Feb 182015
 

At about midnight on the evening of 7/8 July 2014 the ro-ro ferry Stena Nautica with 155 passengers onboard suddenly decided it wanted to go hard starboard while departing from Grenaa Port, Denmark. Since she had not cleared the breakwater the result was a contact incident which put holes in her hull below the waterline and much denting. No-one was hurt but to go by the accident investigation by Denmark’s Maritime Accident Investigation Board, DMAIB, it appears to have been another design-assisted accident.

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Jul 212014
 

coronaseawaysOnce upon a time they were called ‘second-hand’ but today it’s fashionable to call them ‘pre-loved’ – old cars and trucks. Unfortunately they come with an increased risk of fire when being transported to their last resting place as the fire aboard the DFDS ro-ro ferry Corona Seaways.

At 0215 on 4 December 2013, a fire was discovered on the main deck of  Corona Seaways while the vessel was on passage from Fredericia to Copenhagen, Denmark. The crew mustered, closed the ventilation louvres, established boundary cooling and operated the fixed CO2 fire-extinguishing system.

Although smoke continued to escape from the louvres, steady temperatures in the vicinity of the fire indicated that the CO2 had been effective in controlling it. At 0640, the vessel entered the Swedish port of Helsingborg, where assistance was provided
by the local Fire and Rescue Service.

The vessel suffered light structural damage and the loss of some minor electrical supplies. Three vehicles and six trailers were severely fire-damaged and other vehicles suffered minor radiant heat damage. The fire was caused by an electrical
defect on one of the vehicles’ engine starting system.

A Renault Premium 250.18 truck had been driven about 240km before arriving at Fredericia and then onto the vessel. Neither the drivers nor stevedores reported any mechanical, electrical or instrumentation issues. However, the truck had not been driven for the previous 11 months and there was no evidence that any checks had been carried out to prove its roadworthiness or general safety, including the integrity of its electrical and mechanical systems.

Existing damage to a battery cable meant that even though the vehicle was parked with the key in the ignition in the Stop/Park position an electrical short, with resultant heating, could still occur, as seems to have happened in this case.

MAIB’s report on the incident says: “The carriage of used vehicles and equipment that do not have appropriate road worthiness certification and whose history and condition are unknown,  brings increased risks when compared with the carriage of well maintained vehicles that are in regular use“.

Although DFDS has fire risk control systems in place that might have prevented such a vehicle fire these oly applied to dedicated car transporters not to ro-ro ferries. Says MAIB: “Contrary to the spirit of the MCA’s Code of Practice and the master’s ‘Unsafe Cargo’  notice, there was no evidence that the vessel’s crew carried out vehicle safety  checks. Neither the SSMM nor the onboard risk assessments covered the carriage of used vehicles and equipment”.

MAIB also noted: Injection of CO2 into the main deck was delayed, allowing the fire to develop, because it took time to establish the fitter’s whereabouts during the crew muster.  The reason why the CO2 fire-extinguishing system apparently failed to discharge the   allotted quantity of CO2 as designed remains unexplained.  The main deck ventilation louvres were not fully closed and some of the crew were   unaware how to correctly operate them. This allowed air (oxygen) to feed the fire and potentially affected the CO2 concentration levels needed to extinguish the fire.  The cargo deck ventilation fans were not operated as required by the current regulations. This increased the fire risk due to the potential build-up of flammable
vapours from vehicles.

Download report

See Also:

Accident Report – Stena Voyager

Green Car Caused Pearl Fire

 

 

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Video: Ro-Ro Trans-Asia Malaysia Listing Before Capsize

 Accident, capsize, fatality, maritime safety news, ro-ro, Sinking  Comments Off on Video: Ro-Ro Trans-Asia Malaysia Listing Before Capsize
Aug 042011
 

This video is from the Philippine Coast Guard Air Group. She is said to have been hit by “big waves” which down-flooded into the engine room, stopping the engine. She listed at 25-35 degrees and eventually sank after passengers and crew were evacuated. The quick emergency response is understood to have been because of a Philippine Coast Guard person onboard who made the call.

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Mar 222011
 

Homeland

One fisherman lost his life when the ro-ro passenger vessel Scottish Viking collided with the fishing vessel Homeland, which subsequently sank. A Safety Flyer which accompanies the investigation report by Britain’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch, MAIB says: “This case highlights the lack of time available to crew in an emergency to locate
and don a lifejacket. Routine wearing of a lifejacket by fishermen when working on deck can significantly improve survivability and detection by the rescue services when a vessel sinks rapidly”. Continue reading »

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Reefers and Spuds Fire Up MAIB Safety Alert

 Ferry, fire, fire safety, fire/explosion, ro-ro, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Reefers and Spuds Fire Up MAIB Safety Alert
Jul 062010
 
image

Connectors overheated and melted

In advance of completion of the investigation into a fire on the vehicle deck of the ro-ro ferry Commodore Clipper on 16 June, 2010, the UK’s Marine Accident Investigation Board says that operators of vessels carrying refrigerated trailer units should take immediate action to ensure that all power supply cables and fittings provided for refrigerated trailer units are in good condition and that electrical protection devices will activate at an appropriate level.

“Until such time as the exact causes of this fire have been established, make additional checks of refrigerated trailers powered by ships’ electrical systems to provide early warning of any overheating”, says the MAIB safety flier.

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