Brent Charlie: MSF Issues Alert After Fatal Fall

 maritime safety news, Offshore, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Brent Charlie: MSF Issues Alert After Fatal Fall
Jul 132011
 

Brent Charlie

Marine Safety Forum, MSF, has issued a safety flash regarding rope access following the death of a rope access technician in a fall from the Shell Brent Charlie platform some 120 miles north east of Lerwick in Shetland.

Says MSF: “On June 16th, 2011 a fatal accident happened on the Shell Platform Brent Charlie in the North Sea. The victim was a rope access technician who was working for BIS Salamis.

Although the investigation into this tragic accident is currently in progress the following memorandum from the HSEQ manager of BIS Salamis has been forwarded to us by Shell: Continue reading »

BOEMRE Reissues Alert 259 On Offshore Mooring After Chain-Link Failure

 Accident report, mooring, mooring, Offshore, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on BOEMRE Reissues Alert 259 On Offshore Mooring After Chain-Link Failure
May 302011
 

Investigation determined that a 6 3⁄4-inch diameter, 862-pound chain link in the tether chain had fractured and separated near its butt weld.

In early 2011, a single point mooring system for a deepwater Gulf of Mexico (GOM) project failed at the tether chain for a free-standing hybrid riser, allowing the buoyancy air can and the free-standing flowline riser to separate. The 440-ton buoyancy air can rose suddenly to the surface while the free standing riser collapsed. Based on the investigation of this event and a review of historical events, BOEMRE is revising and re-issuing Safety Alert #259.

 

The investigation determined that a 6 3/4-inch diameter, 862-pound chain link in the tether chain had fractured and separated near its butt weld. Analysis of the fracture indicated that the chain link had a weld repair and the fracture initiated in the middle of the weld. Three links of the 24-link tether chain were found to have weld repairs. After the chain had been heat treated, the non-US based manufacturer had made weld repairs to the chain by grinding defects and filling the void with weld material. The chain was being built in accordance with Det Norske Veritas (DNV) Offshore Mooring Chain standard. Post heat treat weld repairs are disallowed per DNV’s Offshore Mooring Chain standard. The post heat treat weld repairs made the chain susceptible to hydrogen induced stress cracking due to the extreme hardness of the weld material and the residual stress within the weld. Continue reading »

Nopsa: Inspections Lead To Offshore Lifeboat Concerns

 lifeboat, lifeboat safety, Offshore, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Nopsa: Inspections Lead To Offshore Lifeboat Concerns
May 282011
 

Emergency evacuation of Montara Wellhead Platform and West Atlas mobile offshore drilling unit (MODU) using lifeboats on 21 August 2010 Image courtesy of Skytruth

Recent inspections conducted by Australia’s National Offshore Petroleum Safety Authority, NOPSA, and information provided to NOPSA have raised concerns regarding the general condition of some Totally Enclosed Motor Propelled Survival Craft (TEMPSC) currently in use in the offshore regime.

 

Inspection findings have resulted in nine enforcement actions on facility operators in the past four months.

The enforcement actions focused primarily on the lack of effective routine maintenance and inspections being conducted on facility TEMPSC.

TEMPSC were identified with damaged or broken safety harnesses, unsecured and loose items, and illegible safety and operating instructions. A shortfall in the competencies of personnel assigned to essential lifeboat duties was also noted. Continue reading »

Warning On Chinese Chains

 Accident, China, close call, equipment, Offshore, Offshore, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Warning On Chinese Chains
Mar 302011
 

Two incidents involving chain slings have revealed that chains made by an as-yet unnamed Chinese manufacturer may fail well below their safe working limit. Step Change In Safety has issued an alert on the incident.

On two separate occasions chain slings were used to perform lifting operations. The slings, from the same supplier, failed whilst a lift was being performed.

In the first incident an arrangement of four 5.3 tonne collared chain slings were used in a ‘basket’ configuration around the lifting points of a 20 tonne concrete block. After 5 blocks had been moved using this method team members noticed that one of the chain links had parted at its weld point.

The second Incident invoved two 2-legged 11.2 tonne chain slings to create a 4 point sling arrangement was used to relocate 13 tonne concrete blocks, similar to the first incident, after four blocks had been moved the work party noticed that a link in the chain had failed at its weld point.

The lift plan and slinging arrangement techniques were appropriate for the task. All of the slings were new prior to the start of the operations.

The chain slings were sourced from a single supplier.

It was found that the chains received were certified by batch testing only and it transpired that the name and signature on the certification was replicated by computerised signature and not necessarily the person who actually carried out the inspection or testing, giving concerns as to whether there had been any testing.
The company which bought the chains from a UK supplier has initiated a requirement for all chains purchased to be tested to Safe Working Limit.

All chains recieved from this supplier were immediately placed in quarantine and returned to the supplier, which was instructed to perform an investigation as to why the equipment failed and all similar equipment is recalled awaiting the investigation and report.

The UK based sub-supplier does not manufacture the chain but acts as an agent on behalf of  manufacturers in China, some of whom  do not hold export licences. They have immediately withdrawn all chain from sale supplied by this company, additionally cancelled all orders with this agent and will continue to request the manufacturers details but more importantly the reason for failure.

 

Boom For Daughter Should Take The Weight

 Offshore, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Boom For Daughter Should Take The Weight
Jan 272011
 

No procedures for rigging boom

During a routine Daughter Craft (DC) recovery operation the boom that was positioned to lead the bow painter forwards failed, causing the recovery to be aborted. The vessel had created a lee for recovery and the DC made a normal approach and hooked on to the bow line.

As the DC was being positioned under the davit she surged forward on a swell and, as the DC coxswain was correcting his position the swell dropped away astern causing the DC to surge astern. As the weight was taken up on the bow line the boom jumped to a vertical position and bent to an angle of approximately 30 °. Continue reading »

NOPSA Alerts On Safety Control Systems Safety

 Offshore, safety alert, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on NOPSA Alerts On Safety Control Systems Safety
Jan 192011
 

Will the PLC do what's expected or what it's told?

Australia’s National Offshore Petroleum Safety Authority has issued a warning regarding the potential for malware or inadequate design of safety-related control functions to cause death or injury when they do not perform in the intended manner. While the alert is aimed at the offshore industry it applies equally to the maritime industry where there has been a number of accidents involving programmable logic controllers.
What happened?
NOPSA has encountered a number of instances, in a diverse range of applications, where Operators have introduced equipment or systems that have potential weaknesses in the design of their safety-related control systems.
In some cases, Operators have been unaware of the significance of control systems as control measures against Major Accident Events and Dangerous Occurrences, and have consequently not used appropriate safety management techniques in their design and operation. Continue reading »

Winter Draws On – Watch Deck Cargo Ops

 Accident, Offshore, Safety Alerts, weather  Comments Off on Winter Draws On – Watch Deck Cargo Ops
Nov 122010
 

Winter weather could increase hazard during deck operations warns the Marine Safety Forum in its latest Safety Flash.

Says MSF: “Following two recent incidents during routine deck operations, one of which has been risked ranked as significant, this notice has been issued as a reminder to all involved in these operations.
Specifically with the onset of worse weather during the winter everyone should take time to  evaluate all the risks involved in these operations.

The following are items raised from the recent incidents. Continue reading »

Dangers Out Of The Side Door

 Offshore, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Dangers Out Of The Side Door
Aug 272010
 

image Britain’s Health and Safety Executive, Offshore Division, has issued the following alert regarding Failures of manually operated side-door elevators due to unplanned opening of latch mechanism of side-door elevators lifting large diameter well casing from the horizontal position.

Says HSE: “There have been several serious dropped object incidents in offshore Northern Europe, including a near fatality, involving the use of manually operated side-door elevators to lift large diameter well casing. The incidents involved the unplanned opening of the elevators, during tailing-out or lifting of pipe from a horizontal position, allowing the load to fall. Investigation of the incidents has raised concerns about the safety of the latching mechanism.”

Continue reading »

Evil Eye Drops 9.5 Tonnes

 Crane, Offshore, safety alert, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Evil Eye Drops 9.5 Tonnes
Aug 242010
 

The crane pennant and the Flemish eye tails which have unravelled and pulled out of the ferruleA badly made Flemish eye crane pennant failed on an offshore installation dropping of a 9.5 tonne load causing what the UK’s Heath & Safety Executive calls “a serious incident. Inadequate testing by the manufacturer and incomplete technical information lead to the Flemish eye being manufactured with a mismatched ferrule/wire rope arrangement.

This incident occurred on an offshore installation during the lifting of a container weighing 9.5 tonnes. A 5 metre long, 15 tonne working load limit crane pennant was connected between the crane hook and the master link on the container sling set. The crane pennant had been manufactured from 36mm diameter wire rope and the eyes on each end had been formed by using the Flemish eye technique. Steel ferrules had been used as the termination and these had been pressed over the Flemish eye rope strand tails. During the lifting of the load the wire rope strands in the tails of the Flemish eye connected to the pennant hook became free inside the ferrule allowing the Flemish eye to unravel and the load to fall. Continue reading »