Tempanos: Open Hatch + Ice = Fatality

 Accident report, boxship, containership, falls, slips/trips and falls  Comments Off on Tempanos: Open Hatch + Ice = Fatality
Feb 132013
 
Open hatch - a shortcut to etertity

Open hatch – a shortcut to etertity

Walking across open hatches can be an invitation to tragedy. When the hatch cover is icy then the chances for disaster are even greater, as a new report from the UK Maritime Accident Investigation Branch makes very clear.

On 17 December 2011, an able bodied seaman (AB) fell approximately 25m into a partially open hold on the container vessel Tempanos while it was berthed in the port of Felixstowe. The AB, Jose Gonzalez, died of multiple injuries.

There were no witnesses to the accident, but the available evidence indicated that he probably slipped on a patch of ice while walking across a hatch cover that was partially covering an open hold.

The investigation found that it was occasional practice for some crew members on Tempanos to walk across hatch covers above partly open holds. Although there was clear guidance available regarding safe cargo operations on container ships, it was not always communicated to vessels calling at Felixstowe.

Tempanos’s safety management system did not contain sufficient guidance or instructions to the crew about the hazards of walking on partially open hatch covers. A recommendation has been made to the ship’s management company to
review its safe working procedures. The container terminal’s managers have also been recommended to conduct safety meetings with the crews of container vessels prior to commencing cargo work.

Says the MAIB report: “The disparity between the container terminal staff’s understanding of safe working practices and that of the vessel’s crew, illustrates the need for closer co-operation. It is accepted that the container trade relies on fast turnaround times, but achieving the necessary level of co-operation need not be an onerous burden. It was normal practice for container terminal staff to visit the vessel in order to discuss cargo work, and an additional discussion on safe working practices would not add significantly to the turnaround time. Such a discussion should focus on the behaviour expected of the crew and the demarcation of responsibilities.

Download the report

See Also

Hanjin Sydney Fatality: Fix It Before The Fall

Accident Report: BBC Atlantic – Poor Safety Culture Kills CO

Hatch Fatality – Watch Others On Your ship

When One Hand Doesn’t Know What The Other Is Doing It Could Go Down The Hatch.

 

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MSC Siena MOB Fatality: When The Routine Became Risky

 Accident, Accident report, containership, weather  Comments Off on MSC Siena MOB Fatality: When The Routine Became Risky
Feb 112013
 

sienaRoutine is risky. Over the previous two months the crew of the containership MSC Siena had rigged the pilot ladder 30 times. The 31st time, on 17 November 2011 off Fremantle, a man was lost. No risk assessment had been done to take account of the weather conditions says Australia’s Transport Safety Board, ATSB, report on the incident.

The account is harrowing: “At about 1123, as the bosun watched the OS, he saw a ‘large wave suddenly rise up’ and strike the underside of the bottom platform of the accommodation ladder with force (the rope lashing the ladder to the shipside lugs parted). A loud bang was heard on deck and the bosun then saw the OS hanging from his harness rope, under the accommodation ladder’s bottom platform. Seeing that the OS had fallen off the ladder, the bosun began yelling.

“On hearing the yells, the seaman and the cadet looked over the side and saw the OS suspended about 1 m below the bottom platform. He was shouting for help while trying to hold on to the lower part of the pilot ladder. His legs were often submerged in the rough seas which were pounding his body against the ship’s side, the platform and the pilot ladder, and repeatedly breaking his hold on the ladder. Continue reading »

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Burning Flaminia Abandoned – Were Dangerous Containers Declared?

 accident reporting, containership, explosion, fire  Comments Off on Burning Flaminia Abandoned – Were Dangerous Containers Declared?
Jul 152012
 

MSC Flaminia – Was the cargo manifest accurate? Photo: Lampje, MSC Ships Blog

Crew have abandoned the 75,590 tonne German-flagged containership MSC Flaminia following an explosion in a cargo hold.

The incident may again raise concerns regarding the accuracy of container manifests. A similar fire occurred in 2006 aboard the Hyundai Fortune, possibly due to calcium hypochlorite, with secondary explosions from fireworks carried aboard.

Attention may also be paid to the possibility of contaminated gases in reefer units, which caused problems in 2011.

At 10:07 on Sunday Falmouth Coastguard received the relayed mayday broadcast from the German registered MSC Flaminia reporting that the crew on board had abandoned the vessel.

Falmouth Coastguard broadcast an alert to all vessels in the area and the nearest vessel which could provide assistance was the oil tanker DS Crown which immediately changed course to intercept the MSC Flaminia. Six other merchant vessels also proceeded to the location to help with the search and rescue operation but were more than six hours from the location. Rescue helicopters do not have the endurance required to attend an incident of this nature because the vessel is approximately 1,000 miles from land mid way between the UK and Canada.

John Green, Apostleship of the Sea Director of Development says “This tragedy is a reminder of the dangers seafarers face each day to bring us various goods we rely on. Like so many seafarers, the crew on the Flaminia lived a very hard life. But they go to sea because it’s the only way they can provide for their families.”

DS Crown arrived on scene to confirm that the MSC Flaminia was still burning and recovered 24 people from a lifeboat and a liferaft. Four crew had suffered injuries. The injured crew have been transferred to the vessel MSC Stella which will take them to the Azores. One crew member is missing.

The MSC Flaminia is a large container vessel of 75,590 gross tonnage and had 25 people on board. Crew of the MSC Flaminia include German, Polish and Filipino nationals. Weather conditions on scene were winds force 3-4 with a one metre swell.

See Also

International P&I Issues Calcium Hypochlorite Warning

ITF Pleased On Shipper Reaction to Exploding Reefers

Exploding Reefers: The Vietnam Connection

Contaminated/Counterfeit Gas Danger to Reefers

 

 

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Clonlee Grounding: “A minimalistic approach to ISM Code”

 Accident, Accident report, containership, grounding  Comments Off on Clonlee Grounding: “A minimalistic approach to ISM Code”
Apr 112012
 

Refloating of Clonlee at 1000 on the rising tide

What the UK’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch calls “a minimalistic approach …to the objectives of the ISM Code”, combined with a repetitive schedule that produced complacency, a cognitively overloaded Master, an electrical blackout and the lack of manuals for the power supply and distribution system, led to the grounding of the feeder containership Clonlee as she entered the Port of Tyne, England in March 2011.

The bridge and engine room teams did not use the emergency instructions checklist
after the grounding and the engine room team were not aware that the vessel was
aground.

Says the MAIB report synopsis”At 0110 on 16 March 2011, the Isle of Man registered feeder container vessel Clonlee suffered an electrical blackout as she entered the Port of Tyne, England. The ship’s engineers were unable to restore the ship’s power immediately and the vessel ran aground on Little Haven Beach at about 6 to 7 knots. The grounding caused no injuries and the vessel’s hull remained intact. Continue reading »

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Mar 082012
 

At about 1918 on 28 March 2010, a stevedore was crushed between two containers during loading operations on board the container ship Vega Gotland, while it was berthed at the Patrick Terminals’ Port Botany terminal. The stevedore, who was the lashing team leader, died instantly from the injuries he received in the accident.

The ATSB investigation found that the lashing team leader had placed himself in a position of danger and that when a twistlock foundation unexpectedly failed during the repositioning of the container, he was unable to get clear of the swinging container.

The investigation also found that the failure of the twistlock foundation was brought about by an attempt to reposition the container and was consistent with its exposure to gross overstress conditions as a result of the leverage forces applied to it by the container and the unsecured hatch cover.

The investigation identified that while the dangers of working between a moving container and a fixed object were taught to Patrick Terminals’ new employees during their induction training, the issue was not specifically covered or reinforced in the company’s safe work instructions, the hazard identification and associated risk control processes nor, in some instances, followed in practice by stevedores on board the ships in the terminal. Continue reading »

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Mar 082012
 

Marks on Cosco Hong Kong’s bulbous bow

At 0218 on 6 March 2011, the UK registered container ship Cosco Hong Kong collided with the China registered fish transportation vessel Zhe Ling Yu Yun 135. The accident occurred in international waters off the coast of Zhejiang Province, China. Zhe Ling Yu Yun 135 sank almost immediately, with the loss of 11 lives. Cosco Hong Kong was not damaged.
On impact, Cosco Hong Kong’s officer of the watch (OOW) felt an unusual vibration
and immediately put the engine telegraph to stop. He did not see Zhe Ling Yu Yun 135 immediately before or after the collision and he was unaware of what the container ship had struck. Cosco Hong Kong remained drifting in the vicinity for over one hour while the master tried to establish what had happened.  In the absence of any evidence that a collision had occurred, Cosco Hong Kong then resumed passage to Yangshan, China.
The Taizhou Maritime Rescue Co-ordination Centre was notified that Zhe Ling Yu Yun 135 was missing at 2021, 18 hours after the collision. An air and sea search failed to find any trace of the vessel or her crew. The wreck of Zhe Ling Yu Yun 135 was eventually located
on 17 March 2011 close to the position of the collision.

Factors that led to the collision included:

Continue reading »

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Contaminated/Counterfeit Gas Danger to Reefers

 containership, explosion, fire/explosion, Safety Alerts  Comments Off on Contaminated/Counterfeit Gas Danger to Reefers
Nov 072011
 

Reefers: Are they gassed right?

Britain’s Marime and Coastguard Agency has issued an MIN regarding the explosion of compressors on refrigerated containers, reefers, some fatal, following the use of contaminated refrigerant during maintenance.

Says the MCA: “It has been brought to our attention that a small number of incidents have recently occurred where the compressor unit on reefer containers has exploded. The reason for the failure of the compressor units is still unclear but it would appear that the system, after servicing, has been recharged or ‘topped up’ using contaminated gas.

“A number of shipping companies are aware of the issue and are quarantining reefer units that they suspect contain contaminated refrigeration systems”.

UK P&I Club has circulated part of an analysis by Cambridge Refrigeration Technology: “Refrigerated Container refrigeration units should contain polyolester oil and the refrigerant HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane) and should therefore be incapable of exploding.

“Material recovered from the exploded units have been analysed by a laboratory and have found to be corroded by a chlorinated compound. Traces of alumina (AL2O3) were also found at the sites.

“From the above data we can be reasonably certain that the pyrophoric liquid ( burns in contact with air) to be is trimethyl aluminium (Al2(CH3)6). The explanation is that the system has been contaminated with a counterfeit refrigerant containing methyl chloride (chloromethane, CH3Cl). This gas works as a refrigerant but reacts with the aluminium in the compressor forming trimethyl aluminium, which is a liquid at room temperature”. Continue reading »

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Stuffers Put The “Con” In Container

 container accident, containership  Comments Off on Stuffers Put The “Con” In Container
Apr 112011
 
image

MSC Napoli: Stuffed by the stuffers

Overweight containers continue to present a hazard to seafarers and their ships long after the problem was brought out into open when MSC Napoli foundered. Crass excuses continue to made for what BIMCO’s Watchkeeper calls “cavalier behaviour that remains unacceptable” and what MAC would describe as venial greed.

In his latest article Watchkeeper cites a case from the Nautical Institute’s Mariners’ Alerting and Reporting Scheme:

Aboard what was described as a “large” container ship loading at its final port before an oceanic voyage, it was determined by the vessel that there had been “substantial under-declaration” in the manifested container weights being loaded at this port, which was later estimated to average out over the 350 boxes loaded at 12%. Because of this, the ship was judged to be in serious danger of grounding in the draught restricted channel on the way to the open sea.

At the last minute some 850 tons of ballast were temporarily discharged from the vessel’s heeling tanks to enable the ship to sail safely. But it was also discovered that stack weight limits had been exceeded in many of the deck stacks, as so many of these overweight containers had been loaded on the deck stowage“.

Those stuffing these containers are uninterested in the effect this overage will have on the vessel’s arrangements and terminals are reluctant to play their part in resolving it, fearing, possibly, the loss of business to more forgiving ports with less concern for the welfare of ships and their crew.

Says Watchkeeper:

…all too often container terminals seem unable or unwilling to make an issue about overweight boxes, even when these are discovered at the gate or in the terminal. Insufficient effort is made in many countries to persuade those stuffing containers that weights can be critical and should not be exceeded. But all too often the attitude of those who have hired the container is that they can keep loading it until the doors are just able to close. It is just not good enough in 2011.

Absolutely.

Read Watchkeeper

Relevant podcasts:

The Case Of The Bendy Boxer

Relevant Posts:

Dodgy Containers Put Masters, Shipowners At Sea

MAIB: Boxer Missed Opportunity “Regrettable”

Napoli – And There She Was Gone

Container Scams Endanger Seafarers

Napoli – Time To Box Clever

Container Shifters To Get Bloody Knuckles For Napoli Grounding?

MAIB hits container dangers

MAIB Report On The Napoli

MAIB Report On The Annabella


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Costly Container Is A Boffin’ Delight

 Accident, container accident, containership  Comments Off on Costly Container Is A Boffin’ Delight
Mar 092011
 

This shipping container was discovered upside down on the seafloor by MBARI researchers in June 2004, four months after it was lost at sea. Researchers will revisit this site during the upcoming cruise. Image: © 2004 MBARI

Chances are that you’ve forgotten the walloping $3.25 million settlement the owners and operators of the container vessel Med Taipei paid to the United States to resolve allegations that the 15 containers lost overboard in 2004 resulted in long-term damage to the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. The container that was central to that settlement is still at the bottom of the bay, doing its thin at the service of science.

In February 2004, 15 containers fell overboard from the Med Taipei when the vessel was traveling on rough seas from San Francisco to Los Angeles. The containers carrieda variety of cargo – furniture, thousands of tires, several hundred thousand plastic items, miles of cyclone fencing, hospital beds, wheel chairs, recycled cardboard and clothing items. A US Coast Guard report revealed the containers were inappropriately loaded on board the vessel – there were faulty welds on anchor points for the containers, as well as missing d-rings from the deck of the vessel. Continue reading »

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