Cyber Threats: Real or Horlicks?

 maritime safety news  Comments Off on Cyber Threats: Real or Horlicks?
Jul 292014
 

The real world of DP2Much is being published abut the potential threats of cyber attacks on shipboard and onshore computer systems. Imaginary or overblown threats are nothing new to marketing. In 1931 beverage company Horlicks used an imaginary condition called ‘Night Starvation’ in a highly successful promotion that ran for decades. Is the threat to ships real or just a Horlicks?

Steve Jones of the Security Association for the Maritime Industry,SAMI, and respected author of several books on maritime security  looks at the issue for Maritime Accident Casebook and says…

 

Cleaning Up your Cyber Hygiene

As the global focal point for maritime security matters, the Security Association for the Maritime Industry constantly monitors the next shipping threats over the horizon. As part of this remit, the Association has turned its attention to the potential cyber threats hidden within the industry.

SAMI recently held a seminar on cyber security, and played host to leading experts, as this most modern of shipping threats came into the spotlight. Given the nature of the threat the true extent of shipping’s cyber vulnerabilities remains uncertain, but the industry is slowly waking to the implications of cyber-attacks. It is increasingly recognising that poorly defended systems pose huge risks, as concerns rise that criminals, pirates and terrorists may target shipping.

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GPS Hacking May Sink Ships

 AIS, ECDIS, navigation, news  Comments Off on GPS Hacking May Sink Ships
Feb 232010
 
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22km difference - results of a jammed GPS

On the left is a picture from an experiment carried out in 2008 by Alan Grant of the UK’s General Lighthouse Authorities. A vessel’s GPS receiver is reporting its position 22km away from its true position because it has been jammed by a device almost anyone can buy off the internet.

The question is probably not will a major incident involve a GPS jammed vessel but when. It highlights the need for seafarers to be familiar with, and competent in, traditional methods of navigation.

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