Apr 292015

New Zealand’s fishing firm Talleys Group Ltd has been fined $48,000 and ordered to pay $35,000 in reparation to the family of a crewman killed after falling nearly 7m on the vessel Capt MJ Souza in Nelson in May 2012. Crewman Cain Adams died after he stepped onto a hatch on the main deck that rotated, causing him to fall nearly 6.9m through another open hatch in the deck below to the floor of the vessel’s fish well.

The company was sentenced in Nelson District Court on 29 April after being found guilty in March of failing to take all practicable steps to ensure the safety of its employees after the death of crewman Cain Adams.

The reparations ordered are in addition to a payment of $54,000 already made to the family by the company. Continue reading »

Apr 292015

Something is deeply wrong with an industry in which so many can die so often in tragedies entirely avoidable.  One death, three injured and one escape from a hold containing wood pellets aboard the Polish-flagged bulker Corina this week brings the number of confined space casualties to eleven within the past month. Such losses are unacceptable. Continue reading »

Apr 272015

Explosions aboard bulkers loaded at Grande Do Sul, Brazil, are believed to have involved phosphine fumigants, warns the North of England P&I club, Nepia. Those vessels undergoing fumigation at Rio Grande Do Sul should contact the local agents or P&I correspondents for advice on the current situation with respect to fumigants.

Most incidents involving phosphine tablets, colloquially known in Latin America as ‘tablets of love‘,

One potential cause of a phosphine fumigant explosion may be contaminated tablets of aluminium phosphide or similar fumigants. Tablets react with moisture to produce phosphine gas, PH3, which has an autoignition temperature of 38 Celsius However, the presence of impurities, particularly diphosphine, often causes PH3 gas to ignite spontaneously at room temperature and to form explosive mixtures at concentrations greater than 1.8% by volume in air. The spontaneous ignition behaviour of PH 3 gas is very unpredictable. Continue reading »

Apr 102015

Following the deaths of two ship’s officers aboard the general cargo ship Sally Ann C off the West African coast seafarer’s union Nautilus International has called for the UK to lead a ‘new and concerted drive to end the appalling litany’ of seafarer fatalities in enclosed spaces.

Investigations into the incident – which took place off the coast of west Africa – are underway, but it is known that the chief officer and chief engineer died after entering a hold where timber was stowed and the second officer had to be rescued after losing consciousness when he went to the aid of his colleagues. Continue reading »

Apr 082015

In an unprecedented move Maersk has released CCTV footage of an engineroom fire aboard Maersk Iowa to help determine the cause of the fire. The footage was posted on the gCaptain site.

A statement from Maersk, published by gCaptain says: “The video footage (posted on gCaptain today) depicts the mechanical failure of a main engine air start valve resulting in an explosion and fire in the engine room of the Maersk Iowa while underway on January 10th, 2015. No one was injured by this incident, and thanks to the quick and professional emergency response of the officers and crew, any potential further damage was contained with no harm to the environment. The Company has shared this particular video footage with the USCG, Lloyd’s Register and other internal and external stakeholders in an effort to understand its root cause for implementing corrective action across our fleet. The video has also been shared with our ships crews’ as a training aid.”

Video below
Continue reading »

Apr 082015

When it comes to safe navigation,
if you don’t ask a question right
you’re not asking the right question and
you won’t get the right answer.

Read the transcript

Continue reading »

Apr 082015

Two men were saved when the tug Asterix capsized while unberthing a chemical tanker at Fawley Refinery. The incident, currently under investigation by the UK’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch, is a reminder of the speed with which the enormous forces involved in ship handling can cause a tug to girt, giving crew little chance to escape, as the video below, from an incident investigated by Canada’s Transport Safety Board, shows.

Continue reading »

Apr 032015
Figure 1

Safety Digest from the UK’s Marine Accident Investigation Branch, MAIB, frequently covers the more unusual ways of causing grief aboard ship and the latest issue is no disappointment: It reports and incident in which a vessel was flooded by own freshwater tank.
Says MAIB: “Poor planning and lack of procedures led to approximately 100 cubic metres of fresh water flooding accommodation and machinery compartments on board a large cargo ship.”
Continue reading »

Apr 032015

Singapore’s Maritime and Port Authority, MPA, is asking for near-misses to be reported under a confidential reporting scheme. A form is available from the MPSA’s website. As with similar schemes the MPS assures reporters that their identity will remain confidential and that information provided will not be used for prosecution or litigation.

Near-miss reports can enable safety problems to be identified before they cause an accident. It has been estimated that for each accident there are some 100 near-misses. Those near-misses can also be symptomatic of wider safety problems: Many accident reports include a range of safety concerns unconnected with the incident itself. Continue reading »