Poor Training,Instability, Gave Crown Princess A Lean Time

 maritime safety news  Comments Off on Poor Training,Instability, Gave Crown Princess A Lean Time
Jan 112008
 
The US National Transportation Safety Board has determined that the probable cause of an accident involving the cruise ship Crown Princess was the second officer's incorrect wheel commands, executed first to counter an unanticipated high rate of turn and then to counter the vessel's heeling.

        Contributing to the cause of the accident were the  captain's and staff captain's inappropriate inputs to the vessel's integrated navigation system while it was traveling at high speed in relatively shallow water, their failure to stabilize the vessel's heading fluctuations before leaving the bridge, and the inadequate training of crewmembers in the use of integrated navigation systems.

        "We see from this accident the importance of having adequate training," said NTSB Mark V. Rosenker. "Had the crew been better trained in the equipment they were using, this accident may not have occurred, and implementing our recommendations is one way to help ensure this."         On July 18, 2006, the cruise ship Crown Princess, which had been in service about a month, departed Port Canaveral, Florida, for Brooklyn, New York, its last port on a 10-day round trip voyage to the Caribbean. About an hour after departing, the vessel's automatic navigation system caused the ship's heading to fluctuate around its intended course. Alarmed by a perceived high rate of turn, the second
officer attempted to take corrective action that resulted in the ship heeling to a maximum angle of about 24 degrees to starboard. This caused people to be thrown about or struck by unsecured objects, resulting in 14 serious and 284 minor injuries to passengers and crewmembers. The vessel incurred no damage to its structure but sustained considerable damage to unsecured interior components, cabinets, and their
contents.

        The report adopted by the Board today states that the Crown Princess was operating at nearly full speed when the second officer took the controls. Because of instabilities in the automatic steering system, the officer faced the problem of navigating a vessel that exhibited both increasing course deviations and high rates of turn. The second officer took manual control of the steering and steered back and forth between port and starboard in increasingly wider turns. Rather than remedying the problem, the second officer's actions aggravated the situation, resulting in a very large angle of heel. The captain quickly returned to the bridge and brought the vessel under control by centering the rudder and reducing speed. The Safety Board
concluded that the incident occurred because the second officer initially turned the wheel to port, when he should have turned it to starboard to counteract the turn.

        The Safety Board also stated that the captain and staff captain made errors with regard to the ship's integrated navigation system. These errors included:

*               Failure to recognize that the integrated navigation
system could be unpredictable at high speed in shallow
water.

*               Failure to recognize that the rudder economy and
rudder limit settings on the integrated navigation
system were inappropriate for the vessel's speed and
operating conditions.

The Board concluded that these errors stemmed from inadequate training and lack of familiarity with the integrated navigation system.

        As a result of its investigation, the Safety Board made recommendations regarding integrated navigation system training to the U.S. Coast Guard, the Cruise Lines International Association, and to SAM Electronics and Sperry Marine, manufacturers of integrated navigation systems.

        A synopsis of the Board's report, including the probable cause and recommendations, is available on the NTSB's website, www.ntsb.gov, under "Board Meetings." The Board's full report will be available on the website in
several weeks.
 Posted by at 09:58  Tagged with: ,

US NTSB Meeting On Crown Princess

 maritime accidents  Comments Off on US NTSB Meeting On Crown Princess
Jan 052008
 
   The National Transportation Safety Board will hold a
public Board meeting Thursday, January 10, at 9:30 a.m., in
its Board Room and Conference Center, 429 L'Enfant Plaza,
S.W., Washington, D.C.

        There is one item on the agenda.  The Board will
consider a final report on the following accident:

        On July 18, 2006, the cruise ship Crown Princess,
which had been in service about a month, departed Port
Canaveral, Florida, for Brooklyn, New York, its last port on
a 10-day round trip voyage to the Caribbean. Slightly more
than an hour after departing, while on a heading to
intersect its track to Brooklyn, the vessel's automatic
steering system began a turn to port. During efforts by the
crew to counter the effects of a perceived high rate of
turn, the vessel heeled to a maximum angle of about 24 degrees to
starboard. The heeling caused people to be thrown about or
struck by unsecured objects, resulting in injuries to 298
passengers and crewmembers. The vessel incurred no damage to
its structure but sustained considerable damage to unsecured
interior components, cabinets, and their contents.
 Posted by at 09:33  Tagged with:

Maritime Safety News Today – 17 December 2007

 collision, oil spill  Comments Off on Maritime Safety News Today – 17 December 2007
Dec 172007
 

19 missing after ship collides with China fishing boat: report
ABC Online – Australia
The accident occurred late Saturday off the coast of China’s Zhejiang province, Xinhua news agency said, citing the local Maritime Affairs Bureau.

Caustic soda ship sinking on Yangtze
ABC Online – Australia
Rescue work was being hampered by heavy fog, with little visibility as other vessels tried to reach the sinking ship, according to Xinhua.

Oil spill investigation shows that tugboat crew may have been out
ÇÑ°Ü·¹½Å¹® – South Korea
Officials of the Taean maritime police and Daesan Maritime Affairs and Fisheries Office confirmed on December 14 that no action was taken for more than an

Officer Says He Steered Ship Wrong
The Associated Press –
After the accident, the ship returned to Port Canaveral. At the time of the incident, seas were calm and there was no indication a rogue wave or foul play.

Fishermen arrested over cayuco sinking
Fortnightly Tenerife News – Tenerife,Spain
The vessel is said to have accidentally run down the open boat at dead of night. According to the Mauritanian authorities, the captain and crew,

Mazaruni River
Stabroek News – Georgetown,Guyana
Police said that as a result of the collision which occurred around 8:40 pm, the wooden vessel capsized and some of the men aboard sustained injuries

Cosco Busan Cleared to Leave SF Bay
KRON 4’s Terisa Estacio and Charles Clifford report.

Offloading regulatory responsibilities
By Dieselduck(Dieselduck)
BRISBANE 14 December – A board of Inquiry report into the Wunma incident, in which an Australian ore carrier was abandoned in Cyclone Nelson, has slammed Maritime Safety Queensland (MSQ) for its excessively “hands off” approach