PSA Slaps Statoil For Most Serious Hydrocarbon Leak

 Accident, Accident report, Offshore, Pollution  Comments Off on PSA Slaps Statoil For Most Serious Hydrocarbon Leak
Dec 242012
 
The hydrocarbon leak occurred in connection with the testing of two emergency shutdown valves (ESDVs) on Heimdal’s HMP1 production, drilling and quarters platform. Photo: Norwegian Petroleum Directorate.

The hydrocarbon leak occurred in connection with the testing of two emergency shutdown valves (ESDVs) on Heimdal’s HMP1 production, drilling and quarters platform. Photo: Norwegian Petroleum Directorate.

Norway’s Petroleum Safety Authority Norway, PSA, has notified Statoil of an order after its investigation of a hydrocarbon leak on Heimdal on 26 May 2012. The leak is described as among the most serious for several years on the Norwegian Continental Shelf.

The report identifies serious non-conformities from the regulations which are significant for safety. PSA wants Statoil to confirm that “a lack of effect” is not present on other Statoil platforms.

The hydrocarbon leak occurred in connection with the testing of two emergency shutdown valves (ESDVs) on Heimdal’s HMP1 production, drilling and quarters platform.

To prepare for the test, a pipeline was to be depressurised to the flare. This contained a ball valve with a 16-bar pressure class as the final barrier against the flare. Because it was closed, the valve experienced a pressure of 129 bar.

Gas leak
The pressure caused the seal in the valve flange to fail, resulting in a gas leak estimated at 3 500 kilograms. The initial leak rate was 16.9 kilograms per second (k/s). Gas was detected across a large area of the installation.

This leak ranks among the most serious gas emissions on the Norwegian continental shelf (NCS) for several years. See the RNNP reports on trends in risk level in the petroleum activity for 2001-11. Continue reading »

Buoy Too Close To Fibre Line Led To Wandering MODU

 maritime safety news, mooring, mooring, MSF, Offshore, Offshore, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Buoy Too Close To Fibre Line Led To Wandering MODU
Jul 162012
 

Mooring line No. 5 after the accident

Marine Safety Forum warns that a MODU was moored with eight mooring lines and connected to the well. A loud noise was heard originating from aft, port side column and it was observed on the tension monitoring that the mooring line no. 5 lost its initial tension of 145mT down to 45mT.

The MODU got an excursion of 12 meters from initial position and the MODU tilted 2,3 degrees. Angle on lower flex joint was less than 2 degrees. Ballasting system was run to stabilize the MODU and the thrusters operated in manual mode to re-locate the MODU back to its initial position prior to the mooring line failure.

It was identified some time thereafter that the fiber rope insert in mooring line no. 5 had failed. The triggering cause was that the subsurface buoy shackle/chain came into contact with the fibre rope insert and lead to loss of integrity of the fiber rope insert.

Critical Factors (CF) that lead to the incident:
CF1: Subsurface buoy shackle and chain fastened too close to the fiber line
CF2: Rotational movement of the mooring line lead to the subsurface buoy arrangement getting tangled up into the fiber line (Fig 2)

Recommendations:

1. Install subsurface buoy to the bottom chain segment by “snotter” shackle in a safe distance to avoid the subsurface buoy to reach the fiber line segment connection point

2. Install high tension swivels in both ends of the fiber line insert

3. Evaluate use of swivels during test tension to avoid twist in pre-installed anchor lines

4. Assess the use of ROV survey when the MODU has achieved work tension in the mooring lines

5. All parties involved in the rig move process, is recommended to make themself familiar with industry learning related to mooring line failures and by doing so, bring learning forward in risk assessments and point-out potential weaknesses in rig move documentation issued for review

Rig Specific Corrective Action Plans to be developed, tracked and closed.

Download Safety Alert

OIM Guidance for Offshore Rota and Rest Periods

 fatigue, Offshore  Comments Off on OIM Guidance for Offshore Rota and Rest Periods
Jul 162012
 

Adequate rest is required to ensure that workers are in a state of readiness to execute their duties safely and effectively. This revised guidance intends to set minimum periods of rest between offshore shifts and trips, and set out the maximum days which may be worked depending on the length of shift.

This publication is available free of charge.
Please click here to download a copy.

OIM guidance rest rota.pdf (146 KB pdf)

Safety statistics show fall in leaks and injuries offshore

 Accident, Offshore  Comments Off on Safety statistics show fall in leaks and injuries offshore
Jul 192011
 

"Gulf of Mexico disaster should continue to be a stark reminder of what can go wrong offshore"

Offshore oil and gas leaks that could potentially lead to a major incident has fallen, according to new safety statistics released by the UK’s Health and Safety Executive, HSE.

Figures from HSE show that there were 73 major or significant hydrocarbon releases associated with offshore installations in 2010/11, compared with 85 the previous year. There were 61 recorded in 2008/09 – the lowest since HSE began regulating the industry. Overall, there continues to be a downward trend in the total of all reported hydrocarbon releases offshore.

For the fourth year running, no workers were killed during offshore activities regulated by HSE and 2010/11 also saw a fall in the number of major injuries. There were 42 reported compared with 50 the previous year, bringing the total in line with the average of the previous five years.

The combined fatal and major injury rate fell to 151.8 per 100,000 workers in 2010/11, compared with 192 in 2009/10. There was also a continued fall in the number of minor injuries that led to three or more days off work, with 106 – down from last year’s 110 – which represents a new low in the over three-day injury rate.

There were 432 dangerous occurrences reported in 2010/11, 11 fewer than the previous year. More than a third were hydrocarbon releases (38.9%) and just over a quarter (25.9%) related to equipment failures.

Said Steve Walker HSE’s head of offshore safety:

“This year’s statistics are a step in the right direction. It is encouraging that this is the fourth consecutive year with no reportable fatalities and a reduction in major injuries. But there is still much work to be done. Hydrocarbon releases are a key indicator of how well the offshore industry is managing its major accident risks, and the industry still hasn’t matched or exceeded the record lows of two years ago. Continue reading »

ERRV Contact: Master Unaware of Autopilot

 Accident, Accident report, contact, contact/allison, North Sea, Offshore  Comments Off on ERRV Contact: Master Unaware of Autopilot
Jul 112011
 

Following a man-overboard exercise during which an ERRV has drifted farther than expected from an offshore facility the master, apparently ‘subconsciously’, set the vessel on autopilot. Tidal set put the vessel on collision course with the facility but the master, unaware that the vessel was on autopilot, was unable to regain steering and a contact incident resulted.

Says  Marine Safety Forum, MSF, has issued a report into the accident says: “Recently an ERRV made contact with a fixed installation causing some damage to the vessel and minor damage to the installation. Continue reading »

PSA Orders Shell To Shape Up

 Accident, Accident report, Offshore, Pollution  Comments Off on PSA Orders Shell To Shape Up
Apr 062011
 

Shell's Draugen platform photo: Shell

Norway’s Petroleum Safety Authority Norway (PSA) has given A/S Norske Shell (Shell) a notification of order following completion of the investigation of a well incident on Draugen in December 2010.

The incident on the Draugen facility occurred in connection with a wireline operation in well 6407/9-A-01 on 4 December 2010. Shell was the operator and Seawell AS (Seawell) was the contractor for the wireline operation. The objective of the wireline operation was to replace a gas lift valve. Continue reading »

PSA Calls To Arms Against Leaks and Well Incidents

 Accident, offshore, Offshore, oil, oil pollution, oil spill  Comments Off on PSA Calls To Arms Against Leaks and Well Incidents
Apr 052011
 

Norway’s Petroleum Safety Authority Norway (PSA) has asked the industry to propose specific measures for reducing the number of hydrocarbon leaks and well control incidents on the Norwegian continental shelf.

A very positive trend in the number of hydrocarbon leaks larger than 0.1 kilograms per second was experienced off Norway from 2002 to 2007.

The industry’s goal of reducing the number of leaks of this type to a maximum of 10 per year by 2008 was achieved as early as 2007.

Over the past three years, however, this positive development has unfortunately ceased. The figure rose to 14 in 2008 and 15 in 2009, before returning to 14 last year. Continue reading »

Warning On Chinese Chains

 Accident, China, close call, equipment, Offshore, Offshore, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Warning On Chinese Chains
Mar 302011
 

Two incidents involving chain slings have revealed that chains made by an as-yet unnamed Chinese manufacturer may fail well below their safe working limit. Step Change In Safety has issued an alert on the incident.

On two separate occasions chain slings were used to perform lifting operations. The slings, from the same supplier, failed whilst a lift was being performed.

In the first incident an arrangement of four 5.3 tonne collared chain slings were used in a ‘basket’ configuration around the lifting points of a 20 tonne concrete block. After 5 blocks had been moved using this method team members noticed that one of the chain links had parted at its weld point.

The second Incident invoved two 2-legged 11.2 tonne chain slings to create a 4 point sling arrangement was used to relocate 13 tonne concrete blocks, similar to the first incident, after four blocks had been moved the work party noticed that a link in the chain had failed at its weld point.

The lift plan and slinging arrangement techniques were appropriate for the task. All of the slings were new prior to the start of the operations.

The chain slings were sourced from a single supplier.

It was found that the chains received were certified by batch testing only and it transpired that the name and signature on the certification was replicated by computerised signature and not necessarily the person who actually carried out the inspection or testing, giving concerns as to whether there had been any testing.
The company which bought the chains from a UK supplier has initiated a requirement for all chains purchased to be tested to Safe Working Limit.

All chains recieved from this supplier were immediately placed in quarantine and returned to the supplier, which was instructed to perform an investigation as to why the equipment failed and all similar equipment is recalled awaiting the investigation and report.

The UK based sub-supplier does not manufacture the chain but acts as an agent on behalf of  manufacturers in China, some of whom  do not hold export licences. They have immediately withdrawn all chain from sale supplied by this company, additionally cancelled all orders with this agent and will continue to request the manufacturers details but more importantly the reason for failure.

 

Gullfaks A lifting incident PSA to investigate

 Accident, crush, crushing accident, Offshore  Comments Off on Gullfaks A lifting incident PSA to investigate
Mar 072011
 

Gulkfaks A: worker crushed in lifting op. Photo: Statoilhydro

Norway’s Petroleum Safety Authority, PSA, has initiated an investigation following an incident in connection with a lifting operation on the Statoilhyrdo’s Gullfaks A facility on 28 February 2011.

One person was injured when he was crushed between two containers in connection with a lifting operation on the Gullfaks A facility.

The incident occurred around 06:00 in the morning on Monday, 28 February.

The PSA has decided to investigate the incident, and will send an investigation team to Gullfaks A to clarify the course of events and identify triggering and underlying causes, among other things.