Get Ready For The Titanic Centenary – With A Night To Remember

 Accident, ship accident, ship accidents, Sinking  Comments Off on Get Ready For The Titanic Centenary – With A Night To Remember
Apr 082011
 

RMS Titanic - A night long remembered

Next year will see the centenary of the Arctic sinking of the RMS Titanic with the lost of 1,500 lives, an event that was to lead to SOLAS and the creation of the International Maritime Organisation. Currently BBC Radio 4 Extra is broadcasting an adaption of Walter Lord’s A Night To Remember that is well worth listening to.

The event remained sensitive for decades afterwards. In 1947 Cunard lent on the BBC, with the help of the Ministry of Transport and the government of Northern Ireland, to ban a radio play about the sinking. There were dire warnings about ‘damage to British shipping’, legal action threatened and the shipping conference of the time approached the BBC Board of Governors to have the play stifled. Cunard went as high as it could, to the Prime Minister. The play went ahead. Continue reading »

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May 052009
 

The Case Of The Silent Assassin

In September 2007, after broadcasting several audio podcasts and blog posts on the subject we realised that confined space/enclose space casualties were disturbingly common and seemed to be a major issue that wasn’t going away. We wanted to do something, however modest, to help address the situation. We discussed the issue with IDESS Interactive Technologies, which shared our concerns, and we agreed to collaborate in the production of three animated versions of MAC podcasts of which the first was to The Case Of The Silent Assassin, based on the Sapphire incident investigated by Ron Strathdee of the Isle Of Man registry.

If you would like a copy please contact IDESS Interactive Technologies

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Maersk Kithira Death – Staff Didn't Appreciate Risk

 accident reporting, casualties, fatality, seaman, ship accident, ship accidents, Sinking  Comments Off on Maersk Kithira Death – Staff Didn't Appreciate Risk
May 012009
 

A chief officer and chief engineer did not understand the hazards of going forward to fix a leading stores hatch in heavy weather, says the UK’s MAIB. Both men were badly injured, the chief engineer fatally.

Maersk Kithira

Says MAIB:

“On 23 September 2008, the chief officer and the chief engineer of the container vessel Maersk Kithira were seriously injured when they were struck by a wave as the vessel proceeded in heavy weather conditions in the South China Sea. The chief engineer subsequently died of his injuries.
The two officers went onto the forecastle deck to secure a leaking stores hatch and loose anchor securing chain following activation of a bilge alarm.

Although some measures were taken to reduce the risk to the men before they went onto the exposed forecastle deck, ship’s staff did not fully appreciate the risk of large waves breaking over the decks in the prevailing conditions, and insufficient information was available on board the vessel to enable them to make a full risk assessment before embarking on the operation.

Subsequent to the accident, the ship’s manager has provided its crews with enhanced training on risk assessment, improved its internal auditing procedures, and has amended its risk assessment relating to the movement of personnel on exposed decks in heavy weather.

A recommendation has been made to the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) which seeks to establish more comprehensive advice, including practical guidance on the likely incidence of large waves, that should be considered whenever seafarers need to access open decks in conditions of heavy weather.

The manager of Maersk Kithira has been recommended to make improvements to its safety management system relating to its procedures for maintaining watertight integrity.”

The full report is available here

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May 012009
 

Got news? Know something others should? Email news@maritimeaccident.org

Search crew find missing oilman’s body
Upstream Online – Oslo,Oslo,Norway
It is believed Lindsay, who was not wearing survival gear, was carrying out routine checks on the
oil platform when he vanished sometime between midnight

Skipper dies after trawler sinks
Fish Update – Edinburgh,UK
THE Norwegian authorities are preparing to hold an investigation into the
sinking of a relatively modern Russian fishing vessel off their northern coastline

Sailor dies while working on ship’s drains
Stars and Stripes – Washington,DC,USA
By Erik Slavin, Stars and Stripes A sailor assigned to the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis died Friday after being crushed while working on the
ship’s .

Authorities: Man injured when canister explodes
MiamiHerald.com – Miami,FL,USA
Authorities say a cruise
ship passenger was injured when a canister exploded, in one of two separate incidents at Port Everglades.

Murphys injured in car crash
Cape Cod Times – Hyannis,MA,USA
He had no other details of the
accident. Murphy, a 2001 graduate of Massachusetts Maritime Academy, was supposed to be honored at this morning’s formation

Replica Chinese junk sinks one day from end of epic journey
Telegraph.co.uk – United Kingdom
Despite the
sinking, Mr Peng of the Chinese Maritime Development Society, said he believed the ship had “accomplished its mission”.

Trade vessel sinks at St. Kitts port
SKNVibes.com – Basseterre,St. Kitts and Nevis
SKNVibes spoke to Winston Hendrickson, Manager of the TDC Shipping Department, who said that he could not speak to a specific cause for the
accident at this

Teenage boy survives fatal boat accident by using his dead
Daily Mail – UK
Mr Che Hassan, southern regional commander of Malaysia’s
Maritime Enforcement Agency, said: ‘We are still trying to put together the pieces of the puzzle,

Helicopters grounded after two crashes in space of weeks
The Edinburgh Journal – Edinburgh,Scotland,UK
The ill-fated helicopter was carrying two crew members and fourteen
oil workers from a BP offshore oil rig. The most recent incident report from the Air

Oil & Gas UK Comments on AAIB Report into Helicopter
Apr 13, 2009 Oil & Gas UK Comments on AAIB Report into Helicopter Accident

Owner of Korean Commercial Cargo Vessel & Chief Engineer Plead Guilty to Marine Pollution Related Charges

WASHINGTON—STX Pan Ocean Co. Ltd. (STX), headquartered in Seoul, Korea, and the owner of the commercial cargo ship, M/V Ocean Jade, pleaded guilty to conspiracy as well as falsifying and failing to properly maintain records meant to ensure compliance with maritime pollution laws, the Justice Department announced. The chief engineer

Wrecked vessel’s crew wants investigation into sea strike
Honolulu Star-Bulletin – Honolulu,HI,USA
Stewart said that about 15 minutes before the
collision, the crew on watch noticed the freighter change direction and head toward the TaiPing.

Genco Shipping & Trading Limited Announces First Quarter 2009
PR Newswire (press release) – New York,NY,USA
As previously announced, the Genco Cavalier, a 2008-built Supramax
vessel, was involved in a minor collision caused by another vessel in its vicinity during

Survivors and crew of sunken BC ferry still seeking compensation
CBC.ca – Toronto,Ontario,Canada
(CBC) A BC Ferries worker who barely escaped the
sinking Queen of the North ferry says that after three years of struggling with mental and physical

Selendang Ayu Settlement
Alaska’s SuperStation – AK,USA
Four years ago the
ship became grounded and broke apart off of Unalaska Island. IMC Shipping, out of Singapore, has paid the state nearly 845-thousand

Brazil: a growing poaching presence
FIS.com (Registro) – Tokyo,Argentina
Incidents involving gun firings and even a
collision attempt directed by a Brazilian ship against a Uruguayan military ship have gone beyond the occasional

Piracy

JTF Kills 6 Militants, Frees Hijacked Vessel
THISDAY – Apapa,Lagos,Nigeria
He said they returned
fire, drowning six of the militants suspected to be members of the Niger Delta Peoples Volunteer Force (NDPVF) in the process,

Walk the plank? No, gun the skiff

THE CREW of the box ship Boularibank found a novel way to repel Somali pirates, the vessel’s owner said today: tossing large planks of wood at them.

Canada’s release of pirates “nuts,” expert says
Globe and Mail – Canada
Canada is also a signatory to the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, which makes
piracy an international crime, formalizing maritime law that dates back

At former British prison, Somali pirates tell their side
McClatchy Washington Bureau – Washington,DC,USA
Five of those prisoners are serving 15-year terms for
piracy. |

Ship captain: Just arming crews won’t stop piracy
The Associated Press
Armed with knives and
fire hoses, Phillips and his crew of about 20 tried and initially failed to fight off a raid by young pirates armed with automatic

Armed Cruise Ship Security Team Fights Off Somali Pirates
InjuryBoard.com – Tampa,FL,USA
and he Israeli security guards opened fire with small arms. The pirates backed off but continued to follow the ship for about 20 minutes firing at it.

New pirate attacks on Italian ship
Ansa news in English – Rome,Rome,Italy
On Wednesday the
ship’s crew fended off another attack 300 miles south-east of Mogadishu after a small boat with seven pirates approached it and opened fire

Maersk to increase its ships’ precautions, but no guns
The Virginian-Pilot – Norfolk,VA,USA
Chalk said Maersk should continue having its ships transit through
maritime corridors where naval ships keep watch. But smaller shipping companies aren’t

Russians detain 29 suspected pirates
United Press International – USA
The would-be hijackers, armed with automatic weapons and grenade launchers, opened
fire on the vessel but were outmaneuvered, a company statement said.

Government studying other measures to protect seamen
Philippine Star – Manila,Philippines
The same circular also gives Filipino
seafarers the option to disembark if he feels any threat passing Somalia. But Roque said not a single seafarer opted

Filipino Seafarers Top Victims of Somali Pirates
Voice of America – USA
“Our experience has been that we have not had any
casualty from among those The International Maritime Bureau says pirate attacks off the Somali coast

Spanish navy arrests pirates
Monsters and Critics.com – USA
with security personnel returning fire. According to Campain Ciro Pinto, the ship was slightly damaged, but none of the passengers suffered any injures.

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Did Tongues Sink Mary Rose? 500 Years On, Mysteries and Familiar Answers

 collision, maritime accidents, ship accident, Sinking  Comments Off on Did Tongues Sink Mary Rose? 500 Years On, Mysteries and Familiar Answers
Aug 062008
 

Filling big, expensive ships with ill-trained mariners from the third world with but a smattering of English is nothing new, if recent research into the sinking of the, brief, pride of Henry VIII’s fleet in 1545 if Professor Hugh Montgomery, a medical researcher at University College London is to be believed.

Mary Rose, named after Henry’s daughter and the rose symbol of the house of Tudor, took on a bunch of grenouille-scoffing Frenchmen in battle in the Solent, off of England’s south coast. She suddenly sank, without the help of the French, with the loss of nearly 400 crew and remained in the mud until the early 1980’s when her starboard side was recovered and taken ashore for preservation by the Mary Rose Trust.

Rescuers come to the aid of the Mary Rose survivors, about 30 out of some 400

Artifacts from the wreck give a fascinating, and human, insight into seafaring of those time, from longbows to medical kits to haunting personal items from the lost sailors.

Unanswered so far is why she sank. It is generally thought that she heeled over in a turn and took on water through her open gunports with her commander, Admiral George Carew cursing the crew as “Knaves I cannot rule”. The high death toll might in part be due to the rapidity of her sinking, the net placed over the deck to deter boarders and also to a belief by seafarers of the time that learning to swim was tempting fate.

MAC suspects that water on the gundeck would have invoked a free-surface effect that made in all but impossible for the vessel to recover stability once water entered. It a familiar phenomenon on ro-ro ferries that lose integrity.

In those days ships were built to rule-of-thumb formulae tested by tradition. However, Mary Rose was of an unusual size and it may be that the dynamics were significantly different on that scale.

Built around 1509-1510, she was 32 metres long with an 11.7 metres beam . Over the next few years she underwent two refits which increased her tonnage from 500 tonnes to 700 tonnes, added an extra deck and more and heavier guns. Thus her draught was increased, bringing her gunports closer to the waterline.

Tests with a scale model showed that, with the gunports open a sudden unexpected wind during the turn, reported at the time, could have put those gunports underwater and caused her to flood and sink. The same tests showed that her sinking wasn’t inevitable: had the ports been closed she would have survived.

Many skeletal remains have been recovered and have been studied by Professor Montgomery who discovered, based on skull shape, that around 60 per cent of the crew came from the Mediterranean, probably as mercenaries.

His theory is that most of the crew didn’t understand Carew’s orders because they didn’t know English and thus failed too close the gunports swiftly as the ship turned.

Language issues are not uncommon even today in maritime accidents, as The Case Of The Tongues Of Fire shows. Incomprehension of an officer’s orders has a number of effects – orders may not be understood and therefore not followed, or followed too late or, even worse, his subordinates do what they think is right rather than what the officer intended.

In a way more important, however, is that an officer who is not understood is unlikely to be able to impose the sort of discipline needed to remain in effective command. Which may be behind Carew’s inability to rule his knaves.

MAC somehow finds Professor Montgomery’s theory a little unsatisfactory. In those centuries explorers were travelling the world with multinational crews and had few language problems . Multinational crews were common on warships of the period and MAC has yet to come across many incidents in which ships were lost because of language problems aboard.

What we today call mercenaries were hired not merely because they were warm bodies but they knew their business. a ship in battle needs a well drilled crew that knows what it’s doing. One cannot know how ‘fresh’ this particular crew were but the Mary Rose had been in action several times during her career. These may well have been seasoned professionals.

Let’s start with the ship turning. Why was she turning? As a ship of this type turns at speed, the side on the outside of the curve will effectively elevate the cannon, which could result in longer range, but will also increase the angle of heel.

It cannot have been particularly unusual for gun ports in the side of the ship inside the curve to go close to, or even under the water, so closing those ports in time would have been critical, and equally critical to open them rapidly afterwards to have the cannon in position to take advantage of the increased elevation as the ship recovered then heeled in the other direction.

Imagine an S-shaped course in which the gun on the lower side of the heel are being prepared for firing while those on the high side are firing. The ship could keep up an almost continuous fire against the enemy while, at the same time, it’s maneouvers would make it difficult to get a fix.

Whether or not that was Carew’s strategy, the crew on the lowest gun deck would still have had to go through a well-drilled routine – close the ports, load the the guns, open the ports, fire at the right time and begin the cycle all over again.

MAC has already used the term ‘drilled’ twice. Professor Montgomery is quoted in the Daily Mail: ‘In the chaos of battle, with all the shouting and guns going off, it would have taken a very clear chain of command and a very disciplined, well-rehearsed crew to close the gun port lids in time.’

Therein may lay the answer to the mystery of the sinking of the Mary Rose. Carew’s knaves simply weren’t drilled enough and it cost almost 400 lives and the ship. True, they may have had experience but if there’s insufficient re-enforcement through drilling that experience may ceaseto be effective.

Doesn’t that sound familiar?

There may, indeed, be another factor – Carew had only taken command of the ship the previous day. A commander unused to his ship and the crew with little ‘shakedown’ time might well explain Carew’s dying words, but since he was a fine Englishman I suppose it’s not surprising that those pesky furrigners get the blame for not understanding his commands.

Mary Rose Trust

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Mar 132008
 
Queen Of The North

Canada’s Transportation Safety Board blames poor watchkeeping practices which lead to a course change not being made for the loss of the  8,889 gross tonnes ferry Queen Of The North on March 22, 2006 at Gil Island, Wright Sound, British Columbia, but has declined to provide details of a personal 14 minute conversation between the ship’s fourth officer and the quartermaster on the bridge immediately before the accident.

Speculation about what was said or happened has been of particular interest because  the female quartermaster and the male fourth officer had been in a relationship which ended two weeks before the incident. This was the first watch they had been on together since the break-up.

Despite aggressive questioning from some Canadian journalists, TSB chairman Wendy Tadros declined to give details of the conversation except to say “we have no evidence that it was a fight.”

Behind the discretion is concern about the willingness of crews to  provide information relevant to future investigations. While maritime accident investigations do not depend wholly on crew statements and recollections, often the weakest of evidence, they are still an important element and the co-operation of crew in giving information could be compromised by revealing personal details that do not directly relate to making travel safer.

Said Tadros “We learned what was happening with the vessel… we learned what we needed to learn.”

TSB has recommended the introduction of Voyage Data Recorders, VDRs, the maritime equivalent of aviation’s “little black box”, onto Canadian vessels. These record instrument data as well as what is spoken on the bridge.

About half the investigation’s $900,000 cost went on an ROV dive to recover data from the ship at a depth of some 1,500 metres.  The vessel’s Transas ECS was recovered, together with the AIS, GPS and DSC radio. The ECS data was able to be extracted.

The Queen of the North grounded and sank after failure to make a course change which the fourth officer believed he had ordered. Several distractions may have contributed to the failure. As second course change was due 27 minutes later but he did not monitor whether the first change had been made as he was involved in a personal conversation with the quartermaster for the next 14 minutes.

When he did realise that the vessel was off course, his actions were too little, too late, to prevent striking the island. ECS alarms that might have given a warning were switched off.

There a further delay in responding to the situation because the quartermaster was not familiar with the bridge equipment and did not know how to switch off the autopilot and revert to manual steering.

There should, in fact, have been at least two qualified officers on the bridge but the second officer was on a scheduled meal break at the time of the incident.

“Accidents speak to a failure of the system,” said Tadros, “Essentially, the system failed that night. Sound watchkeeping practices were not followed and the bridge watch lacked a third certified person.”

In its conclusions , the TSB report notes: “The working environment on the bridge of the Queen of the North was less than formal, and the accepted principles of navigation safety were not consistently or rigorously applied. Unsafe navigation practices persisted which, in this occurrence, contributed to the loss of situational awareness by the bridge team.”

At 08:00 p.m. on March 21, 2006, the passenger and vehicle ferry Queen of the North departed Prince Rupert, British Columbia, for Port Hardy, British Columbia. On board were 59 passengers and 42 crew members. After entering Wright Sound from Grenville Channel, the vessel struck the northeast side of Gil Island at 12:21 a.m. on March 22.

The vessel sustained extensive damage to its hull, lost its propulsion, and drifted for 1 hour and 17 minutes before it sank in 430 m of water. Passengers and crew abandoned the vessel before it sank. Two passengers were unaccounted for after the abandonment and have since been declared dead.

The full report can be downloaded here.

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 Posted by at 03:48  Tagged with: , ,
Mar 052008
 

On 29th February the wife of Indian sailor Afroze Ahmed called the cellphone of electrical engineer Pritam Singh. The phone was answered and immediately went silent. An Indian called Udaynarayan rang his brother Hridaynarayan’s cellphone on the evening of Wednesday 26th February. A voice replied “Hello” then the cellphone went dead. The previous Sunday, the 23rd, an SMS text had been successfully delivered to the cellphone of a ship’s engineer and the cost of the roaming SMS facility been charged to his account.

Not especially remarkable except that Ahmed, Hridaynarayan and the ship’s engineer are three of the 25 Indian crew still missing in the Black Sea, along with their vessel MV Rezzak since 17th February.

Suspicions were enhanced by the fact that Turkish search and rescue efforts produced several items of survival equipment, lifebouys, lifeboats and the like together with an oil slick. The equipment was marked Asean Energy, a name the ship had not carried for around a decade.

That no bodies or personal effect were found is not particularly suspicious. When the British trawler Gaul vanished in a storm the only debris was a single lifejacket found the following year.

When the Bow Mariner exploded and sank off the coast of Virginia (See The Case Of The Unfamiliar Mariner) the majority of bodies were never found even though search and rescue personnel were on site within hours.

It didn’t help allay suspicions, that the ship’s manning agent, Pelican Marine, was also responsible for supplying crew, who came from the same place as those aboard the Rezzak, to the Jupiter 6 which disappeared with all hands in 2005. Then, too, there was an electronic anomaly – 32 days after its disappearance the Jupiter 6’s EPIRB briefly burst into life.

In that case, too, Pelican Marine exhibited a less than enthusiastic interest in helping the families of the vanished crew members.

Like any other piece of equipment, EPIRBS require maintenance that is often not carried out so the lack of an activated EPIRB on the Rezzak may be down to depressingly common lack of attention to life-critical systems aboard ship. Yes, batteries can suddenly, briefly, come back to life for no apparent reason.

No distress call was sent from the Rezzak, but massive structural failure or over overwhelming of the vessel in the bad weather at the time can happen too fast to send a distress call. Even if the failure did not lead to loss of the vessel immediately it may simply be that in the onboard panic the thought of sending such a call fell by the wayside under stress, as it did to the master of the Bow Mariner.

There has been much talk of piracy. Some have dismissed it because there has been no ransom demand, but piracy for ransom is more a feature of the Somalia coast. Most piracy is little more than maritime mugging – grab the cash, valuables and supplies and run – the curse of south easian waters like the Strait of Malacca, in which case there would still be a ship and crew. The third strand of piracy, in which a ship and its cargo is seized and sold, involves international gangs and big business for whom the $3m worth of steel billets and the scrap value of the vessel itself would be small potatoes indeed, although a ready market could be found in China, whose economy is driving much of the current shipping boom and newbuilds. It would be difficult to conduct such an operation under the weather conditions at the time.

Before the Rezzak left the Russian port of Novorossisk she was detained for 37 deficiencies, which included 11 problems related to stability, structure and related equipment, five related to life-saving equipment, and five related to fire safety. There were three deficiencies relted to propulsion and auxiliary equipment., four more related to navigational safety and one related to radio communications.

The ships class society apparently allowed it to sail to Bartin, Turkey, because three deficiencies could not be resolved in Novorossisk.

The Black Sea is a small inland sea. It wouldn’t be particularly easy for a vessel to vanish but still be floating. However, more advanced pirates will weld and cut the ship’s superstructure, paint it, and give it new documentation, typically from an FOC. Nevertheless, piracy, while possible, appears unlikely.

Fraud is a more significant likelihood – scuttling a ship and its cargo and claiming insurance. It is not unknown in the Mediterranean or the Baltic. One would expect the crew to have ‘miraculously’ escaped before the vessel was lost. It is a possibility being explored by the Turkish authorities and the Director General Of Shipping in India has asked the International Maritime Bureau, a private maritime crime organisation attached to the International Chamber of Commerce, for help, and sent an investigator to Turkey on March 6.

One element of the story would appear to make fraud difficult to hide: crew would have had to be involved. There is no history of the entire extermination of a ship’s crew in such cases, which doesn’t mean it can’t happen or hasn’t happened. A very large percentage of the crew, 10 out of 25, came from one tiny dot of an island, part of the Maldives, the only inhabited island in the Maliku Atoll and the most southerly island in the Lakshadweep archipelago, under Indian administration, Minicoy.

Minicoy boasts little more than coconut trees, a lighthouse and a population of a little less than 10,000. The 10 men who have vanished were almost certainly related to just about everyone else in the community. It is hard to believe that the necessary secrecy for fraud could be maintained in that community.

It is difficult to accept that one’s loved ones, relatives, husbands, sons, lovers have vanish so completely, and entirely understandable that there is a reluctance to believe that the Rezzak went to the bottom taking them with it, to cling to the thought that its crew is still alive. But the sea often takes its own in silence.

To put context into the loss, it is as if 300,000 Americans or Europeans suddenly ceased to exist. For Minicoy it is the equivalent of 10 9/11s, or triple the combined losses of Nagasaki and Hiroshima combined in the dropping of the atomic bomb in World War 2.

Its ‘sexy’ to talk about piracy and fraud, and it’s a convenient excuse to with-hold compensation for the seafarer’s families until the insurance companies pay up, but the chances are that the Rezzak went down with all hands in a storm, a great tragedy for that community, a community that, at this moment, is seeing little help or support.

Seafarers are a community bound together by the risk of work and water. The loss of the Rezzak crew is a loss to us all.

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Feb 232008
 

From Det Norske Veritas 

Singapore: Updated figures for 2007 show that the losses from navigational accident within the shipping industry are continuing to increase. This trend is also confirmed by the insurance industry. Premiums may increase by as much as 30 per cent in 2008.

DNV monitors the annual frequency of serious accidents. Over the past five years, there has been an increasing incidence of serious navigational accidents in several shipping segments. This increase is confirmed by a lot of the leading insurance companies such as Skuld, Norwegian Hull Club and The Swedish Club.

In addition to the increasing frequency of navigational accidents, the cost of each repair caused by accidents is rising. The yards are overbooked, making it hard to find a repair slot resulting in increased prices. Collisions, groundings and contacts now account for 60% of the most costly accidents.

Dr. Torkel Soma, Principal Safety Consultant in DNV Maritime, says: “DNV’s statistics shows that a ship is twice as likely to be involved in a serious grounding, collision or contact accident today compared to only five years ago. In addition, estimates show that also the costs of these accidents have doubled. Since this is the general trend for the international commercial fleet, the maritime industry needs to act on this immediately.”

The boom in the shipping market and increased deliveries of newbuildings has resulted in pressure on crews. The shortage of officers has resulted in lower retention and faster promotion. As a result, the general level of experience is decreasing on board. At the same time new technical solutions have been introduced which might have increased the complexity of operations.

Dr. Soma pinpoint: “Reliable technology and complying manuals are no assurance against making errors. Collisions, groundings and contact accidents do almost always involve human acts.”

The latest figures were presented at a DNV seminar in Singapore. Helge Kjeøy, regional manager DNV Maritime South East Asia says: “The main factors explaining the negative developments over the past few years are – that the undersupply of crew worldwide results in reduced experience and that the high commercial pressure results in a high workload. Adding new and more complex equipment does not only help the situation. Avoiding accidents under such situations requires a good safety culture, something which the maritime industry evidently needs to focus more on.”

The experience of leading shipping companies shows that the focus has to be turned more in the direction of human elements and organisational factors, including all those involved – from the directors of the company to the officers on the bridge. Dr. Soma summarize: “Radical safety performance improvements with reduced accident frequency have been achieved through a structured approach addressing behaviour and culture. For the industry to maintain its traditional good track record, the resilience of operations has to be addressed on a larger scale by industry players.”

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 Posted by at 14:38  Tagged with:

Maritime Safety News Today – 4th February 2008

 maritime accidents, ship accident, ship accidents, Sinking  Comments Off on Maritime Safety News Today – 4th February 2008
Feb 042008
 

2 dead in tug boat sinking
Globe and Mail – Canada
The coast guard dispatched a Cormorant helicopter, a Hercules aircraft, and two vessels to the scene, but spokesman Christopher Fitzgerald says things
 Dubai ship sinks off Manama
Khaleej Times – Dubai,United Arab Emirates
Strong winds that hit the Gulf late on Thursday night were said to be the cause of the ship’s sinking. However, 17 Indian crew members were reportedly
 Crew airlifted to safety from stricken Irish Sea ferry
AFP –
The rescue operation, run by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA), Royal Air Force and Royal National Lifeboat Institution, involved three helicopters
 Stricken ferry runs aground
The Press Association –
the Maritime and Coastguard Agency said. A total of 14 people were airlifted to safety from the Riverdance, a roll-on roll-off vessel,
 Newfoundland mayor one of two dead in sinking
National Post – Toronto,Ontario,Canada
The bodies were brought to St. John’s by the coast guard vessel for autopsies Friday morning. The deaths are the first marine fatalities in Newfoundland ..
Boat captain in clear after crash into bridge
ic SouthLondon.co.uk – United Kingdom
Mr Watson said: “He failed to exercise due care and attention and as a result his vessel went off course and crashed into the bridge.
 Salvage studies on stricken boat
BBC News – UK
The MCA said pollution as a result of the vessel’s grounding on Hirta was not considered to be a serious concern. St Kilda, a group of islands lying 44
 THE LOG EXCLUSIVE: Grounded 82-footer in Bizarre Accident at Cat
The Log Newspaper – Irvine,CA,USA
Another moored vessel in Cat Harbor was thought to have sustained minor damage in a collision with Intrepid as the 82-footer headed for the rocks.
How one clumsy ship cut off the web for 75 million people
Guardian Unlimited – UK
“It will depend on how bad the damage is, but they’ll find the sections in question and bring them up onto a ship for repair before sinking them again,”

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 Posted by at 09:32  Tagged with: , , ,