Paris/Tokyo Probe Fatigued Seafarers

 fatality, fatigue, Paris MOU  Comments Off on Paris/Tokyo Probe Fatigued Seafarers
Jul 292014
 

moufatigueSeafarer hours of rest come under the microscope from from 1 September 2014 and ending  on 30 November 2014, says a joint statement by the Tokyo and Paris MOUs. A Joint Concentrated Inspection Campaign, CIC, will examine hours of rest records on some 10,000 vessels to see if they bide by STCW 78 as amended including the Manila amendments.

Deck and engine room watchkeepers’ hours of rest will be verified in more detail for compliance with the mentioned scope of the CIC during a regular Port State Control inspection conducted under the regional ship selection criteria within the Paris and Tokyo MoU regions. Continue reading »

Jun 132014
 
EshcolReport

Tests showed that when the grill was lit the resulting flames were predominantly yellow. The grill was turned off following the activation of a personal gas detector which indicated that high levels of carbon monoxide were being emitted. Close inspection of the grill showed that the grill’s steel mesh was corroded and holed in several places

Two seafarers died of carbon monoxide poisoning whilst asleep on a fishing vessel in Whitby, which demonstrates that lessons over several years, warnings and alerts have had little impact. Poorly maintained equipment being used for purposes for which they were not designed. refusal to use alarms that save lives, on vessel not designed for people to sleep in lead to tragedy.

In the case of scallop-dredger Eshcol the two seafarers went to sleep tired and cold. doors and windows were closed. Heaters on the vessel did not work so to keep warm the seafarers lit the grill on the vessel’s four-year old cooker which had probably never been serviced. Neither the guidance for the installation of gas appliances on board small fishing vessels nor the cooker manufacturer’s instructions had been followed when the cooker was fitted. The metal gauze in the grill was holed and corroded, causing extraordinarily high levels of CO emissions.

Tests showed that when the grill was lit the resulting flames were predominantly yellow, indicating inefficient combustion. The grill was turned off following the activation of a personal gas detector which indicated that high levels of carbon monoxide were being emitted. Close inspection of the grill showed that the grill’s steel mesh was corroded and holed in several places Continue reading »

Nicolai Maersk Fatality: Think Before You Crank

 Accident Investigation, Accident report, fatality, maritime safety news  Comments Off on Nicolai Maersk Fatality: Think Before You Crank
Feb 122013
 

crankHolding on to something that revolves at high speed is not conducive to a long life but inattention and a lack of safety instincts can result in the sorts of  incidents covered in Denmark’s Maritime Accident Investigation report on a fatality aboard the Nicolai Maersk on 26 April 2012.

Nicolai Maersk arrived at Jebel Ali, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Shortly after arrival at 1515 hours the ship began loading and unloading containers.

During the stay in Jebel Ali, the ship was to receive lubricating oil both in bulk and in drums. The drums were to be hoisted on board by means of the aft stores crane. The lubricating oil in bulk was to arrive by truck and be pumped on board at the bunker station on the upper deck close to the gangway. Continue reading »

Tug Adonis Capsize/Fatality: Master Knew Risks, Didn’t Recognise Danger

 Accident report, capsize, fatality, tug  Comments Off on Tug Adonis Capsize/Fatality: Master Knew Risks, Didn’t Recognise Danger
Feb 072013
 
Tug Adonis inverted

Tug Adonis inverted

Three important lessons have emerged from the investigation into the capsize of the tug Adonis at Gladstone, Qld on 11 June 2011 says Australia’s Transport Safety Bureau, ATSB: Masters of tugs, regardless of size, need to be actively aware of the signs that a tug might be in danger of capsizing and what to do to lessen this danger;  In multiple tug operations, masters need to plan the passage and consider the speed of the passage and when it is time to release the towline;  It is also essential that masters communicate frequently throughout the passage bring any concerns about speed to the other master’s attention.

On 11 June the harbour tug Adonis, which had four persons on board, was engaged in an operation with a second tug, Wolli, to move an Australian registered unmanned steel flattop dumb barge (Chrysus) in the port of Gladstone, Queensland. Adonis capsized during the operation. Three of the four persons on board escaped but the fourth drowned in the wheelhouse. Continue reading »

E.R. Athina Crush Fatality: The Deadliness Of The Unnecessary

 Accident, Accident report, crush, crushing accident, Fast Rescue Boat/Craft, fatality  Comments Off on E.R. Athina Crush Fatality: The Deadliness Of The Unnecessary
Jan 252013
 
Position of the FRC

Position of the FRC

It seems to MAC that two questions to be asked before a risk assessment could save lives: Is it really necessary to carry out this task right now? Is this equipment being used for its designed purpose? Consider the crushing of a bosun causing fatal internal injuries whilst painting the hull of the  the Liberian registered platform supply ship ER Athina, subject of a new investigation report from the UK’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch.

A small patch of damaged paintwork on the hull needed touching-up. despite the cosmetic nature of the intended work and the safer option of completing the paintwork repair in the sheltered waters of an alongside berth, the master’s decision to proceed with the painting was never challenged.

Since there was to be a fast rescue craft drill it was decided to carry out both tasks at the same time, the two tasks were not separately assessed.

The chief officer led a toolbox talk on the deck adjacent to the port FRC. The talk was attended by the deck cadet, Pjero, and the
OS. The points covered in the talk followed the ship manager’s risk assessment for the launch and recovery of the FRC, and it included the possible hazards and the associated control methods during the various phases of the drill. The risks of painting the port quarter were not formally assessed and, although the task was mentioned in the toolbox talk, it was not covered in any detail. Continue reading »

Jan 242013
 
Position of when the wave hit.

Position of Nikolai Nedoliz when the wave hit.

A dangerous work practice, lack of knowledge of how to recover a man in the water and no life jacket meant that 35 year-old Nikolai Nedoliz had little chance to survive when a wave swamped the stern of the fishing vessel Zenith i29 miles south east of Kilkeel,

Says the MAIB in its analysis: “Nikolai Nedoliz lost his life while carrying out an intrinsically unsafe task which had become custom and practice on board Zenith over time. The task of manually spreading the bridles and net wings apart during hauling was only carried out to speed up the following shooting process and did not need to be carried out at all”.

The practice of working from the top rail was clearly unsafe, and it was only a matter of time before it led to an accident. Falling from the rail into the sea or onto the deck was not the only danger this task presented; the act of manually pushing bridle wires and net wings apart as they wound on to the net drum could also have resulted in being dragged into the revolving drums.

Other crew members saw the wave approaching from the stern they shouted forcefully to Mr Nedoliz several times to get down from the top rail. However, Mr Nedoliz looked uncomprehendingly at his colleagues and remained in position. The wave swamped the vessel’s stern and carried Mr Nedoliz from the top rail and into the sea.

Mr Nedoliz demonstrated a severe lack of self-preservation by standing on the top rail and ignoring his colleagues’ warning shouts.

A life-ring was thrown into the sea. It landed about 2m from the man in the water, whose face was blue and was swimming weakly was unable to reach it. The vessel was manoeuvred alongside Mr Nedolitz and an attached was made to assist him using a prawn rake. The attempt failed and Mr. Nedolitz sank under the water and did not reappear.

Historically, very few skippers have complied with the regulations regarding onboard emergency training and, as a result, a very small number of fishermen have experienced the benefit of dedicated training and emergency drills on their own vessels. Zenith was no exception to this, and no training or drills for emergencies had been carried out on board the vessel.

MOB retrieval equipment was onboard that might have made the casualty’s recovery easier and quicker, and had been for eight years, but no-one aboard knew it was there. No lanyard was attached to the life ring thrown towards the casualty so he could not have been pulled back on board even if he had reached the ring.

The vessel was not equipped with a boat hook or any other means of holding an incapacitated casualty alongside nor was there plan for the recovery of either a conscious or an incapacitated casualty from the water.

Inevitably, Mr. Nedolitz was no wearing a lifejacket that might not only have kept him afloat the MAIB report: “long enough for rescue but may also have reduced the effects of cold shock on his heart.

Says MAIB: “Although the provision of lifejackets or other PFDs on board Zenith was mandatory, legislatively there was no requirement for the crew to wear one when working on deck. However, that did not prevent the owners from identifying such need under their duty of care, and insisting that PFDs were worn on board their vessels. Zenith’s owners did make inflatable lifejackets available, but made no obligation upon crew members to wear them”.

The MAIB has investigated numerous fatal accidents involving crew going overboard from fishing vessels. A common theme in many of these accidents has been the difficulty the crew experienced in recovering the casualty back on board. A few of the accidents bearing similarities to the one that occurred on Zenith include:

• 9 October 2010, a crewman was dragged overboard by fishing gear from Flying Cloud2. His colleagues had great difficulty in recovering him back on board although he was still alive when initially retrieved alongside the vessel.
• 11 November 2009, a crewman was dragged overboard from Osprey III3. His colleagues were unable to recover him on board despite him being alive alongside the vessel for several minutes.
• 6 November 2009, a crewman standing on a catch sorting tray almost level with the bulwark top rail, fell overboard from Korenbloem4. Two crewmen jumped overboard in rough sea conditions and, with the help of colleagues, recovered the casualty back on board. However, the casualty did not survive.
• 12 February 2009, a crewman was lost from the fishing vessel Maggie Ann5 when he went overboard while standing on a bulwark top rail during a routine hauling operation.
• 13 September 2007, a crewman was dragged overboard from Apollo6. The crew had great difficulty in recovering him back on board despite him being alive when initially taken alongside the vessel.

No form of PFD was worn by any of the casualties in these accidents.

During the period 2000-2011 (inclusive) 34 fatal MOB accidents occurred from UK registered fishing vessels during normal deck working operations7 where the casualties were not wearing any form of PFD.

Read the report

See Also

Wear That Lifejacket, Save Your Family Some Grief

Fishing Fatalities: Time To Stop Shrugging Shoulders

Too Proud To Wear A Lifejacket? Here’s What It Means For Your Family

MFV Janireh Another No-lifejacket Fatality

MCA Urges ‘Wear Lifejackets’

Deadly Bights Are Deadlier Without Lifejackets

MCIB: MOB Mystery, Wasn’t Wearing Lifejacket

Lessons from Bantry Bay fishing tragedy

Patriot: Dead Seafarers Did Not Wear Lifejackets

Ever Elite MOB Fatality – Lessons From A Systemic Death

BSU Releases MOB Report – No Lifejacket, Again

Safety Alert – MOB, Lifejackets, Hazard Assessment and Wear

Will Your PFD Snag?

Does Scottish trawler tragedy highlight call for life jacket redesign?

Flying Cloud MOB Fatality, Separation, Knives and Lifejacket Might Have Saved Life

Booze, Lack of PPE Led To Fatal MOB

 

 

 

Rogue Wave In Vos Sailor CO Fatality?

 Accident, Accident Investigation, fatality, rogue waves, Vroon, weather  Comments Off on Rogue Wave In Vos Sailor CO Fatality?
Jan 152013
 
Vos Sailor (Photo: http://www.shipphotos.co.uk/)

Vos Sailor (Photo: http://www.shipphotos.co.uk/)

Aberdeen-based Vroon Offshore has issued a preliminary report on the 15 December 2012 incident in which an apparently large wave smashed through the the storm shutters of the ERRV VOS Sailor killing the vessel’s Chief Officer and destroying the bridge equipment. Eleven crew were successfully evacuated. The vessel was so damaged that it has been scrapped.

Says Derek Leiper, QHSE Manager, Vroon Offshore Services Ltd: “Obviously, we are at a very early stage of investigation, but feel it is important to keep everyone updated on a regular basis”.

At 04:05 the ERRV Vos Sailor was struck by a large body of water whilst on location during heavy weather. The internal of the vessels bridge was completely destroyed along with structural damage to the forward accommodation and both front and back bridge windows shattered.

According to Lieper the Swell height at the time was reported at 12 metres; the vessel had the storm shutters up on all five front bridge windows; the vessel was head to weather, doing approx. 1.5 knots to 2 knots; all storm shields were forced through the forward windows; All bridge equipment, consols and so on were destroyed; all windows across the back of the bridge were shattered from the inside. Continue reading »

Dec 222012
 
Mr Ruane’s Lifejacket – note lack of adjustment of waist strap.

Mr Ruane’s Lifejacket – note lack of adjustment of waist strap.

Eire’s Marine Casualty Investigation Board has released reports on two separate incidents of note: A fatal accident in which a fisherman became separated from his lifejacket after his small boat came to grief in Lough Corrib, County Galway and the sinking of MFV Jeanette Roberta off Glandore Harbour, County Cork.

In the first case  on 19th March 2012 two men, who were both wearing life jackets, went angling in an 18ft open boat on Lough Corrib. During the afternoon the boat was struck by a large wave and both men were thrown into the water and were separated from the boat. One man swam to an island and eventually raised the alarm. The other man became separated from his lifejacket.

Both men were airlifted to Galway University Hospital by helicopter, one man was pronounced dead at the hospital and the other was reported suffering from hypothermia. Continue reading »

Tombarra FRC Fatality: MAIB Tells ILAMA: “Make davit systems/boats safer”

 Accident, Accident report, Fast Rescue Boat/Craft, fatality  Comments Off on Tombarra FRC Fatality: MAIB Tells ILAMA: “Make davit systems/boats safer”
Jul 192012
 

Tombarra

An overstressed fall wire caused the fall of  the fast rescue boat on board the UK registered car carrier, Tombarra, which then plummeted some 29m from its davit into the water below, killing one of the rescue boat’s four crew says the UK’s Maritime Accident Investigation Branch, MAIB. Among the causes was a non-working proximity switch and concern is raised about an overweight fast rescue boat.

The MAIB investigation has identified a number of factors that contributed to the accident, including:

Continue reading »