Jan 042013
 

triple5_hook_01

Are your lifeboats complaint with the new SOLAS amendments? If you have not already done so it might be worth a check.
A 2006 study on behalf of Britain’s Maritime and Coastguard Agency concluded :”most of the more serious accidents, particularly those leading to fatalities, occur because of problems with the on-load release hooks… this study has found that many existing on-load release hooks, whilst satisfying the current regulations, may be inherently unsafe and therefore not fit for purpose”.
Amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, SOLAS, aimed at preventing accidents during lifeboat launching entered into force on 1 January 2013.
The amendments, adopted in May 2011, add a new paragraph 5 to SOLAS regulation III/1, to require lifeboat on-load release mechanisms not complying with new International Life-Saving Appliances (LSA) Code requirements to be replaced, no later than the first scheduled dry-docking of the ship after 1 July 2014 but, in any case, not later than 1 July 2019.
The SOLAS amendment is intended to establish new, stricter, safety standards for lifeboat release and retrieval systems, and will require the assessment and possible replacement of a large number of lifeboat release hooks.
Information submitted by flag States on their assessments of existing lifeboat hooks is available on the Global Integrated Shipping Information System (GISIS) under Evaluation of Hooks.

 

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Jan 092010
 

Source: Paris MoU

Nearly a third of ships detained by Paris and Tokyo MoU members from September to November in last year’s concentrated inspection campaign, CIC, on lifeboat launching arrangements had deficiencies dangerous to seafarers aboard them. In a preliminary report, the Paris MOU says that one out of eight lifeboat drills were not carried out satisfactorily.

The findings highlight the poor performance and lack of commonsense and a refusal to substantively address safety issues by lifeboat makers, on-load hook release manufacturers and the industry generally. The Paris MoU has expressed concern about poor boat drills which it says: “is often caused by lack of training… Of the procedures or instructions and identification of hazards associated with launching and recovery of lifeboats one out of 6 was found unsatisfactory. These are related to the safety

management system on board the ship.”

Apart from a lack of concern for seafarers lives on the part of the owners and managers

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Lifeboat Hooks “real progress”

 IMO, lifeboat, lifeboat accidents, lifeboat safety, LSA Code  Comments Off on Lifeboat Hooks “real progress”
Mar 202009
 

Early reports from delegates at the 52nd meeting of the International Maritime Organisation’s Sub-Committee on the design of equipment, DE, indicate that significant progress has been made on lifeboat safety under the Life Saving Appliance Code, LSA.

An industry executive tells MAC that the draft language is ‘satisfactory’, but will still had to be approved by the IMO in plenary session.

The last year’s session was met with severe disappointment by the industry when safety issues fell off the agenda under pressure and was dominated by moves to ensure the existence and profitability of the third-party lifeboat maintenance sector.

Lifeboat accidents have increased dramatically, especially during drills, since the introduction of poorly thought-out on-load release hook regulations. Under the regulations, lifeboat releases were designed to fail into an unsafe condition if something went wrong. Lifeboats are not regarded as ‘people carriers’, like building lifts and equipment used in the offshore industry which must ‘fail to safe’ if something goes wrong.. As a result, failure of the release hooks frequently causes serious injury or death.

Incidents have been blamed on poor training and maintenance by seafarers but poor lifeboat design, unclear signage, badly written manuals, operating procedures, and poorly designed release systems are common.  Counterfeit equipment and ‘copycat’ releases made of under-specification materials are addition factors.

Relevant Podcasts

The Case Of The Deadly Saviour

The Case Of The Killer Catch

The Case Of The Fall From Grace

The Case Of The Fallen Saviour

The Case Of The Church Bell

The Case Of The Errant Hookers

Relevant Posts:

IMO’s hook fails to load

A Real Chance For Lifeboat Changes?

Lifeboat hooks not fit for purpose – Worldwide

Lifeboats – The Pinto Of The Sea

Lifeboats – Who gives a f*** ?

Pesbo response on lifeboats and LSA Code

Pretty scary lifeboat picture

Australian Maritime Safety Authority: Prevention of accidents with lifeboats

Praiseworthy MSC Napoli Crew Knew The Drill

Failed Evacuation – A Canterbury Tale

General Alarm – Hydrostatic Copy-Cats Can Kill

Free Fall Lifeboat Hazards – A Drop In The Ocean

Schatt-Harding – “hooks made of wrong steel”

Freefall release fears shut platform

Mad Rock Gets Lifeboat Hook Award

SafeLaunch

IMO Unveils New Mandatory Seafarer-friendly Lifeboat Design

Your Lifeboat Experiences

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Maritime Safety News Today – 13 October 2007

 life-raft, liferaft, LSA Code, Sinking  Comments Off on Maritime Safety News Today – 13 October 2007
Oct 132007
 

Boat skipper missing
The Northern Echo – Darlington,UK
The skipper of a fishing boat is missing after his vessel was in collision with a cargo ship today. An air and sea search has been launched off the east .

Instability, useless life-rafts contributed to fishing boat
The Canadian Press –
sinking of a fishing boat that resulted in four deaths says the tragedy was compounded by the crew’s inability to free life-rafts as the unstable vessel

Crew of five rescued from ‘sinking‘ ship
Think SpainSpain
They are now safely back on dry land after being picked up by the crew of the ‘Denébola’ coast guard patrol vessel while the ‘Faruk’, which, in the end,

International Maritime Prize Awarded Posthumously

Posted 10/12/07 at 10:27 AM

The prestigious International Maritime Prize for 2006 has been awarded posthumously to Mr. Igor Ponomarev (Russian Federation), who was the serving chairman of IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) at the time of his sudden death in October 2006, age 41, and who had already given distinguished service to the shipping industry in a variety of senior

CJTF-HOA co-hosts Maritime Security Conference in Kenya
By SAMBAZA(SAMBAZA)
“The challenges we face with maritime security are the need for port security, the need to fight and if possible eradicate piracy, enforce compliance with international convention on maritime safety and security, and establish a Coast .

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Sep 202007
 

We emailed Pesbo on August 28, 2007 regarding issues raised in the Valparaiso Star incident:

“The Bahamas Maritime Administration report raises questions regarding the self-righting ability of the boat, the water-tightness of the side-hatches and the design of the on-load release hook – in particular the visibility of the security brake.

Does Pesbo have a view about those concerns? “

The companies response is as follows:

“First of all sorry for late replay due to summer holidays.

REfer to the accident on the Valparaiso Star, pls note that we were not allowed to inspect the lifeboat after the accident and therefore we were unable to report on this matter.

Notwithstanding all PESBO lifeboats comply with the regulations and type approval at the time of delivery. Lack of maintenance, hull damages and others may change the lifeboat’s capabilities.”

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 Posted by at 12:45