Feb 242016
 

After a joint concentrated inspection campaign, CIC, in September to November last year the Paris and Tokyo MoUs say that confined/enclosed space entry is generally taken seriously by the industry but there is still a way to go.

The Crew Familiarization for Enclosed Space Entry CIC did not lead to an increase in the rate of detentions however the actual compliance, shown in drills, could be better. 7.9% of drills were found to be unsatisfactory.

Continue reading »

Feb 212016
 

Norway’s Petroleum Safety Authority, PSA,  says an improperly adjusted winch brake, which it refers to as ‘vulnerable’, led to the unintentionally launch of a lifeboat from the mobile unit Mærsk Giant at about 05.10 on Wednesday 14 January 2015.

This incident occurred during testing of the lifeboat systems.

During testing, one of the lifeboats unintentionally descended to the sea. Efforts were made to activate the manual brake on the lifeboat winch, but it was not working. The lifeboat entered the water and drifted beneath the unit. The steel wires holding it were eventually torn off.

After the incident, the lifeboat drifted away from Mærsk Giant, accompanied by a standby vessel. The lifeboat eventually reached land at Obrestad south of Stavanger.

Nobody was in the lifeboat when the incident occurred, and no personnel were injured.

The PSA conducted an investigation which established that the direct cause of the incident was a reduction in the braking effect of the brake on the lifeboat winch owing to faulty adjustment. If the manual brake failed during maintenance with people in the lifeboat, or during an actual evacuation, serious personal injury or deaths could have resulted.

Should the lifeboat have descended during an actual evacuation, a partially filled lifeboat could have reached the sea without a lifeboat captain on board. The PSA also considers it likely that people would have been at risk of falling from the lifeboat or the muster area should a descent have started. The potential consequence could be fatalities.

Five nonconformities were identified by this investigation. These related to

  • maintenance routines for the lifeboat davit system
  • training
  • procedures relating to lifeboats and evacuation
  • periodic programme for competent control and ensuring the expertise of personnel carrying out maintenance work
  • qualification and follow-up of contractors.

Mærsk Giant is operated by Maersk Drilling Norge.

PSA Report (Norwegian)

Feb 212016
 

Denmark’s Maritime Authority, DMA, has introduced a requirement for written safety instructions  about good safety procedures when setting and hauling nets.

In general, the safety level on board fishing vessels has improved over the last many years. However, serious accidents still occur. DMA has found that the majority of serious accidents occur in the fishing industry, especially when setting and hauling fishing gear. For example, a fisherman died in 2013 when he got stuck in the trawl while the net drum was operating.

Continue reading »

Feb 212016
 

In this week’s SafeSpace Replay: A ship filled with wheat, a seafarer dead in his cabin, fumigants in the holds but the holds were sealed. Weren’t they?

You might not smell trouble but you might see it coming, even if it wears a mask

 

Listen To The Podcast

Continue reading »

Feb 212016
 

Crew members are responsible for the death of 159 passengers, claims Flemming Thue Jensen

After 26 years of silence, Danish ship inspector, Flemming Thue Jensen, has decided to reveal the truth about the Scandinavian Star tragedy, in which .

General cargo ship Ha Tien 1 sinking in South China Sea

Ha Tien 1 sinking The general cargo ship Ha Tien 1 started sinking after getting water ingress in engine room in stormy weather on 38 nautical miles …

Emerald Belle Cruise Ship Damaged in Fire

Sister line, Scenic, also had a ship under construction nearby but it was quickly moved away so damage was contained to some exterior paint.

Captain of doomed ship said ‘clock is ticking’ in final call

20, 2016, in Jacksonville, Fla., during a U.S. Coast Guard investigative hearing into the Oct. 1 sinking. All 33 aboard died when the ship sank in 15,000 …

Continue reading »

Feb 172016
 

 Cargo ship Amur-2516 collided with ice floe and grounded in Azov sea

The ship is grounded without additional hull damages in northeast Azov sea, but cannot resume voyage until repair and refloating. The local …

Collision in Kiel Canal Causes Damage

An AIS replay of the incident shows Vera Rambow enter the locks before the trailing Nordana Sky struck the vessel from behind after failing to stop.

Coast Guard Probe Into Sinking of El Faro Cargo Ship Gets Underway

The U.S. Coast Guard begins hearings on Tuesday to investigate whether misconduct or negligence were factors in the sinking of the cargo ship El …

Continue reading »

Feb 172016
 

At 2215 local time on 12 August, 2014, the outbound bulk carrier Flag Gangos collided with the berthed oil tanker Pamisos on the Mississippi River at Gretna, Louisiana. Flag Gangos then made contact with a pier at the facility where the Pamisos was berthed, and the pier struck and damaged a fuel barge, WEB235, berthed behind the Pamisos. No one was injured, but about 1,200 gallons of oil that was being transferred at the time spilled from the transfer lines, and some of the oil entered the river. Damage amounts were reported as $16 million for the terminal, more than $500,000 each for the Flag Gangos and the Pamisos, and about $418,000 for the fuel barge.

Yet moments before the steering vanished it appeared to be working fine.

US National Transportation Safety Board, NTSB, investigators discovered the dirty secret of the Flag Gangos,

Continue reading »

Feb 162016
 

MAC has already mentioned one example of a ‘confined space entry incident that wasn’t’ , now another example has been highlighted by the International Marine Contractors Association on an offshore installation.

In both cases, crew were enveloped in an oxygen deficient atmosphere, even though they were in the “open air”, while standing over an open hatch/manhole cover to test the confined space below. In both cases a crewmember was rendered unconscious. Although the were no serious injuries, there is still potential for them.

Here’s the IMCA alert:

“A member has reported a serious confined space incident in which a crew member was injured. The incident occurred during quarterly planned maintenance of the leakage detection system in the base of one of the legs of a semi-submersible accommodation unit alongside fixed production platform.

“A crew member lifted the manhole cover to gain access to the tank to undertake planned maintenance.

The crew member was working next to his supervisor who began to lower gas sampling equipment into the tank as part of normal pre-entry checks. Within a minute of the manhole cover being lifted, the gas sampling equipment (which was 3m down into the 6m height of the tank) gave an alarm, and the crew member lost consciousness.

“Subsequent gas sampling during the investigation was undertaken and recorded unexpectedly high levels of hydrogen. The presence of hydrogen can be explained by the electrolytic reaction between the sacrificial anodes and the steel within the ballast tank below the tank being worked upon.

“The crew member who lost consciousness recovered fully with no residual ill health effects.

The company involved made the following recommendations:

  • Vent ballast tanks regularly in order to prevent hydrogen build-up;
  • Ensure appropriate steps are taken to purge gases from ballast tanks prior to tank opening;
  • Using appropriate equipment, conduct tests for the presence of hydrogen before tank entry;
  • Remain mindful of the potential for build-up of hydrogen in ballast tanks where sacrificial anodes are used;
  • Review gas sampling procedure.”