Jun 132011
 

Petro-chem tanker AlgoCanada

How does ventilating a cargo tank blow-up a ship’s bowthruster compartment? According to Canada’s Transportation Safety Board recently released investigation of the explosion aboard AlgoCanada on 24 July 2009 it went like this:

The apparent wind across the vessel’s bow creatFFull reportull reported an area of lower pressure in the forecastle. This, coupled with the open PV valves, induced a flow of gasoline vapours from the cargo tank into the forecastle through the drying unit and the modified non-return valve. Once the heavier-than-air vapours passed through the tank-drying unit, they settled downward and into the bow thruster compartment.

This compartment contained a heater unit that was automatically controlled by a thermostat, along with electrical lighting fixtures and a ventilation fan, none of which were explosion-proof. Smoke and burn patterns on the electric heater indicated that it was likely the ignition source.

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Aug 022010
 

image The Paris Memorandum on Port State Control starts a concentrated inspection  campaign, CIC, to verify correct damage stability on oil tankers, chemical tankers and gas carriers from 1 September to 30 November 2010.

Says the ParisMOU: “The reasons for this CIC include that inspections showed tankers frequently sailing when not complying with damage stability requirements or had no means of assessing damage stability or were sailing in a loading condition not covered by the approved stability book.

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Sep 082009
 

Crew saved from grounded trawler
Lerwick lifeboat and a coastguard helicopter were dispatched to help the Banff-registered Serenity when she began taking on water.

Rush to avert fuel spill
The Times – Johannesburg,Gauteng,South Africa
The SA Maritime Safety Authority has asked salvors to prioritise the removal with waves crashing over the bow of the casualty ship, and while she rolled

Ship safety sinking, says cruise operator
Brisbane Times
The Brisbane party cruise operator from whose boat the missing Irishman Shane O’Halloran fell at the weekend claims industry regulator Maritime Safety

Aboitiz defies Marina order
Business Mirror
(ATSC) defied the government order grounding its passenger-cargo ships and continued plying its routes on Tuesday. The Maritime Industry Authority (Marina)

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Aug 302009
 

Boat sinks in Indonesia, ’19 dead, 20 missing’
AFP
JAKARTA — An “overloaded” cargo vessel sank on a river on Borneo island on Sunday, killing 19 people with 20 still missing, an official said.

Oil tanker fire in Brisbane
NEWS.com.au
About 12.30am, the Queensland Fire and Rescue Service was called to the Australian-registered ship Palmerston’ when the fire broke out.

Sinking ship triggers alert
Ipswich Evening Star – Ipswich,England,UK
A MAJOR collision between two ships in Dutch waters has been the focusing the attention of coastguards in East Anglia today.

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Aug 182009
 

Vessels ablaze after collision off PD
Marine police and the marine department received an SOS call from the bulk carrier after it caught fire in the collision which occurred at about 9.30pm last

Passengers evacuated after Stockholm ferry fire
The Swedish Wire
“Everyone apart for a few members of the crew has been evacuated… we had a fire on board but after 10 minutes the people on the ship and the fire brigade

Sinking Tug Boat Leaks Oil Near Treasure Island
KTVU.com
The boat’s the sister ship is tugboat moored next to it. The Coast Guard says it was carrying up to 700 gallons of diesel and lubricants. Continue reading »

Aug 172009
 

image

The UK’s Maritime Accident Investigation Branch has released its preliminary investigation into the snagging of a buoy anchor cable by the Marshall Islands-registered tanker King Everest:

King Everest was proceeding from anchorage ‘C’ towards the inbound entrance to the New Sand Hole traffic separation scheme (TSS). The tidal stream was setting south-south-east. On approaching the North New Sand buoy on the vessel’s port side, the master reduced speed and ordered hard-a-port. As the vessel was swinging to port, he reduced the helm order and then conversed with an outbound vessel on VHF radio to arrange a passing manoeuvre. On completing the call, the master realised that he had overshot his intended turn. He attempted to recover the situation using helm and engine movements; however, the strong tidal stream set the vessel down onto the North New Sand buoy, snagging the buoy’s anchor cable on her rudder horn.

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Oct 272008
 

Why is this ship's bell in London's oldest church?

Mariner’s Chapel in London’s oldest church displays the bell of the BP tanker British Trent, a memorial to the nine seafarers who died in a collision and fire off Belgium in 1993. Maritime Accident Casebook”s latest podcast explores why the lessons of the British Trent tragedy remain relevant fifteen years later and tests attitudes towards the criminalisation of seafarers.

Korean bulker carrier Western Winner powered into the port side of British Trent, which had a full cargo of 24,000 tones of gasoline, in thick fog on the morning of 3rd June, 1993. Western Winner holed British Trent’s hull, spilling gasoline which caught fire. Firefighting on British Trent was hampered by a fire main damaged by the impact. Nine seafarers died of smoke inhalation and heat, no casualties were suffered by Western Winner.

Western Winner’s owners attempted to hamper the subsequent investigation. Belgian officials at first laid criminal charges against Western Winner’s master, but later withdrew them.

Says Bob Couttie, writer and narrator of the episode: “One comes away with a sense that even after all this time, there hasn’t been closure for those who lost friends and loved ones on British Trent, nor, perhaps for the survivors. If not for the courage and discipline aboard, the toll could have been far higher. That alone is an important lesson: Training, drills and discipline save lives.”

An investigation by Britain’s Maritime Accident Investigation Branch on behalf of Bermuda identified the cause of the incident as failure to comply with the International Regulations for the Prevention of Collisions at Sea. Western Winner proceeded at an unsafe speed in restricted visibility, did not keep an adequate watch, and there appears to have been no passage plan. There was also a failure to keep an adequate continuous radar watch on the bridge of British Trent.

“This case is a classic example of why colregs are so important to understand and implement,” says Couttie, “It’s also a warning not to make assumptions about what another vessel is going to do.”

Also touched on is the issue of the criminalisation of seafarers. An inquest in the UK found that the death of the victims was an “unlawful killing” by those in command of the Western Winner.

Says Couttie: ”There has to be considerable doubt about the competency of the master of the Western Winner. Some comments about the case suggest that the master should have been tried on criminal charges and punished. The fact is that a certificate of competency doesn’t mean that someone can do the job. I would ask whether those who put him in command without ensuring that he was capable of safe navigation should bear responsibility, too.”

Like all MAC podcasts, The Case Of The Church Bell reveals the circumstance around a real event through an audio podcast and online materials available for free at the Maritime Accident Casebook website, http://maritimeaccident.org.

As with the preceding episodes, the podcast is backed by an illustrated online transcript that seafarers can read, discuss and share with their crewmates and other seafarers. Those with training and safety responsibilities can use the broadcasts and the transcripts freely.

Maritime Accident Casebook, MAC, is a unique, free, informal educational resource, supported by donations, for seafarers and maritime trainers which seeks to empower seafarers through knowledge to keep themselves alive and their ships safe. MAC encourages seafarers to discuss lessons learned from real-life events and apply them to their own vessels and working practices to create a safety-conscious community.

The Case Of The Church Bell

For further information about Maritime Accident Casebook see the website at http://maritimeaccident.org email mac@maritimeaccident.org