A Little Crush Miss?

 close call, Crane, Safety Alerts, Uncategorized  Comments Off on A Little Crush Miss?
Jun 172009
 

Two ABs working on the main deck of a PSV servicing an offshore installation are lucky to be walking around, following a close call involving the loading of a secion of crane boom according to a safety alert issued by the Aberdeen-based Marine Safety Forum.

Says the safety alert

“A recent high potential near miss occurred on a PSV during the back loading of a crane boom section from an offshore installation. Although no injuries were sustained as a result of this incident, two ABs working on the main deck at this time could potentially have been crushed resulting in 2 fatalities.

“Incident:
At the time of the incident, the PSV was starboard side alongside the installation back loading the second section of a crane boom.

This back loaded crane boom section was first landed on deck with no clearance from adjacent tote tanks. However, the ABs had to pass between these tote tanks and the back loaded crane boom section to access the crane hook for unlatching.

Therefore, the crane operator was asked to move the back loaded crane boom section towards the port side of the main deck to create a gap to allow the ABs clear access.

The crane operator moved the back loaded crane boom section 1-2 meters to port and asked the bridge whether the new position was satisfactory. The Bridge then confirmed with the ABs on deck that this new position was acceptable for them and then advised the crane operator accordingly.

The crane wire was then slackened down and the ABs started to pass between the back loaded crane boom section and the nearby tote tanks to unlatch the crane hook.

The crane operator then started to heave and raised the back loaded crane boom section by about 1 metre to approximately waist height with the ABs positioned between this back loaded crane boom section and the tote tanks. This resulted in a potential for the ABs to be crushed between the back loaded crane boom section and the tote tanks.

The bridge shouted a warning on the UHF radio to the ABs who were already aware of the hazardous situation and were moving to a safe position. The crane operator also then lowered the back loaded crane boom section to deck.

The prevailing weather conditions at the time of the incident were within acceptable working limits, consisting of a wind speed of 19 knots and sea conditions with a significant wave height of between 1.5 and 2.0 meters.

Main Findings and Recommendations:
The crane operator lifted the back loaded crane boom section off the vessel’s deck but failed to effectively communicate his intention to the vessel personnel. The crane operator also assumed that the vessel’s deck was clear of personnel.
The investigation of this incident identified the need to instruct crane operators to:-

• communicate their actions to the vessel before proceeding with lifting operations

• ensure that all communications are fully understood and verified by all relevant installation and vessel personnel before proceeding with any lifting operation

• avoid making assumptions and to verify with the vessel that the deck area is clear of all personnel before proceeding with lifting operations.”

Download the safety alert here

Or read online here:

PSV Cargo Ops Reports "Alarming"

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on PSV Cargo Ops Reports "Alarming"
Aug 212008
 

Marine Safety Forum has received  alarming reports from one of the major offshore crane operators in the North Sea.  They are witnessing a rapid rise in incidents with regards to Cargo Ops with PSVs.  We therefore  would like to remind all members of the following  safety alerts and a Safety Notice which were issued back in 2006 and 2007.

Flotation Collars on Bulk Hoses:

http://www.marinesafetyforum.org/upload-files//safetyalerts/msf-safety-flash-07.05.pdf

Cherry Picking

http://www.marinesafetyforum.org/upload-files//safetyalerts/msf-safety-flash-06.32.pdf

Good Practice – Bulk Hose Handling

http://www.marinesafetyforum.org/upload-files//notices/msf-bulk-hose-handling.pdf

Scaring The Pants Off A Big Rig

 accident reporting  Comments Off on Scaring The Pants Off A Big Rig
Jun 122008
 
If nothing else, offshore oil and gas production platforms can be useful waypoints but there's a good chance you could be scaring the pants off the folk on the rig and its standby vessel and playing havoc with production.

Russell Robertson of Step Change In Safety explained it thusly:

"The problem from the rig / installation side is that at around 20 NM, the vessel which is probably using the unit as a convenient way point becomes, to all intents and purposes, an errant vessel and potential threat because it is on a collision course with the unit.

"The fact that, at around 5 -7 nm, the vessel will change course and go off to ruin someone else's day cannot be assumed by the rig and standby vessel. I just feel that the marine staff on the vessel need to be aware of the disruption that happens on a drilling rig or production unit when this situation occurs."

Despite the resultant havoc, these incidents rarely get officially logged because the vessel doesn't enter the 500 metre zone around the rig or drill ship. Still, there are enough casses of ships clobbering platforms that there's no room for complacency.

So, give a thought to the folk on the rig and help them keep their pants on.