Nov 262014
 

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All the key ingredients for a navigational accident were in place long before the Malta-flagged oil and chemical tanker Ovit grounded on the Varne Bank in the Dover Strait in the early morning darkness of 18 September 2013. The report on the incident from the Marine Accident Investigation Branch, MAIB, identifies several layers of factors, not all of them on the bridge of the Ovit, that led to the grounding without which it would not have occurred.

The vessel was equipped with a Maris 900 ECDIS supplied and installed by STT Marine Electronics in Istanbul. An installation certificate issued on 1 April 2011 indicates that all systems had been properly configured and tested. They had not.

Continue reading »

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Nov 202014
 

Sooner or later the chances were that someone was going to be killed aboard the 13.32 metre Irish registered FV Liberty. Given the long list of safety issues uncovered by Ireland’s Marine Casualty Investigation Board, MCIB, and the fact that an earlier incident involving an injury went unreported so the conditions that resulted in the death of a seafarer on 14 February 2013 went undetected, tragedy was inevitable and preventable.

In port at Dunmore East prior to the voyage, one of the trawl nets on the vessel, supplied by the owner, was swapped for a used net supplied by the skipper. The skipper’s net had been kept in storage and had not been used since October 2012. The net was apparently changed because
it was deemed to be more suitable for the intended fishing grounds  where the vessel was going to fish. Continue reading »

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Dec 072011
 

On 13 November 2010, Maersk Lancer was to depart from Esbjerg. While taking in the gangway, the lifting wire got stuck in one of the stanchions on the handrail on the gangway.

To get it loose two ship’s assistants entered the gangway and worked with the wire.
When it got loose, the handrail to the shore side fell in a sudden move into stowage position. One of the ship’s assistants lost his balance and fell off the gangway. He was not wearing a safety harness and fall arrest system. He fell approximately 5 metres to the pier.

Denmark’s Maritime Accident Investigation Board notes that the vessel departed earlier than planned and says that “Due to the earlier departure, the Injured Person and the watchkeeping ship’s assistant felt they were in a hurry and under stress… When working on the gangway, the IP normally used a safety harness and fall arrest, but he did not do so on this occasion due to stress and the problem with the lifting wire”.

That lapse under stress happened because a known problem with the gangway had not been fixed: “Due to a problem with the lifting wire getting caught on an eye of one of the stanchions
on the gangway, the IP and the ship’s assistant had to derogate from normal procedures.
The problem with the lifting wire getting stuck on an eye on a stanchion has occurred frequently on Maersk Lancer and is well known in other supply vessels in the company’s fleet using the same gangway system. The problem is usually solved without any problems”.
Download full report
See also

MV Alpha, Uncontrolled ladder descent Killed 3O

Safety Alert – Avoiding Death On The Gangway

Ever Elite MOB Fatality – Lessons From A Systemic Death

EMS Trader: Hazardous Pilot Rig Led To Fatal MOB

Badly-Made Gangway Could Have Killed

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Does Your DSC Know Who You Are?

 equipment, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Does Your DSC Know Who You Are?
Sep 012011
 

A DSC-enabled VHF radio

Does your DSC-enabled radio know who you are? Of course, no rational person would overlook entering an MMSI and connecting to a GPS receiver, but of course, they do, especially recreational boaters.

Warns the US Coast Guard:

As the US Coast Guard’s new marine radio network Rescue 21 becomes operational, rescue centers can now receive instant distress alerts from commonly used DSC-capable VHF marine radios.  However, approximately 90% of VHF DSC distress alerts received by the Coast Guard do not contain position information, and approximately 60% do not contain a registered identity.   The Coast Guard cannot effectively respond to a DSC distress alert sent from such a radio. Continue reading »

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Warning On Chinese Chains

 Accident, China, close call, equipment, Offshore, Offshore, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Warning On Chinese Chains
Mar 302011
 

Two incidents involving chain slings have revealed that chains made by an as-yet unnamed Chinese manufacturer may fail well below their safe working limit. Step Change In Safety has issued an alert on the incident.

On two separate occasions chain slings were used to perform lifting operations. The slings, from the same supplier, failed whilst a lift was being performed.

In the first incident an arrangement of four 5.3 tonne collared chain slings were used in a ‘basket’ configuration around the lifting points of a 20 tonne concrete block. After 5 blocks had been moved using this method team members noticed that one of the chain links had parted at its weld point.

The second Incident invoved two 2-legged 11.2 tonne chain slings to create a 4 point sling arrangement was used to relocate 13 tonne concrete blocks, similar to the first incident, after four blocks had been moved the work party noticed that a link in the chain had failed at its weld point.

The lift plan and slinging arrangement techniques were appropriate for the task. All of the slings were new prior to the start of the operations.

The chain slings were sourced from a single supplier.

It was found that the chains received were certified by batch testing only and it transpired that the name and signature on the certification was replicated by computerised signature and not necessarily the person who actually carried out the inspection or testing, giving concerns as to whether there had been any testing.
The company which bought the chains from a UK supplier has initiated a requirement for all chains purchased to be tested to Safe Working Limit.

All chains recieved from this supplier were immediately placed in quarantine and returned to the supplier, which was instructed to perform an investigation as to why the equipment failed and all similar equipment is recalled awaiting the investigation and report.

The UK based sub-supplier does not manufacture the chain but acts as an agent on behalf of  manufacturers in China, some of whom  do not hold export licences. They have immediately withdrawn all chain from sale supplied by this company, additionally cancelled all orders with this agent and will continue to request the manufacturers details but more importantly the reason for failure.

 

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Fake EEBDs “Useless and Dangerous”

 equipment, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Fake EEBDs “Useless and Dangerous”
Mar 082011
 

The mask hood is impossible to get over your head

Somali gangs are not the only pirate hazard for seafarers, so is copy-cat counterfeit equipment like the fake emergency escape breathing apparatus featured in the latest alert of the Marine Safety Forum.

Says MSF: “WSS Safety service station in Stavanger, Norway received EEBD-sets for annual inspection from one its regular customers. The service engineer discovered that the bags and the EEBD-sets were fake copies of the Unitor/MSA type Uniscape 15H – and of the same type  as previously discovered and informed. Continue reading »

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