Hyundai Dangjin: Upsidedown Ladder Aided 2M’s Death

 Accident Investigation, Accident report, ATSB, Australia, falls, fatality, lifejacket  Comments Off on Hyundai Dangjin: Upsidedown Ladder Aided 2M’s Death
Jan 192016
 

Simple, straight-forward jobs often become dangerous ones when safety procedures are overlooked or inadequate. In the case of the ore-carrier Hyundai Dangjin a second mate died after falling into the water from a rope ladder while the vessel was alongside at at Port Walcott, Western Australia.

It was 4.50am and the chief mate and surveyor were on the wharf checking the draught marks. Unable to see the midships draught mark the chief called the second mate by radio and told him to check the mark on the outboard, port side where a rope ladder had already been rigged. Mates are trained to read draught marks.

Continue reading »

Share
Nov 052014
 

Investigations are underway to establish the cause of the sinking of the Fraserburgh-based trawler Ocean Way some 100 miles east of the Farne Islands in the North Sea on Sunday, 2 November, but already a sadly familiar issue has already surfaced: lifejackets were not worn.

Search and rescue efforts to locate two missing crewmembers have been suspended. Two survivors and the body of the deceased skipper were pulled from the water. Neither survivor, nor the body of the skipper wore lifejackets.

A vessel can come to grief with extraordinary swiftness. There may be little time to launch a liferaft or to find and don lifejackets. Without a flotation device the extra effort needed to keep afloat encourages the onset of hypothermia and prevents seafarers helping each other. Continue reading »

Share
Jul 292014
 

lifejacketgasAn autoinflating lifejacket that doesn’t auto-inflate when needed can ruin your whole day. It might be a good idea to check that the gas cylindre on yours is properly screwed in, says MarineSafe Australia Forum

On 7 June, 2014 a worker fell about four metres from the lower landing of an
offshore platform into the sea. He was retrieved from the water without delay by
the crew on a support transfer vessel and transferred to the site clinic for medical treatment.

The  Type 1 Inflatable Personal Flotation Device, PFD. the worker was wearing did not automatically inflate on contact with water despite being equipped with this capability. Inspection of the PFD after the incident identified that the gas canister was not fully screwed into the inflation tube fitting. Continue reading »

Share

Video By Fishermen Says “Wear A Lifejacket”

 lifejacket, maritime safety news, publications, video  Comments Off on Video By Fishermen Says “Wear A Lifejacket”
Mar 022013
 
A still from Lifejacket:

A still from Lifejacket: A Fisherman’s Friend

Two Bridlington fishermen have made a short film to encourage their fellow fishermen to wear lifejackets whilst at sea. The two minute film, entitled “Lifejacket: a fisherman’s friend” is available on Youtube and may be watched below.

The decision to make the film came after a panel of experts* concluded that 26 fishermen could still be alive today had they been wearing a lifejacket when they were involved in an incident at sea (2007-11 figures). The Fishing Industry Safety Group (FISG), were so alarmed by the new statistic that they put the idea of a short film forward to fishermen Dylan Silverwood and Christopher Stewart. They then made the film, with some help from FISG members. Continue reading »

Share
Jan 242013
 
Position of when the wave hit.

Position of Nikolai Nedoliz when the wave hit.

A dangerous work practice, lack of knowledge of how to recover a man in the water and no life jacket meant that 35 year-old Nikolai Nedoliz had little chance to survive when a wave swamped the stern of the fishing vessel Zenith i29 miles south east of Kilkeel,

Says the MAIB in its analysis: “Nikolai Nedoliz lost his life while carrying out an intrinsically unsafe task which had become custom and practice on board Zenith over time. The task of manually spreading the bridles and net wings apart during hauling was only carried out to speed up the following shooting process and did not need to be carried out at all”.

The practice of working from the top rail was clearly unsafe, and it was only a matter of time before it led to an accident. Falling from the rail into the sea or onto the deck was not the only danger this task presented; the act of manually pushing bridle wires and net wings apart as they wound on to the net drum could also have resulted in being dragged into the revolving drums.

Other crew members saw the wave approaching from the stern they shouted forcefully to Mr Nedoliz several times to get down from the top rail. However, Mr Nedoliz looked uncomprehendingly at his colleagues and remained in position. The wave swamped the vessel’s stern and carried Mr Nedoliz from the top rail and into the sea.

Mr Nedoliz demonstrated a severe lack of self-preservation by standing on the top rail and ignoring his colleagues’ warning shouts.

A life-ring was thrown into the sea. It landed about 2m from the man in the water, whose face was blue and was swimming weakly was unable to reach it. The vessel was manoeuvred alongside Mr Nedolitz and an attached was made to assist him using a prawn rake. The attempt failed and Mr. Nedolitz sank under the water and did not reappear.

Historically, very few skippers have complied with the regulations regarding onboard emergency training and, as a result, a very small number of fishermen have experienced the benefit of dedicated training and emergency drills on their own vessels. Zenith was no exception to this, and no training or drills for emergencies had been carried out on board the vessel.

MOB retrieval equipment was onboard that might have made the casualty’s recovery easier and quicker, and had been for eight years, but no-one aboard knew it was there. No lanyard was attached to the life ring thrown towards the casualty so he could not have been pulled back on board even if he had reached the ring.

The vessel was not equipped with a boat hook or any other means of holding an incapacitated casualty alongside nor was there plan for the recovery of either a conscious or an incapacitated casualty from the water.

Inevitably, Mr. Nedolitz was no wearing a lifejacket that might not only have kept him afloat the MAIB report: “long enough for rescue but may also have reduced the effects of cold shock on his heart.

Says MAIB: “Although the provision of lifejackets or other PFDs on board Zenith was mandatory, legislatively there was no requirement for the crew to wear one when working on deck. However, that did not prevent the owners from identifying such need under their duty of care, and insisting that PFDs were worn on board their vessels. Zenith’s owners did make inflatable lifejackets available, but made no obligation upon crew members to wear them”.

The MAIB has investigated numerous fatal accidents involving crew going overboard from fishing vessels. A common theme in many of these accidents has been the difficulty the crew experienced in recovering the casualty back on board. A few of the accidents bearing similarities to the one that occurred on Zenith include:

• 9 October 2010, a crewman was dragged overboard by fishing gear from Flying Cloud2. His colleagues had great difficulty in recovering him back on board although he was still alive when initially retrieved alongside the vessel.
• 11 November 2009, a crewman was dragged overboard from Osprey III3. His colleagues were unable to recover him on board despite him being alive alongside the vessel for several minutes.
• 6 November 2009, a crewman standing on a catch sorting tray almost level with the bulwark top rail, fell overboard from Korenbloem4. Two crewmen jumped overboard in rough sea conditions and, with the help of colleagues, recovered the casualty back on board. However, the casualty did not survive.
• 12 February 2009, a crewman was lost from the fishing vessel Maggie Ann5 when he went overboard while standing on a bulwark top rail during a routine hauling operation.
• 13 September 2007, a crewman was dragged overboard from Apollo6. The crew had great difficulty in recovering him back on board despite him being alive when initially taken alongside the vessel.

No form of PFD was worn by any of the casualties in these accidents.

During the period 2000-2011 (inclusive) 34 fatal MOB accidents occurred from UK registered fishing vessels during normal deck working operations7 where the casualties were not wearing any form of PFD.

Read the report

See Also

Wear That Lifejacket, Save Your Family Some Grief

Fishing Fatalities: Time To Stop Shrugging Shoulders

Too Proud To Wear A Lifejacket? Here’s What It Means For Your Family

MFV Janireh Another No-lifejacket Fatality

MCA Urges ‘Wear Lifejackets’

Deadly Bights Are Deadlier Without Lifejackets

MCIB: MOB Mystery, Wasn’t Wearing Lifejacket

Lessons from Bantry Bay fishing tragedy

Patriot: Dead Seafarers Did Not Wear Lifejackets

Ever Elite MOB Fatality – Lessons From A Systemic Death

BSU Releases MOB Report – No Lifejacket, Again

Safety Alert – MOB, Lifejackets, Hazard Assessment and Wear

Will Your PFD Snag?

Does Scottish trawler tragedy highlight call for life jacket redesign?

Flying Cloud MOB Fatality, Separation, Knives and Lifejacket Might Have Saved Life

Booze, Lack of PPE Led To Fatal MOB

 

 

 

Share

Compact Life Jacket Recall

 lifejacket, lifejacket, Safety Alerts, safety flash  Comments Off on Compact Life Jacket Recall
Jan 072013
 
Yellow means danger

Yellow means danger

If you carry Mullion Compact 150N likejackets check whether the oral inflation tube has a yellow plastic insert. If so, it should be removed from service and returned to Mullion says an alert from the Marine Safety Forum.

Mullion has reported that there is a potential Safety concern with the Compact 150N ISO 12402 Lifejackets, once it is inflated. Mullion has recalled all Compact Lifejackets which have been sold since 1st Dec 2011 if they have a YELLOW valve in the oral
inflation tube.

Compact Lifejackets with a RED valve in the oral inflation tube are not subject to this recall.

The affected lifejackets are being recalled as a precaution for inspection and will either be repaired or replaced.

Advises MSF: “All vessels are requested to inspect the Inflatable Lifejackets carried onboard. Vessel’s that are
equipped with the make and model of Inflatable Lifejackets as described in this Safety Flash
should:
1. REMOVE THE LIFEJACKETS FROM SERVICE WITH IMMEDIATE EFFECT
2. CONTACT the QHSE department to arrange landing/exchange”

For more information, you can call the mullion helplines:

  • UK: +44(797) 11 03 798 – Between 09.00 and 17.00
  • Ireland: +353 87 995 31 92 – Between 09.00 and 17.00
  • International: +32(51) 74 15 21 – Between 09.00 and 17.00

or contact Mullion by e-mail: mullion@sioen.com

Download Safety Alert

 

 

See also

Mullion Recall Programme

Safety Alert – MOB, Lifejackets, Hazard Assessment and Wear

Safety Alert – SEACREWSADER 275N lifejacket secondary inflation failure

 

Share
Dec 222012
 
Mr Ruane’s Lifejacket – note lack of adjustment of waist strap.

Mr Ruane’s Lifejacket – note lack of adjustment of waist strap.

Eire’s Marine Casualty Investigation Board has released reports on two separate incidents of note: A fatal accident in which a fisherman became separated from his lifejacket after his small boat came to grief in Lough Corrib, County Galway and the sinking of MFV Jeanette Roberta off Glandore Harbour, County Cork.

In the first case  on 19th March 2012 two men, who were both wearing life jackets, went angling in an 18ft open boat on Lough Corrib. During the afternoon the boat was struck by a large wave and both men were thrown into the water and were separated from the boat. One man swam to an island and eventually raised the alarm. The other man became separated from his lifejacket.

Both men were airlifted to Galway University Hospital by helicopter, one man was pronounced dead at the hospital and the other was reported suffering from hypothermia. Continue reading »

Share

ERIKA MOB: A Case For Manual Lifejackets

 Accident, Accident report, fatality, fishing boat, lifejacket, Man Overboard  Comments Off on ERIKA MOB: A Case For Manual Lifejackets
Nov 242011
 

Permanent searail installed after the incident

Auto-inflating lifejackets had been abandoned on the seiner Erika because water ondeck repeatedly caused them to inflate. As a result, when a seafarer was swept overboard between a sea rail and a gunwhale  by a sliding seine net at night in cold seas, he stood little chance of survival.

A manually-operated lifejacket might have given him the edge.

Equally important, the incident highlights the need to properly assess the safety impact of changes made to vessels.

The Danish Marine Accident Investigation Board, which had recently released its investigation into the incidents says: “On 27 February 2011, the seiner Erika was fishing for capelin on the fishing grounds west of Iceland. At 21.00 LT, while securing the third throw of the seine for the day, one fisherman fell overboard. The remaining crew were able to recover the fisherman, but he was uconscious, and it was not possible to resuscitate him. A doctor was hoisted on board Erika from a rescue helicopter, and the doctor declared the fisherman dead”.

The report concludes: Continue reading »

Share

Danes Get Strict On Suits And Jackets For Children And Infants

 lifejacket  Comments Off on Danes Get Strict On Suits And Jackets For Children And Infants
Jun 222011
 

New Danish teh. regs for infant lifejackets come into force on 29 June

On 29 June 2011, a new version of Notice D from the Danish Maritime Authority enters into force. You can get an overview here.

The revised version of the technical regulation contains the most recent amendments to regulations on passenger ships engaged in domestic voyages, primarily on the basis of the EU regulations on passenger ships as well as international regulations adopted by the IMO.

The new regulations contain, among other things, requirements for immersion suits as well as requirements for lifejackets suitable for children and infants.

The references to the relevant provisions and definitions regarding high-speed craft have been extended to include the International High Speed Craft Code of 2000 (the HSC Code 2000).

A more detailed overview of the new regulations is available here.

Share