by the master of the Motor Tanker Sea Marlin.
The crew of the tanker had received on their VHF radio a pan pan urgency call. They were able to identify from the call that a yacht had become dismasted and was in difficulty. They relayed the urgency call which was made by the yacht s crew on their handheld radio to Falmouth Coastguard. Continue reading »

Share

Maritime Safety & Security News – 22 July 2010

 maritime safety  Comments Off on Maritime Safety & Security News – 22 July 2010
Jul 222010
 

 

If you see “You do not have permission…” You may need to log in to Maritime Accident Casebook
macsub
Get hand­picked daily news head­lines in your mail­box through our free feed. Sub­scribe here:Sub­scribe to Mar­itime Acci­dent Case­book by Email feed Got news or a tip off? Send it to news@maritimeaccident.org
imageNews Headlines

50 missing as ferry capsizes
Daily Nation
Police suspect the cause of the accident to be overloading. Beach Management Unit officials, however, put the number of occupants in the boat at 37.

Chinese Firefighter Drowns Near Leak
Firehouse.com
The high-powered water-pumping vessel, imported from France, had been vital to efforts to contain the fire because it could send sea water up to 5

Ships evacuated from Gulf as tropical storm advances

Dozens of ships in the Gulf of Mexico have been ordered to leave the site of the BP oil spill by the US government as Tropical Storm Bonnie gathers pace.

Small fire leads to evacuation of staging vessel
MiamiHerald.com
Authorities say 130 people were evacuated from a vessel that housed oil spill response workers when an electrical outlet caught fire Tuesday, but there were .

Burnt ship sinks in PD during towing
Malaysia Star
The ship had earlier been towed to the port to prevent it from becoming a hazard to other ships passing through the straits. The 60m vessel caught fire

Continue reading »

Share

Nordic Express Island Strike – Two Minutes Alone Is All It Took To Make A Meal Of An Entrée

 Accident report, allision, ballast, Bridge procedures, bridge team management, Canada, grounding  Comments Off on Nordic Express Island Strike – Two Minutes Alone Is All It Took To Make A Meal Of An Entrée
May 312010
 

image

In the midst of a critical turn on 16 August 2007 to take the vessel into a channel between Entrée Island and Schooner Island the OOW of the Canadian ferry Nordic Express sent the helmsman from the bridge to call the docking crew to stations. The OOW took over the helm, a position from which he could not see the radar or the Electronic Chart Display, ECS.

Over the next two minutes the OOW had problems controlling the turn. By the time the helmsman returned to the bridge the vessel was on the desired heading but on a parallel track offset to the north east and heading for Entrée Island full-ahead.

Continue reading »

Share

Another One Bites The Dust – Again

 MARPOL, oil pollution  Comments Off on Another One Bites The Dust – Again
May 032010
 

image A federal grand jury in Corpus Christi, Texas, returned an indictment today charging Fleet Management Limited with obstruction of agency proceedings, making false statements and failing to keep accurate pollution control records, the Justice Department announced today.

Fleet Management Limited of Hong Kong is charged with one count of failing to maintain an accurate oil record book as required by the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships, APPS, a US law which implements the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, commonly known as “MARPOL;” one count of making false statements to the US Coast Guard; and one count of obstruction. If convicted of all counts, the company may be punished with a fine of up to $3 million.

Continue reading »

Share

NWEA Guidelines Updated

 Accident report  Comments Off on NWEA Guidelines Updated
Jun 272009
 

Guidelines for the Safe Management of Offshore Supply and Rig Move Operations (NW European Area), have been updated.

The North West European Area (NWEA) Guidelines for the Safe Management of Offshore Supply and Anchor Handling Operations were developed in 2006 as a joint project between maritime and offshore organisations in Denmark, the Netherlands, Norway and the UK. Best practise and experience exchange are basis for these guidelines and the aim has been to develop a guideline worth using worldwide.

The group rejoined to revise the guidelines during 2008-2009 and cooperated well. Serious anchor handling accidents influenced the updates of version 2.  Especially chapter 6, 7, 8 and 9 are revised thoroughly and the conclusions of the accident investigation board reports are duly incorporated in the text.
The guidelines are renamed to better explain the content of the guidelines.

Click here to download the English version of the guidelines

Comments and suggestions
All comments and suggestions on improvements to the NWEA Guidelines are welcome. Comments should be sent to postmaster@nwea.info, where they will be collated and incorporated into future versions of the guidance.

Norwegian additional info;
The Norwegian Oil Industry Association, OLF, and Norwegian Shipowner’ Association, NSA, withdraw by this their Guidelines no 061 and 61 A.

Guidelines 061 and 61A were developed earlier through the Norwegian three partite cooperation.

Norwegian input to NWEA group was based on these OLF/NSA guidelines and consequently the NWEA guidelines are considered to be three partite cooperation in the Norwegian context.

Share