Nov 202014
 

Sooner or later the chances were that someone was going to be killed aboard the 13.32 metre Irish registered FV Liberty. Given the long list of safety issues uncovered by Ireland’s Marine Casualty Investigation Board, MCIB, and the fact that an earlier incident involving an injury went unreported so the conditions that resulted in the death of a seafarer on 14 February 2013 went undetected, tragedy was inevitable and preventable.

In port at Dunmore East prior to the voyage, one of the trawl nets on the vessel, supplied by the owner, was swapped for a used net supplied by the skipper. The skipper’s net had been kept in storage and had not been used since October 2012. The net was apparently changed because
it was deemed to be more suitable for the intended fishing grounds  where the vessel was going to fish. Continue reading »

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Nov 052014
 

Investigations are underway to establish the cause of the sinking of the Fraserburgh-based trawler Ocean Way some 100 miles east of the Farne Islands in the North Sea on Sunday, 2 November, but already a sadly familiar issue has already surfaced: lifejackets were not worn.

Search and rescue efforts to locate two missing crewmembers have been suspended. Two survivors and the body of the deceased skipper were pulled from the water. Neither survivor, nor the body of the skipper wore lifejackets.

A vessel can come to grief with extraordinary swiftness. There may be little time to launch a liferaft or to find and don lifejackets. Without a flotation device the extra effort needed to keep afloat encourages the onset of hypothermia and prevents seafarers helping each other. Continue reading »

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Jun 132014
 
EshcolReport

Tests showed that when the grill was lit the resulting flames were predominantly yellow. The grill was turned off following the activation of a personal gas detector which indicated that high levels of carbon monoxide were being emitted. Close inspection of the grill showed that the grill’s steel mesh was corroded and holed in several places

Two seafarers died of carbon monoxide poisoning whilst asleep on a fishing vessel in Whitby, which demonstrates that lessons over several years, warnings and alerts have had little impact. Poorly maintained equipment being used for purposes for which they were not designed. refusal to use alarms that save lives, on vessel not designed for people to sleep in lead to tragedy.

In the case of scallop-dredger Eshcol the two seafarers went to sleep tired and cold. doors and windows were closed. Heaters on the vessel did not work so to keep warm the seafarers lit the grill on the vessel’s four-year old cooker which had probably never been serviced. Neither the guidance for the installation of gas appliances on board small fishing vessels nor the cooker manufacturer’s instructions had been followed when the cooker was fitted. The metal gauze in the grill was holed and corroded, causing extraordinarily high levels of CO emissions.

Tests showed that when the grill was lit the resulting flames were predominantly yellow, indicating inefficient combustion. The grill was turned off following the activation of a personal gas detector which indicated that high levels of carbon monoxide were being emitted. Close inspection of the grill showed that the grill’s steel mesh was corroded and holed in several places Continue reading »

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John Collins Injury – Solving A Problem Got Foot Chewed

 Accident report, fishing boat,, maritime safety news  Comments Off on John Collins Injury – Solving A Problem Got Foot Chewed
Feb 162013
 
John Collins - prop shaft chewed skipper

John Collins – prop shaft chewed skipper

Jonathan O’Donnell, skipper of the fishing Vessel John Collins is currently recovering from injuries to his foot sustained in an incident which could have led to amputation. Unsafe working practices and lack of effect safeguards led to him being caught up in a rotating propeller shaft says a newly released accident investigation report from Eire’s Marine Casualty Investigation Board, MCIB.

While it was proceeding home the vessel’s bilge alarm sounded and after pumping out the bilge it sounded again shortly afterwards. The skipper went into the fish hold and lifted the covering boards over the bilge containing the pump and the propeller shaft.

The engine was not stopped or put into neutral and the shaft was turning. The skipper put his foot into the bilge beside the turning shaft in order to reach down to clear debris from the bilge pump.

Continue reading »

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Betty G Capsize: Know Where Your Knife Is

 Accident report, capsize, fishing boat,, life-raft, MAIB  Comments Off on Betty G Capsize: Know Where Your Knife Is
Feb 082013
 
Hard to find painter knife

Hard to find painter knife

Know your liferaft – when the beam trawler Betty G capsized on 23 July 2012 the three crew took to the vessel’s liferaft and looked for a knife to cut the painter. They couldn’t find it and one crew member had to go back aboard the trawler to find one. Due to their unfamiliarity with the liferaft they did not know that a knife was secured in a black pocket on the roof of the raft.

A newly-released report from the UK’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch, MAIB, says the vessel capsized as a result of the  load in the starboard trawl net releasing  suddenly. Betty G then progressively  flooded and sank. The crew acted  swiftly and deployed the liferaft, which  ultimately saved their lives. No distress message was transmitted and no alarm was raised, even though the vessel was fitted with an emergency position indicating radio beacon, EPIRB, and an MOB Guardian.

As in other cases, the EPIRB was kept in the wheelhouse and could not float free. To maximise effectiveness, an EPIRB should be registered, regularly checked and serviced, and fitted in a float-free canister with a hydrostatic release. Continue reading »

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Dec 222012
 
Mr Ruane’s Lifejacket – note lack of adjustment of waist strap.

Mr Ruane’s Lifejacket – note lack of adjustment of waist strap.

Eire’s Marine Casualty Investigation Board has released reports on two separate incidents of note: A fatal accident in which a fisherman became separated from his lifejacket after his small boat came to grief in Lough Corrib, County Galway and the sinking of MFV Jeanette Roberta off Glandore Harbour, County Cork.

In the first case  on 19th March 2012 two men, who were both wearing life jackets, went angling in an 18ft open boat on Lough Corrib. During the afternoon the boat was struck by a large wave and both men were thrown into the water and were separated from the boat. One man swam to an island and eventually raised the alarm. The other man became separated from his lifejacket.

Both men were airlifted to Galway University Hospital by helicopter, one man was pronounced dead at the hospital and the other was reported suffering from hypothermia. Continue reading »

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Grounding: FV Moyuna – Skipper Looked For Light That Wasn’t There

 Accident report, fishing boat,, grounding, MAIB, maritime safety news  Comments Off on Grounding: FV Moyuna – Skipper Looked For Light That Wasn’t There
Jul 132012
 

Skipper looked for non-existent light following a dodgy track

When the fishing vessel Moyuna grounded on rocks on 21 November 2011 while approaching Ardglass Harbour she became a hard-taught lesson in navigation. An experienced skipper navigating by eye looking for a green light that wasn’t there and following a historic track on a plotter lost positional awareness at night.

It would have been wiser to use the sectored white light on the North Pier which could have guided him safely but he wasn’t looking for it and it was not marked clearly on the chart plotter.

The green light, the Ardtole Beacon, had gone out that day and the harbourmaster had issued an alert by VHF through the Belfast Coastguard but Moyuna was out of range. Continue reading »

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Mar 082012
 

Marks on Cosco Hong Kong’s bulbous bow

At 0218 on 6 March 2011, the UK registered container ship Cosco Hong Kong collided with the China registered fish transportation vessel Zhe Ling Yu Yun 135. The accident occurred in international waters off the coast of Zhejiang Province, China. Zhe Ling Yu Yun 135 sank almost immediately, with the loss of 11 lives. Cosco Hong Kong was not damaged.
On impact, Cosco Hong Kong’s officer of the watch (OOW) felt an unusual vibration
and immediately put the engine telegraph to stop. He did not see Zhe Ling Yu Yun 135 immediately before or after the collision and he was unaware of what the container ship had struck. Cosco Hong Kong remained drifting in the vicinity for over one hour while the master tried to establish what had happened.  In the absence of any evidence that a collision had occurred, Cosco Hong Kong then resumed passage to Yangshan, China.
The Taizhou Maritime Rescue Co-ordination Centre was notified that Zhe Ling Yu Yun 135 was missing at 2021, 18 hours after the collision. An air and sea search failed to find any trace of the vessel or her crew. The wreck of Zhe Ling Yu Yun 135 was eventually located
on 17 March 2011 close to the position of the collision.

Factors that led to the collision included:

Continue reading »

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Loss Of Skippers Highlights Single Operator Safety: Discovery/Breadwinner

 Accident report, fishing boat,, Man Overboard  Comments Off on Loss Of Skippers Highlights Single Operator Safety: Discovery/Breadwinner
Nov 072011
 

Discovery - unsafe practices cost lives and put her on the rocks

Safety issues on single operator fishing boats have been highlighted by the release of a joint report on MOB accidents involving two such vessels.

The single-handed skippers of FV Discovery and FV Breadwinner were lost overboard in October 2010 and January 2011. Risks were not adequately accounted for in either case.

While there were differences in the circumstances that led to each of these fatal
accidents, both occurred as a direct result of the working practices that were being
used.

There have been 13 recorded fatalities on UK creel fishing vessels since the beginning of 2007, 9 of which were a result of either falling or being dragged overboard with the gear.

Of these 9 fatalities, 7 were single-handed fishing operations, with no one to witness the accident or provide assistance.
Continue reading »

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