Beware Counterfeit Charts – UKHO

 Chart, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Beware Counterfeit Charts – UKHO
Feb 192013
 
On the left, a counterfeit product and on the right, an official Admiralty publication.

On the left, a counterfeit product and on the right, an official Admiralty publication.

Counterfeits are everywhere. The UK Hydrographic Office, UKHO, has issued a warning that fake Admiralty charts are in circulation which, because they are not official publications, do not meet carriage requirements of the International Convention on the Safety of Life at Sea (see Chapter V, Regulations 2.2 and 19.2.1.4 of the Convention). Likewise their carriage may not satisfy the requirements of (and may be contrary to) the local laws of Flag State Authorities and Port State Controls.

Says UKHO: “Counterfeit products have not undergone the rigorous checking procedures which take place for official products and they cannot be trusted in the same way. Their use may increase the safety risk to vessels, crews and cargoes”. Continue reading »

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What Happens When The Fuse Blows?

 maritime accidents  Comments Off on What Happens When The Fuse Blows?
Oct 192008
 

Who needs a sextant in these days of GPS, ECDIS, Radar and AIS? To paraphrase the new edition of the Admiralty Manual Of Navigation Volume 1, you might. Launched by the Nautical Institute a century after it first saw the light of day, the revised version of this classic book now covers navigational equipment undreamt of by its first authors but the old reliables still have their place when all else fails.

GPS antennae do get disconnected, as The Case Of The Wandering Monarch demonstrates. AIS equipment sometimes isn’t setup correctly by ‘helpful’ installers, as for ECDIS and radar just two words: “Cosco Busan”., or take a look at The Case Ofr The Triple Cross. When the Admiralty Manual was first published in 1898 one could buy a moderate sized country for the cost of some modern maritime accidents – indeed, the United States purchased the Philippines for $20 million in 1898.

In a foreword to the book Admiral Sir Jonathon Band, First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff points out. “As naval operations, international container logistics and energy supply systems become more globally interdependent, the consequences of any navigational accidents become greater.”

Safe navigation iosn’t enhanced when some bright spark ashore decides to install new equipment and software that nobody on the bridge knows how to use. .Royal Navy Lieutenant Commander Alan Peacock, who revised the manual says:: “This new book retains all the fundamental ‘Principles of Navigation’ so that mariners who rely on the computer-powered equipment found on ship’s bridges today can turn to an authoritative source for support. Without a resource like this, mariners are at the mercy of whatever software happens to be fashionable at the moment… The book is a manual in the true sense of the word. It is there to be used to solve operational problems. It provides both the underlying principles and the modern ways to use equipment and apply safe navigational techniques.”

The Admiralty Manual of Navigation Vol 1, Tenth Edition 690 pp ISBN 1 870077 90 3 is available from The Nautical Institute, price £90 plus postage and packing. Discounts for members of The Nautical Institute and bulk purchasers.

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Website of Note: Tetley’s Maritime and Admiralty Law

 maritime safety news  Comments Off on Website of Note: Tetley’s Maritime and Admiralty Law
Apr 252008
 

Professor William Tetley, Faculty of Law

Professor William Tetley of Canada’s McGill University’s Faculty of Law has an often tongue in cheek site (How to Become a Maritime Lawyer Without Even Trying) and insight into some major cases like the Prestige from a maritime law perspective.

If, like me, you delight in trivia and oddities try this : “If goods on board a ship shall be damaged by rats, and there be no cat in the ship, the managing owner is bound to make compensation. But if the ship has had cats on board in the place where she was loaded, and after she has sailed away the said cats have died, and the rats have damaged the goods, if the managing owner of the ship shall buy cats and put them on board as soon as they arrive at a place where they can find them, he is not bound to make good the said losses, for they have not happened through his default.” Its part of an article  titled “If a ship is lost to a peril of the sea, How Can You Say She Was Seaworthy?” by John Weale, which you’ll find at the Tetley website.

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Website of Note: Tetley’s Maritime and Admiralty Law

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on Website of Note: Tetley’s Maritime and Admiralty Law
Apr 252008
 

Professor William Tetley of Canada’s McGill University’s Faculty of Law has an often tongue in cheek site (How to Become a Maritime Lawyer Without Even Trying) and insight into some major cases like the Prestige from a maritime law perspective.

If, like me, you delight in trivia and oddities try this : “If goods on board a ship shall be damaged by rats, and there be no cat in the ship, the managing owner is bound to make compensation. But if the ship has had cats on board in the place where she was loaded, and after she has sailed away the said cats have died, and the rats have damaged the goods, if the managing owner of the ship shall buy cats and put them on board as soon as they arrive at a place where they can find them, he is not bound to make good the said losses, for they have not happened through his default.” Its part of an article titled “If a ship is lost to a peril of the sea, How Can You Say She Was Seaworthy?” by John Weale, which you’ll find at the Tetley website.

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