Feb 242016
 

When do deficiencies on ships cross the threshold from being a civil wrong to a criminal offence asks Apostleship of the Sea, AoS, port chaplain Reverend Roger Stone. He was speaking at a conference on Modern Slavery in Portsmouth on 10 February.

Stone, AoS port chaplain for the south coast ports in England, says he had seen deficiencies on board ships that clearly contravene health and safety regulations as well as the human and statutory rights of the crew. “This question is one that the shipping industry, port state authorities and law enforcement agencies must seriously consider when it comes to the welfare of seafarers,” he says.
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Jun 302014
 

prawnThe cost of frozen prawns is greater than the supermarket price ticket, reveals Bill Redmond, in an industry in which seafarers become slaves/

Thailand’s trawlers of terror shame food supply chains

Logisticians have to cope with many variables in their global supply chains but how many realise how intractable, ubiquitous corruption has the potential to wreck their best laid plans, or appreciate that their purblind directors’ acceptance of corruption issues perpetuates unimaginable misery involving people trafficking, slavery and murder? The reaction of an outraged public to the results of such corruption and crime can quickly lead to global boycotts of JIT-supplied goods and so without a robust plan B already in place to source elsewhere, logisticians will have nightmares. That is why corruption in their supply chains should concern them deeply.

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Aug 312010
 
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Olivia Jean - keeping the pressgang alive

Look past the UK Maritime Accident Investigation Branch’s comment “From the state of the vessel, and the way in which it was being operated, it could be construed that the owner (of the Annan, Scotland-based scalloper Olivia Jean) was showing a total disregard for the safety and welfare of his employees and share-fishermen on board” and its criticism of the Maritime & Coastguard Agency “In the case of Olivia Jean, the MCA’s ability to establish and impose the regulations has been ineffective, and the owner was able to operate the vessel in flagrant breach of existing regulations” and one comes across just a hint of the dreadful and abusive conditions that applied on the vessels of Olivia Jean Ltd and TN Trawlers.

Set aside the painful hour a seafarer with ribs broken by a parted trawl wire and, at the time, undetermined internal injuries, had to wait until assistance was called for, an the appalling lack of concern for safety, read this extract:

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