MFV Iúda Naofa Sinking: Cause Unknown But Lessons to be learned.

 Accident Investigation, Accident report, fishing, flooding, Sinking  Comments Off on MFV Iúda Naofa Sinking: Cause Unknown But Lessons to be learned.
Jan 192016
 

Exactly why the Eire registered MFV Iúda Naofa suddenly flooded and sank off the Butt of Lewis is unknown, says the Marine Casualty Investigation Board, MCIB. report, but there are still lessons to be learned.

On the 17th January 2015, the Irish fishing vessel MFV Iúda Naofa departed with five crew from Rossaveal in the company of another vessel MFV Star of Hope. By the night of the 19th January 2015 the vessels were 50 miles North of the Hebrides.
On the morning of the 20th January 2015 with full holds the vessels were proceeding towards the Minches with the intention of returning to Lough Foyle. At approximately 09.00 hrs to 09.30 hrs on 20th January 2015, at position 59°16’N 009°34’W, the forepeak bilge alarm sounded on the MFV Iúda Naofa and water was observed in the bilge.

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Nov 202014
 

Sooner or later the chances were that someone was going to be killed aboard the 13.32 metre Irish registered FV Liberty. Given the long list of safety issues uncovered by Ireland’s Marine Casualty Investigation Board, MCIB, and the fact that an earlier incident involving an injury went unreported so the conditions that resulted in the death of a seafarer on 14 February 2013 went undetected, tragedy was inevitable and preventable.

In port at Dunmore East prior to the voyage, one of the trawl nets on the vessel, supplied by the owner, was swapped for a used net supplied by the skipper. The skipper’s net had been kept in storage and had not been used since October 2012. The net was apparently changed because
it was deemed to be more suitable for the intended fishing grounds  where the vessel was going to fish. Continue reading »

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Slave Labour At Sea: Thailand’s Trawlers of Shame

 fishing, maritime safety news, seafarer fatalities  Comments Off on Slave Labour At Sea: Thailand’s Trawlers of Shame
Jun 302014
 

prawnThe cost of frozen prawns is greater than the supermarket price ticket, reveals Bill Redmond, in an industry in which seafarers become slaves/

Thailand’s trawlers of terror shame food supply chains

Logisticians have to cope with many variables in their global supply chains but how many realise how intractable, ubiquitous corruption has the potential to wreck their best laid plans, or appreciate that their purblind directors’ acceptance of corruption issues perpetuates unimaginable misery involving people trafficking, slavery and murder? The reaction of an outraged public to the results of such corruption and crime can quickly lead to global boycotts of JIT-supplied goods and so without a robust plan B already in place to source elsewhere, logisticians will have nightmares. That is why corruption in their supply chains should concern them deeply.

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Denmark – Move Work To Avoid Jank Clank

 Accident, Accident report, fishing  Comments Off on Denmark – Move Work To Avoid Jank Clank
Jan 292013
 
Area if the incident

Area of the incident

Even the best personal protective equipment will not remove the risk of injury from heavy flying objects notes Denmark’s Maritime Accident Investigation Board, DMAIB and the best strategy may be to remove the work from the area of hazard.

Says DMAIB: The fishing vessel Jank (SG 75) departed from Klintholm on 21 March 2012 at 0300 in the morning with two fishermen on board in order to trawl for cod in the Baltic.

During the second haul of the day, the trawl got hold of a submerged obstacle at approximately 1030 in the morning. During the attempts to free the trawl, the stern of the vessel was raised by a sea, and the vertical bolt holding the starboard warp block broke due to the strain from the wire. The warp block therefore fell down hard and hit the fisherman’s left safety boot. When the acci-dent happened, the fisherman was standing close to the warp block and just forward of the trawl drum, where he controlled the wire drum with the levers positioned on the trawl winch drum.

The fisherman’s left foot was severely injured, and he was evacuated to hospital by helicopter.

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Jan 242013
 
Position of when the wave hit.

Position of Nikolai Nedoliz when the wave hit.

A dangerous work practice, lack of knowledge of how to recover a man in the water and no life jacket meant that 35 year-old Nikolai Nedoliz had little chance to survive when a wave swamped the stern of the fishing vessel Zenith i29 miles south east of Kilkeel,

Says the MAIB in its analysis: “Nikolai Nedoliz lost his life while carrying out an intrinsically unsafe task which had become custom and practice on board Zenith over time. The task of manually spreading the bridles and net wings apart during hauling was only carried out to speed up the following shooting process and did not need to be carried out at all”.

The practice of working from the top rail was clearly unsafe, and it was only a matter of time before it led to an accident. Falling from the rail into the sea or onto the deck was not the only danger this task presented; the act of manually pushing bridle wires and net wings apart as they wound on to the net drum could also have resulted in being dragged into the revolving drums.

Other crew members saw the wave approaching from the stern they shouted forcefully to Mr Nedoliz several times to get down from the top rail. However, Mr Nedoliz looked uncomprehendingly at his colleagues and remained in position. The wave swamped the vessel’s stern and carried Mr Nedoliz from the top rail and into the sea.

Mr Nedoliz demonstrated a severe lack of self-preservation by standing on the top rail and ignoring his colleagues’ warning shouts.

A life-ring was thrown into the sea. It landed about 2m from the man in the water, whose face was blue and was swimming weakly was unable to reach it. The vessel was manoeuvred alongside Mr Nedolitz and an attached was made to assist him using a prawn rake. The attempt failed and Mr. Nedolitz sank under the water and did not reappear.

Historically, very few skippers have complied with the regulations regarding onboard emergency training and, as a result, a very small number of fishermen have experienced the benefit of dedicated training and emergency drills on their own vessels. Zenith was no exception to this, and no training or drills for emergencies had been carried out on board the vessel.

MOB retrieval equipment was onboard that might have made the casualty’s recovery easier and quicker, and had been for eight years, but no-one aboard knew it was there. No lanyard was attached to the life ring thrown towards the casualty so he could not have been pulled back on board even if he had reached the ring.

The vessel was not equipped with a boat hook or any other means of holding an incapacitated casualty alongside nor was there plan for the recovery of either a conscious or an incapacitated casualty from the water.

Inevitably, Mr. Nedolitz was no wearing a lifejacket that might not only have kept him afloat the MAIB report: “long enough for rescue but may also have reduced the effects of cold shock on his heart.

Says MAIB: “Although the provision of lifejackets or other PFDs on board Zenith was mandatory, legislatively there was no requirement for the crew to wear one when working on deck. However, that did not prevent the owners from identifying such need under their duty of care, and insisting that PFDs were worn on board their vessels. Zenith’s owners did make inflatable lifejackets available, but made no obligation upon crew members to wear them”.

The MAIB has investigated numerous fatal accidents involving crew going overboard from fishing vessels. A common theme in many of these accidents has been the difficulty the crew experienced in recovering the casualty back on board. A few of the accidents bearing similarities to the one that occurred on Zenith include:

• 9 October 2010, a crewman was dragged overboard by fishing gear from Flying Cloud2. His colleagues had great difficulty in recovering him back on board although he was still alive when initially retrieved alongside the vessel.
• 11 November 2009, a crewman was dragged overboard from Osprey III3. His colleagues were unable to recover him on board despite him being alive alongside the vessel for several minutes.
• 6 November 2009, a crewman standing on a catch sorting tray almost level with the bulwark top rail, fell overboard from Korenbloem4. Two crewmen jumped overboard in rough sea conditions and, with the help of colleagues, recovered the casualty back on board. However, the casualty did not survive.
• 12 February 2009, a crewman was lost from the fishing vessel Maggie Ann5 when he went overboard while standing on a bulwark top rail during a routine hauling operation.
• 13 September 2007, a crewman was dragged overboard from Apollo6. The crew had great difficulty in recovering him back on board despite him being alive when initially taken alongside the vessel.

No form of PFD was worn by any of the casualties in these accidents.

During the period 2000-2011 (inclusive) 34 fatal MOB accidents occurred from UK registered fishing vessels during normal deck working operations7 where the casualties were not wearing any form of PFD.

Read the report

See Also

Wear That Lifejacket, Save Your Family Some Grief

Fishing Fatalities: Time To Stop Shrugging Shoulders

Too Proud To Wear A Lifejacket? Here’s What It Means For Your Family

MFV Janireh Another No-lifejacket Fatality

MCA Urges ‘Wear Lifejackets’

Deadly Bights Are Deadlier Without Lifejackets

MCIB: MOB Mystery, Wasn’t Wearing Lifejacket

Lessons from Bantry Bay fishing tragedy

Patriot: Dead Seafarers Did Not Wear Lifejackets

Ever Elite MOB Fatality – Lessons From A Systemic Death

BSU Releases MOB Report – No Lifejacket, Again

Safety Alert – MOB, Lifejackets, Hazard Assessment and Wear

Will Your PFD Snag?

Does Scottish trawler tragedy highlight call for life jacket redesign?

Flying Cloud MOB Fatality, Separation, Knives and Lifejacket Might Have Saved Life

Booze, Lack of PPE Led To Fatal MOB

 

 

 

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Dec 222012
 
Mr Ruane’s Lifejacket – note lack of adjustment of waist strap.

Mr Ruane’s Lifejacket – note lack of adjustment of waist strap.

Eire’s Marine Casualty Investigation Board has released reports on two separate incidents of note: A fatal accident in which a fisherman became separated from his lifejacket after his small boat came to grief in Lough Corrib, County Galway and the sinking of MFV Jeanette Roberta off Glandore Harbour, County Cork.

In the first case  on 19th March 2012 two men, who were both wearing life jackets, went angling in an 18ft open boat on Lough Corrib. During the afternoon the boat was struck by a large wave and both men were thrown into the water and were separated from the boat. One man swam to an island and eventually raised the alarm. The other man became separated from his lifejacket.

Both men were airlifted to Galway University Hospital by helicopter, one man was pronounced dead at the hospital and the other was reported suffering from hypothermia. Continue reading »

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FV Karen Grounding: Skipper didn’t listen to the Greenhill

 Accident, Accident report, fishing, grounding  Comments Off on FV Karen Grounding: Skipper didn’t listen to the Greenhill
Jun 092011
 

Damaged Karen sternpost

 

When the stern prawn trawler Karen grounded at the entrance to Ardglass Harbour, County Down, Northern Ireland, on 3 January 2011, it could have been a rerun of the tragic grounding of the fishing vessel Greenhill in 2006.In both cases the skipper was absent from the wheelhouse helping the crew process the catch and not keeping a proper lookout.

Says the UK’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch report on the Karen incident: “The investigation has determined that the skipper was not monitoring the
vessel’s passage towards Ardglass harbour when the crew were engaged in processing the catch. It is likely that the skipper was absent from the
wheelhouse for some of that time. There was no watchkeeping alarm fitted in
the wheelhouse and the crew were unqualified. Written risk assessments were inaccurate and incomplete”. Continue reading »

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Alaska Ranger: Poor Maintenance, Poor Regulation Cost Lives

 Accident, Accident report, Alaska, capsize, fishing, flooding, liferaft, seafarer fatalities, Sinking  Comments Off on Alaska Ranger: Poor Maintenance, Poor Regulation Cost Lives
Jan 132011
 

Alaska Ranger

Poor maintenance and inadequate regulatory oversight sank the 58 metre, 1,577 gross tonne, fish-processing vessel Alaska Ranger, cost five lives and led to the biggest rescue effort in US Coastguard history says the newly released US Coast Guard investigation board report. Some 37 recommendations have been made.

One reason for the loss is that there is no single accepted definition of a ‘fish processing vessel’, which enables avoidance by the fishing industry of meeting safety standards. Continue reading »

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Flying Cloud MOB Fatality, Separation, Knives and Lifejacket Might Have Saved Life

 Accident, Accident report, fishing, fishing boat,, Man Overboard  Comments Off on Flying Cloud MOB Fatality, Separation, Knives and Lifejacket Might Have Saved Life
Dec 032010
 

image An MOB fatality might have been avoided by separating crew from the back rope of a fishing vessel while carrying multiple sets of creels; providing knives that can be used quickly in an emergency; and, the wearing of lifejackets or personal flotation devices while working on the open deck says the UK’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch.

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