Queenland Pilotage – “Systemic Issues” Says ATSB

 grounding, maritime safety news, pilot, pilotage  Comments Off on Queenland Pilotage – “Systemic Issues” Says ATSB
Jan 032013
 
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The grounding of Atlantic Blue sparked the investigation

An investigation into Queensland pilotage operations has revealed “systemic safety issues” says Australian Transport Safety Bureau, ATSB. Under coastal pilotage regulations, no organisation, including the pilotage provider companies, has been made clearly responsible and held accountable for managing the safety risks associated with pilotage operations. This has meant that responsibility for managing the most safety critical aspects of pilotage has rested with individual pilot contractors instead of an organisation that systematically manages safety risk.

The investigation also identified systemic safety issues surrounding pilot training, fatigue management, incident reporting, competency assessment and use of coastal vessel traffic services. Continue reading »

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Oct 152012
 

Graph depicting number of groundings prior to, and after, the introduction of REEFVTS.

Australia’s Maritime Safety Authority, AMSA, has issued a new video on the Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait Vesel Traffic Service, REEFVTS,  available for viewing on the AMSA website. Several high-profile groundings have led to installation of VTS and new procedures for the environmentally-critical area.

Located in Townsville, REEFVTS is a joint initiative of Maritime Safety Queensland (MSQ) and AMSA. It is one of the largest coastal vessel traffic services in the world, monitoring from Cape York to Sandy Cape.

The Great Barrier Reef is recognised all over the world for both its stunning beauty and its environmental diversity. That’s why the International Maritime Organization declared the Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait particularly sensitive sea areas. This means extra care needs to be taken to safeguard the reef from the potential impacts of shipping. Continue reading »

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Rena Grounding: Course Deviations And Pricks

 Accident, Accident report, grounding, maritime safety news  Comments Off on Rena Grounding: Course Deviations And Pricks
Mar 072012
 

Master and Second officer pleased guilty

New Zealand’s Transport Accident Investigation Commission has released an interim report of its independent inquiry into the grounding of the containership Rena on Astrolabe Reef, in the Bay of Plenty, at 2.14am on 5 October 2011.

The incident is said to have led to the worst oil spill in New Zealand’s history.

The report sets out facts of the accident that have been able to be verified to date but does not contain analysis of why events happened as they did or say what could change to help prevent a recurrence. These matters will be covered in the Commission’s final inquiry report.

Today’s report describes how the Rena left Napier and deviated from its intended course as it headed to a 3.00am meeting with the Tauranga pilot boat. The report details how the ship was navigated, including the use of its autopilot, GPS positions, and charts. At 1.50am, the report says, the Rena was on a direct track for Astrolabe Reef. Continue reading »

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