Jun 162014
 
rimac

Assumptions led to collision

Merely responding “Okay” isn’t the best way of ensuring that the other vessel actually understands your intentions. And, as Germany’s Bundesstelle für Seeunfalluntersuchung, BSU report into the collision between xontainerships CMV CCNI Rimac and CMV CSAV Petorca near the port of Yangshan, China, shows:  Assume nothing.

Under conditions of reduced visibility at 1148, on 21 June 2011, VTS Yangshan, told the Petorca that she was outside the fairway and that a vessel in the fairway was approaching her. Petorca  acknowledged the information and told the traffic centre that she intended to return to the northern part of the fairway immediately after the outbound ship  passed. She did not mention the ship by name but was referring to the Rimac. VTS Yangshan repeated the information from the Petorca and acknowledged her intentions.

Rimac called VTS Yangshan about 15 seconds later and asked about the oncoming vessel now some 1.5 nm away. The Petorca heard this query and requested the Rimac to maintain her course at 1150. Petorca intended to alter her course a  little further to port. Continue reading »

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Dec 272012
 

closecall

Close calls are an indicator that something is not quite right and can head-off a potential incident but sadly too often go unreported. This safety alert from the Marine Safety Forum, MSF, is a good example of its kind.

In this case the extra Master was not aware that the Chief Officer had misunderstood his order or had understood the order but erred in carrying it out. It is an example of the fact that communication is a two-way street through command and response.

Here is the safety alert: Continue reading »

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Could Maritime English Survive The Two Ronnies?

 communications  Comments Off on Could Maritime English Survive The Two Ronnies?
Dec 272010
 

image English may be the lingua franca of the maritime industry but it does present some challenges even to ‘native’ English speakers. Since the festive season still lurks MAC offers this clip from a television show, the Two Ronnies starring Ronnie Barker and Ronnie Corbett. Not a lot to do with maritime stuff per se, unless one counts Ronnie Barker’s stint in The Navy Lark, but a goo example of communications going wrong. Continue reading »

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Feb 042009
 

From the International Maritime Bureau

To ensure stray bullets do not hit and injure or kill, crew are advised to remain inside the accommodation away from all bulkheads. Further crew are advised to keep fire fighting appliances in a state of readiness at all times in order to fight any fires which may break out during the firing.

  • 27.01.2009: 0636 UTC: (SUSPECTED CRAFT) Gulf of Aden.

A crude oil tanker sighted a suspicious blue-hull speed boat, 10m length with 5-6 people on Hdg 358° Speed 14 kts. Vessel reported the craft to Indian warship in the vicinity. Helicopter deployed by the vessel. The warship later proceeded to the position and arrested the five pirates along with their weapons ammunition.

The Indian navy has identified an area of potential high threat from a pirate attack. The naval ship encountered a concentration of small craft within a 10 nm radius of position 13:39N – 048:55E at 0800 UTC on 03 December 2008.

The boats / skiffs were investigated by the ship’s helicopter. As the helicopter approached

1) The group of skiffs operating together broke off in different directions at high speed

2) Each skiff had more than five people onboard.

All ships are strongly advised to maintain a strict 24 hours visual and radar watch while transiting the Gulf of Aden and off the east cost of Africa (Tanzania,Kenya and Somalia). Early assessment / detection will allow ships to take evasive measures to prevent boarding and request for assistance.

To ensure stray bullets do not hit and injure or  kill, crew are advised to remain inside the accommodation away from all bulkheads. Further crew are advised to keep fire fighting appliances in a state of readiness at all times in order to fight any fires which may break out during the firing.
27.01.2009: 0636 UTC: (SUSPECTED CRAFT) Gulf of Aden.
A crude oil tanker sighted a suspicious blue-hull speed boat, 10m length with 5-6 people on Hdg 358° Speed 14 kts. Vessel reported the craft to Indian warship in the vicinity. Helicopter deployed by the vessel. The warship later proceeded to the position and arrested the five pirates along with their weapons ammunition.

The Indian navy has identified an area of potential high threat from a pirate attack. The naval ship encountered a concentration of small craft within a 10 nm radius of position 13:39N – 048:55E at 0800 UTC on 03 December 2008.

The boats / skiffs were investigated by the ship’s helicopter. As the helicopter approached

1) The group of skiffs operating together broke off in different directions at high speed

2) Each skiff had more than five people onboard.

All ships are strongly advised to maintain a strict 24 hours visual and radar watch while transiting the Gulf of Aden and off the east cost of Africa (Tanzania, Kenya and Somalia). Early assessment and detection will allow ships to take evasive measures to prevent boarding and request for assistance.

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Me no spika da naughty cow Inlish Dept.

 communications, Maritime English, Nautical English  Comments Off on Me no spika da naughty cow Inlish Dept.
Sep 102007
 

North of England P&I Club’s latests Signals gives the story of a a Chief Mate and a wet-behind the ears bridgewatchkeeper that went something like this:

Chief Mate: Can you call all hands for stations at 0230

Fresh faced lad goes away, return 10 minutes later at a loss:

Fresh Faced Lad:  Which cabin is all hands in?

Not only is it a good idea to know what you’re talking about, it’s a good idea to make sure others know what you’re talking about!

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 Posted by at 09:39