Jul 082014
 
tundra

A man apart: Fatigue and both physical and cultural differences played key roles in the grounding of the bulker Tundra.

Take one fatigued pilot, add cultural power distance, loss of situational awareness, a dash of unimplemented Bridge Resource Management , inadequate master-pilot exchange and passage planning and there’s a very good change of something unpleasant happening. TSB Canada’s investigation report into grounding of the bulker Tundra off Sainte Anne-de-Sorel, Quebec, is an interesting collection of what-not-to-does.

Groundings in which pilots are involved are among the most expensive. A study by the International Group of P&I Clubs estimated that although groundings only account for 3 per cent of incidents resulting insurance claims of more than $100,000 they accounted for 35 per cent of the cost of claims at a cost of $7.85m for each incident. That compares with collisions, which accounted for 24 per cent of incidents and costs, and fixed and floating object claims which accounted for 64 per cent of incidents but 33 per cent of claims.

There’s money in them thar ills.

When the pilot boarded the Tundra he did not have up-to-date information regarding the buoys he intended to use for navigation. One buoy has been removed, which was not necessarily going to be problem since the next buoy had distinctly different characteristics than the missing device and the pilot would have recognised the situation and adjusted accordingly. He did not have a documented passage plan – his was in his laptop. Continue reading »

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Withholding Accurate Cargo Declarations Threatens Dry Bulkers – Intercargo

 bulk carrier, hazardous cargo  Comments Off on Withholding Accurate Cargo Declarations Threatens Dry Bulkers – Intercargo
May 302011
 
image

A wet stockpile of iron ore

Last year’s loss of three dry bulkers in just 39 days with the loss of 44 lives, many of them Chinese highlighted the confusion, ignorance and deliberate misrepresentation

 

To ship dry bulk cargoes safely it is vital that ship’s masters receive clear, accurate and reliable information on the properties and characteristics of cargoes and the required conditions for safe carriage and handling. This is a SOLAS requirement reinforced in significant detail in the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes Code (IMSBC Code), mandatory since 1 January, 2011. But there is increasing evidence that this is not happening in every case.

The consequences of failing to meet these requirements were seen last year when 44 seafarers lost their lives within 39 days in three casualties: Jian Fu Star (27 October: 13 fatalities); Nasco Diamond (10 November: 21 fatalities) and Hong Wei (3 December: 10 fatalities).

Typical problems experienced by our members include:

Using cargo trade names and not the Bulk Cargo Shipping Name (BCSN);

Confusing cargo identification and correct identification of cargo group – whether a

cargo is a Group A (prone to liquefaction), Group B (representing a chemical hazard)

or Group C (not prone to liquefaction or representing a chemical hazard) – for

example declaring a cargo as a Group C cargo (not prone to liquefaction) but

providing a Transportable Moisture Limit (TML) indicating that the cargo is prone to

liquefaction.

Obtaining accurate and reliable data, particularly moisture content of Group A

cargoes, determined in accordance with IMSBC Code procedures.

Obtaining correct documentation for cargoes not listed in the IMSBC Code. Cargoes

not listed in the Code should be carried under the clear provisions of Section 1.3 of the IMSBC Code, with the competent authority of the port of loading providing the master with a certificate stating the characteristics of the cargo and the required conditions for carriage.

Intercargo believes that these problems stem, in part, from confusion or ignorance concerning the application of the IMSBC Code or in some circumstances malicious misrepresentation.

“If we are to prevent further casualties it is essential that all parties involved in the

transportation of dry bulk cargoes understand and implement the provision of the IMSBC Code, most crucially providing accurate and reliable cargo declarations” says Ian Harrison, Intercargo technical manager.

Issues raised at MSC 89

It is in this context that Intercargo welcomed a proposal from China submitted to the 89th session of the IMO Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) held 11-20 May, in response to the loss of Chinese seafarers in last year’s three casualties. Intercargo submitted a paper, co-sponsored by BIMCO supporting the main proposals in particular: developing a scheme for ensuring reliable independent sampling, testing and certification of cargoes; and enhancing education for ship and shore personnel involved with the shipment of dry bulk cargoes with an emphasis on accurate cargo declarations to ensure only ‘safe’ cargo is loaded.

The MSC agreed to forward these papers for further consideration of the proposals to the Sub-committee on Dangerous Goods, Solid Cargoes and Containers (DSC) that will meet in September 2011.

Intercargo also supported a proposal at MSC 89 to allow more time for the on-going

development and updating of the IMSBC Code through the use of an Editorial and Technical group. The Committee agreed to modify the existing E&T group’s terms of reference (considering IMDG Code amendments) to include consideration of the IMSBC Code amendments.

“We welcome the commitment to safety shown by IMO in dedicating more time to IMSBC Code amendments and the widespread support of member states to consider the development of independent sampling, testing and certification for dry bulk cargoes” added Intercargo technical manager, Ian Harrison.

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Apr 132011
 

Watchkeepers on the bulk carrier Sheng Neng 1 were so fatigued after supervising the loading of coal at Australia’s Gladstone port that they were not fit to carry out a navigational watch, concludes the Australian Transport Safety Board’s investigation into the subsequent grounding.

No fatigue management was in place and the grounding occurred because the chief mate did not alter the ship’s course at the designated course alteration position. “His monitoring of the ship’s position was ineffective and his actions were affected by fatigue”, says ATSB.

The ship’s hull was seriously damaged by the grounding, with the engine room and six water ballast and fuel oil tanks being breached, resulting in a small amount of pollution.

At 1705 on 3 April 2010, the Chinese registered bulk carrier Shen Neng 1 grounded on Douglas Shoal, about 50 miles north of the entrance to the port of Gladstone, Queensland. The ship’s hull was seriously damaged by the grounding, with the engine room and six water ballast and fuel oil tanks being breached, resulting in a small amount of pollution.

Continue reading »

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Transport Malta investigates the grounding of the Maltese ship Oliva

 Accident, accident reporting, bulk carrier, grounding, Pollution  Comments Off on Transport Malta investigates the grounding of the Maltese ship Oliva
Mar 272011
 

Transport Malta is investigating the grounding and subsequent complete hull failure of the Malta-registered Oliva, a 40,170 gross tonnage bulk carrier built in 2009, which occurred on 16 March 2011 at around 0510 local time on Nightingale Island in the South Atlantic Ocean. No injuries were reported and all twenty two crew members on board the vessel are said to be safe. As a precautionary measure, all crew was evacuated from the ship prior to the structural failure. Continue reading »

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Hong Wei: A Victim of Wetness?

 Accident, bulk carrier, Safety Alerts, Sinking, weather  Comments Off on Hong Wei: A Victim of Wetness?
Dec 052010
 
image

A wet stockpile of iron ore

Almost half the crew of the Panamanian-flagged bulker Hong Wei remain missing after the vessel sank in rough weather between Taiwan and the Philippines in an incident which highlights the dangers of high moisture content mineral ore fines. Hong Wei was carrying nickel ore from Indonesia to Dalian port in northeastern China.

It is the second ship in less than a month to come to grief carrying a similar cargo. On 11 November Nasco Diamond sank off the southern coast of Japan with the loss of 21 crewmembers’ lives.

West of England P&I Club has issued a warning to its members regarding carriage of nickel ore.

Continue reading »

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Apr 232010
 

imageAustralia’s Minister for infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government, Anthony Albanese, has announced new measures to protect the Great Barrier Reef. The first of the measures will extend the mandatory ship reporting system.

The system requiring all ships to regularly report their location and route to
authorities, backed up by real-time radio and satellite tracking of their progress, will be extended to the southern portion of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park.

An official announcement says: “This action is based on advice from the nation’s the independent safety regulator, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, AMSA. Once implemented it will improve maritime safety and provide further protection for one of our most precious environmental assets.

Continue reading »

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Iron King – Steering Loss Drills/Training Inadequate

 Accident report, bulk carrier, grounding  Comments Off on Iron King – Steering Loss Drills/Training Inadequate
Oct 122009
 

imageLack of drills and training in procedures to be used in case of loss of steering have been identified as safety issues by Australia’s Transport Safety Bureau, ATSB, in its report on the 31 July 2008 grounding of the bulk carrier Iron King at Port Hedland, Western Australia.

The grounding followed two steering gear malfunctions on the outbound ship. After the incident a technician checked the steering gear rotary vane unit pressure and discovered that the actuator pressure was 75 bar when the rudder was turning to starboard, but only 20 bar when it was turning to port. He
determined that the aft actuator relief valve, one of two valves controlling oil pressure within the actuator, was draining oil from the actuator whenever the rudder was turning to port. As a result, the actuator pressure was being limited to 20 bar, a pressure that was insufficient to provide the torque required to turn the rudder to port when it was under load. The aft actuator relief valve was removed and the technician found that it was sticking. Continue reading »

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That Old Familiar Tired Feeling

 accident reporting, bulk carrier, casualties, China, collision, fatigue  Comments Off on That Old Familiar Tired Feeling
Sep 202008
 

Pit a fatigued, overworked officer keeping a watch alone at night aboard a 68,000 DWT containership weaving his way through fishing boats off the coast of China against a 35,343 dwt bulker which has forgotten to switch on its navigation lightsd, with a wonky AIS, a bridge team that isn’t functioning well, concentrating on those same fishing boats and what you get is this:

That was the collision between the German-flagged boxship Hanjin Gotheburg and the Panama-flagged bulker Chang Tong on 15th September 2007 in the Bohai Strait, the busy gateway to Beijing. Still wedged together like mating mutts, the two ships were towed to calmer waters. Three days later a hurricane separated the two ships and the Chang Tong broke in two and sank.

Chang Tong breaks in two-

-And sinks

The investigation report by Germany’s Bundesstelle für Seeunfalluntersuchung , the Federal Bureau of Maritime Casualty Investigation, has recently been released in English and can be downloaded here.

MAC has looked at fatigue before, in the Case Of The Cozy Captain, and The Case Of The Baffling Bays, among others, you’ll find links to further information on the podcast transcripts page.

Fatigue at Sea , A Review of Research and Related Literature (World Maritime University)

Development of a Fatigue Management Program for Canadian Marine Pilots (Transport Canada)

Fatigue in Ferry Crews (SIRC)

Guide for Maritime Operations (US Coastguard)

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Maritime Safety News Today – 17th July 2008

 accident reporting, barge, bridge, Bridge procedures, bulk carrier  Comments Off on Maritime Safety News Today – 17th July 2008
Jul 172008
 

Bridge Alarms on the Button for Denmark

After the general cargo ship KAREN DANIELSEN collided with the Great Belt Bridge in 2005, Denmark and the Bahamas submitted a proposal to the UN’s International Maritime Organization (IMO) on a carriage requirement for a bridge navigational watch alarm system. The system triggers an alarm if the OOW is incapacitated, e.g. has fallen asleep. The significance of such a system was once again made topical with the collisions off the Danish island Bornholm earlier this year.

Based on the Danish proposal the IMO Sub-Committee for Safety of Navigation (NAV) agreed to forward the proposal to the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC). MSC is now to decide if new ships must be equipped with a bridge navigational watch alarm system as of 1 July 2011. With regards to existing ships, the Sub-Committee agreed that, the equipment should be installed in connection with the first survey after 1 July 2012. The same applies to other ships over 3,000 GT. Ships below 500 GT and 150 GT the deadline for installation is 1 July 2013 and 1 July 2014 respectively.

The proposal from the Sub-Committee is now pending the approval by the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) at its session in November this year. Since it is a matter of new mandatory regulations, the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) stipulates a number of provisions on the coming into force of the regulations, which leads to the above mentioned phasing in of the requirement on a bridge navigational watch alarm system.

Relevant podcasts

The Case Of the Cozy Captain

The Case Of the Seductive Sim

News Headlines

UK – caution advised during planned strike weekend

The UK Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) issued a press notice advising mariners in UK waters to exercise caution this weekend (July 18-20) during the planned strike by some MCA employees.

Official: Norwegian ship hijacked by pirates in Nigeria, released
International Herald Tribune – France
Solberg says Wednesday’s incident aboard has been reported to the International Maritime Bureau’s Piracy Reporting Center in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Barge Collision: 400 Tonnes of Diesel Spilled in Elbe River Germany
By OldSailor
How super absorbent Imbiber beads contain oil and chemical spills at sea; Vessel of opportunity skimming system for pollution response; Nanowire membranes of MIT to absorb and recover oil from oil spills at sea

Cruise Ship Passengers Rescued After Fall From Princess Cruise Liner
Lawfuel (press release) – Wellington,New Zealand
According to reports by Princess Cruise Line accident lawyers at Ehline Law, a spokes person for Crown Princess, Julie Benson have released information in .

Cruise Ship With 1200 Passengers Detained After Discrepancies Found
By cgnews
Further investigation by the Coast Guard team identified 66 discrepancies such as fire safety, lifeboat damages and life jacket issues on the vessel during an inspection that lasted from Sunday morning to Tuesday evening.

High drama as office goes up in smoke
Glebe – Sydney,Australia
“We thought the ship was on fire; it was very dramatic,” he said. “The smoke was thick and black, as high as a city skyscraper, and the flames were probably

Barge Collision: 400 Tonnes of Diesel Spilled in Elbe River Germany
By OldSailor
How super absorbent Imbiber beads contain oil and chemical spills at sea; Vessel of opportunity skimming system for pollution response; Nanowire membranes of MIT to absorb and recover oil from oil spills at sea

TASK FORCE HANJIN MEMBERS QUIT AFTER DEATH OF 13th WORKER
Philippine Headline News – Manila,Philippines
Gamolo succumbed to injuries the following day, making him the 13th fatality at the shipbuilding facility since it was established in Subic in 2006.

St. Louis – river re-opened to all traffic

The US Coast Guard issued a press release stating that, with the abatement of high water conditions, the Upper Mississippi River at St. Louis has been re-opened to traffic without restrictions.

Sulpicio fires 136 from 8 vessels
Sun.Star – Philippines
Suazo said he already submitted to the Marina Board a partial report of the audit conducted by a Manila team that he created shortly after the sinking of

Stern-wheeler Jean Mary Successfully Removed From the Water
By cgnews
Jack Perkins, the vessel master, was aboard the 80-foot stern-wheeler at the time of the sinking and immediately notified the Coast Guard when he noticed the vessel taking on water. The vessel sank Sunday morning in approximately

Tall ship carries unusual crew »»
The Independent Online – Brighton,Ontario,Canada
The Brigantine are seeking leads on fire extinguishers, marine varnish, paint, brushes, mahogany and quarter-sawn Douglas Fir for the decks. .

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