Feb 092015
 
FFGcover

Instead of our usual weekly audio podcast we’re releasing our first Video casebook! If you’re a registered MAC user – remember registration free – click in the pic and the bottom of this page and you can watch it and download it following the instructions there.

Free For Registered Users.
If you have not registered with
Maritime Accident Casebook before

click here. Registration is free.

The Case of the Fall From Grace

If you don’t look after your lifeboat
it won’t look after you

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Feb 252015
 

Some users will have noticed that MAC has undergone a bit of weirdness over the past few days. We think we’ve resolved the technical issues and are in the process of checking the site. Let us know if you are having problems.

Feb 192015
 
americandynasty

When the esteemed Denis Bryant says: “This incident was the result of too many errors and failures and misadventures, including an unfortunately timed potty break, to easily summarize. I highly recommend reading the report in full” you can be sure that the report, in this case the US National Transportation Safety board’s report on the contact between the fishing boat American Dynasty and the Canadian warship HMCS Winnipeg, is worth reading.
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Feb 182015
 
stenanautica

At about midnight on the evening of 7/8 July 2014 the ro-ro ferry Stena Nautica with 155 passengers onboard suddenly decided it wanted to go hard starboard while departing from Grenaa Port, Denmark. Since she had not cleared the breakwater the result was a contact incident which put holes in her hull below the waterline and much denting. No-one was hurt but to go by the accident investigation by Denmark’s Maritime Accident Investigation Board, DMAIB, it appears to have been another design-assisted accident.

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Feb 182015
 
oilspill

AML Ship Management GMBH, a German company, and Nicolas Sassin, Chief Engineer of  the car carrier City of Tokyo, have both been charged with knowingly dumping oil into United States’ waters off the coast of Alaska in August 2014 in violation of the Clean Water Act.

AML, which opoerates six similar vessels. and Chief Engineer Nicolas Sassin have also been charged in separate cases filed in the District of Oregon with violating the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships, APPS, for knowingly creating and presenting false records to the US Coast Guard when it arrived in port in Portland, Oregon in September 2014.  The Clean Water Act charges in Alaska and the APPS charges in Oregon are felony offenses. Continue reading »

Feb 152015
 
ashgrates

Crushing incidents have a particular sense of horror all of their own that needs no description. In the case of the fitter aboard the Bahamas-registered cruise ship Seven Seas Voyager he was left with serious injuries when a supposedly isolated ash dump valve closed on him, leading to hospitalisation for serious bruising and shock. He returned to the ship on light duties but two days later but continued to suffer from the effects of the incident and was discharged from the ship to recuperate at home for ten days. Continue reading »

Feb 132015
 
teatowels

Everyone knows, or should know, that rags contaminated with certain types of oil can self-ignite,or spontaneously combust, in places like waste bins but freshly-laundered tea-towels can also do so and lead to a galley fire warns a safety alert from Marine Safety Forum.

A night watchman on a vessel was carrying out his usual tasks and after washing the galley tea towels, they went into the tumble dryer. Once finished approximately 20 tea towels were stacked in a pile and placed on top of the galley freezer. Continue reading »

Feb 132015
 
ShipTracks

Ships can sink so fast that there is no time to transmit a Mayday, if the EPIRB goes down with the ship, as sometimes happens, and the incident occurs outside AIS coverage – or there is no AIS aboard, the ship may well just vanish. By the time the loss comes to light it may be too late for survivors to be rescued. Now a system using existing earth-imaging satellites may make it easier to find missing ships.

Every day some 54 earth-imaging satellites orbit the earth carrying 85 sensors which only take pictures of land. Dr Nigel Bannister, a space scientist at the University of Leicester, in collaboration with the New Zealand Defence Technology Agency and DMC International Imaging, has been testing a concept for using those satellites to find lost vessels and aircraft. Continue reading »