Apr 172014
 
ntsbseastreak

NTSB Investigators Morgan Turrell and Christopher Babcock examine propulsion and steering controls on the bridge of Seastreak Wall Street.

By the time the captain of Seastreak Wall Street realised he’d lost control of the vessel it was too late to prevent the vessel colliding with a Manhattan pier at about 12 knots on the morning of January 9, 2013. Of the 331 people on board, 79 passengers and one crewmember were injured, four of them seriously, in the third significant ferry accident to occur in the New York Harbor area in the last 10 years.

The intended maneouvre was a common one among those commanding the Seastreak fleet: Reduce speed and transfer control from one bridge station to another better visibility less than a minute before reaching Pier 11/Wall Street on the East River. However, it left little opportunity to correct a loss of control at a critical moment.

The incident had been waiting to happen since July 2012 when a controllable pitch propulsion system was installed to replace the existing water-jet propulsion along with a poorly designed control panel and alert system, “The available visual and audible cues to indicate mode and control transfer status were ambiguous” says the NTSB. Continue reading »

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Seastreak Investigation Updates

 Accident Investigation, allision, contact, Ferry  Comments Off on Seastreak Investigation Updates
Jan 262013
 
NTSB investigator John Lovell and a representative from the U.S. Coastguard document damage to the Seastreak Wall Street. Photo: NTSB

NTSB investigator John Lovell and a representative from the U.S. Coastguard document damage to the Seastreak Wall Street. Photo: NTSB

Updates have been released by the US National Transportation Safety Board  on the investigation into the 9 January accident in New York City involving the Seastreak Wall Street ferry.

The engine manufacturer has arrived on-scene and investigators were able to download alarm and parametric data stored on engine control modules in each of the two engine compartments. In addition, investigators retrieved video from several onboard cameras. All of this information is being analyzed.

Investigators also tested the vessel’s steering systems and the tests were satisfactory.

The investigative team have started to conduct static testing of the main engines and control systems. Continue reading »

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