Nov 172014
 
ffg

If you don’t look after your lifeboat

It won’t look after you

We want to adapt this for a seven minute video and mobile app to be distributed free of charge to seafarers. PSC surveys to hand out or show during their visits, shipping companies to their fleets, P&I Clubs to their members, seafarers organisations to their members. Video will undoubtedly be more effective at getting the messages across, however, it does cost a lot more to make to a professional standard. We need to raise a modest $5,000 to cover the cost of producing the video. If you’d like to help save seafarers lives, and address a leading cause if seafarer fatalities then check out the project here.

 

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We’ll call them Paul and Butch. Not their real names but they were real people. They can no longer tell you their story.

Paul was Third Engineer and Butch was an Ordinary Seaman aboard the Lowlands Grace when she anchored in ballast nearly 12 miles off Port Hedland, Australia on the morning of the 6th of October, 2004 to wait for a cargo of iron ore for China. Continue reading »

Nov 202014
 
FVliberty

Sooner or later the chances were that someone was going to be killed aboard the 13.32 metre Irish registered FV Liberty. Given the long list of safety issues uncovered by Ireland’s Marine Casualty Investigation Board, MCIB, and the fact that an earlier incident involving an injury went unreported so the conditions that resulted in the death of a seafarer on 14 February 2013 went undetected, tragedy was inevitable and preventable.

In port at Dunmore East prior to the voyage, one of the trawl nets on the vessel, supplied by the owner, was swapped for a used net supplied by the skipper. The skipper’s net had been kept in storage and had not been used since October 2012. The net was apparently changed because
it was deemed to be more suitable for the intended fishing grounds  where the vessel was going to fish. Continue reading »

Nov 192014
 
bravery
One year to the day after surviving an explosive fire which threatened the lives of 32 people on board his vessel, Captain Andreas Kristensen and his crew of the Britannia Seaways have received the 2014 IMO Award for Exceptional Bravery at Sea, at a special ceremony on Monday, 17 November 2014.
Accepting the IMO medal and certificate on behalf of his crew, Captain Kristensen said the award should also be shared with the passengers, the Norwegian soldiers who assisted the crew during the fire-fighting, and the Norwegian rescue teams and fire-fighters who supported them.
“As Captain, I watched the fire from the bridge, while the crew were fighting it on the open deck in high seas, facing an intense situation with extreme heat. Or striving in the engine room to avoid a blackout which could have had fatal consequences for the ship, the persons onboard and the environment. Personally, I am very proud to be Captain of this crew which managed so well under those extreme circumstances,” Captain Kristensen said.
(Video below)

Continue reading »

Nov 182014
 
container

Over the past few years the industry has tried to bring order to the problem of misdeclared container weights, and issue that presets seriosu hazardous to the lives of seafarers and their ships but that doesn’t stop attempts to fraudulently change indicators of container weight, as the   the ICC’s International Maritime Bureau, IMB, has revealed. It’s worth keeping an eye on those boxes.

The incident uncovered by IMB concerned a container of aluminium scrap in which the information outside the box was tampered with to show false weight and size. An IMB member highlighted the case after being notified of a significant weight shortage on the container, which arrived in the Far East from the Middle East.

During the investigation that followed, the member noted that the tare weight of the container, as shown on its door – and used by the shipper – was 3,680kg. The cube, also shown on the door, was 2,700 cubic feet.

The numbers displayed were entirely acceptable for a 40 foot container. However the box in question was a 20 foot one. Continue reading »

Nov 182014
 
philippines

Authorities in the Philippines have expressed concern over a rise of ‘suicide by ferry’ incidents,reports local media. While the Philippines has  relatively low reported suicide rate of 2.75 per 100,000, a quarter of the global average, June to October incidents involving people jumping from ferries ferries reached 12, up from 10 the previous year.

In the latest incident 34 year old Daniel Pame, jumped from a ferry, nearly hitting hit the vessel’s propeller. He was rescued but attempted to jump again.

The Philippine Coastguard has advised that elatives of passengers at risk coordinate with shipping lines to ensure those who are depressed or have mental problems do not jump off the ship and the PCG can monitor them.

 

 

 

Nov 102014
 
windcat9

November 2012 saw Michael Gallagher, master of the workboat catamaran Windcat 9 with 15 people on board when it hit a large floating military target in Donna Nook Air Weapons Range on 21 November 2012, fined £1,500 and told to pay £8,082 in costs plus a victim surcharge of £120. It was a familiar situation, with the magistrate commenting that Gallagher “should have kept a proper lookout at all times using all available means and be competent in using all his electronic navigational equipment” but i raises an issue and opportunity to get safety culture right in a new, fast-developing industry.

At the time the collision Windcat 9 was estimated to travelling around 23 knots. The hull of the Windcat 9 was badly damaged, causing extensive flooding. Luckily no one was hurt, but there could have been multiple fatalities as a result of this high speed collision which threw several passengers from their seats. Continue reading »

Nov 102014
 
bridge

Dropped objects don’t come much bigger than the Jefferson Avenue Bridge over the Rouge River about 10 kilometres southwest of Detroit, Michigan. It is not especially unusual for ships to hit bridges but fairly rare for bridges to hit ships,only fairly rare because it has happened before under similar circumstances – an impaired bridge operator.

About 0212 on May 12, 2013, the bulk carrier Herbert C. Jackson was en route to deliver a load of taconite pellets, a type of iron ore, to the Severstal ore processing terminal in Dearborn, Michigan. As the vessel approached the Jefferson Avenue Bridge, the master slowed and sounded one long and one short blast of the ship’s whistle to notify the bridge tender of the approach and request a bridge opening. While waiting, the master brought the vessel to a near-complete stop. About 0205, the master saw the bridge begin to open, and when the drawbridge was fully open and green lights were visible on each bridge section, he increased speed.

Continue reading »

Nov 102014
 
timingpinion

Bosun Jack was dead. His body lay under the worklights beside a pool of blood. The instrument of his death was a short distance away. One thing is certain, his killer still hunts seafarers.

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The Bosun We’ll call him Jack. Not his real name but he was a real person. He was 56, and had been at sea for 30 years. On January 11, 2007 he was the boatswain aboard the Tasman Resolution. He knew the ship well, he’d been aboard for six weeks this time but he’d served out three previous contracts aboard her and a sister ship. Along with the chief officer he’d taught the third officer how to handle the ship’s gantry crane. The third officer, we’ll call him Charlie, was 26. He’d been aboard for 10 weeks. It was his second contract since getting his certificate of competency. There were also three ABs working with Charlie and Jack that night, Dave, Ed and Frank.

Continue reading »